Waiting for a Bus

20190420AgnesD361Becoming involved with Agnes Jackson has opened connections to several headstones and there is much work to be done on the FamilySearch Tree before I can upload the photographs as ‘Memories’. A lot of this effort is routine and I can listen to ‘talk YouTube’ without becoming too distracted.  Yesterday morning, however, I had to take time out to witness the infectious delight of a UKIP candidate for the EU gravy train. He’d just heard about Tommy Robinson’s Bus. Cats and pigeons came immediately to mind. Life in the New Wild West, eh? (This morning a BBC radio news bulletin reported that 40% of Conservative councillors told pollsters they will vote for Farage’s Brexit Party in the European Elections. The BBC is the home of government propaganda and fake news – but this offering appears to be true.)

TR’s bus idea isn’t new. Perhaps one of his advisers remembered Daniel Meadows travelling around the country in the early 70s in a Leyland double-decker, reaching out to and photographing ordinary people. I saw it parked outside the Central Library in Hull but was too self-conscious to sit for Daniel’s camera. A few years later I did write to Martin Parr, while he was photographing in Hebden Bridge, but didn’t receive a reply. Sean O’Hagan writes about both photographers in The Guardian – and both took pictures one summer at Filey Butlin’s. If you visit Daniel’s Photobus website please look for his Vimeo story about Florence Alma Snoad. (You can also view it here). It will be less than six minutes out of your life and  I doubt you’ll regret the investment.

Just Agnes from Somewhere

On my afternoon walk yesterday I bumped into the second great-granddaughter of Agnes in Glen Gardens. From the comfort of her mobility scooter, Ann was keeping an eye on her own great-granddaughter in the children’s playground. Our long-time-no-see conversation quickly turned to family history and I promised to look into one of Ann’s mysteries.

I will get to the main affair eventually (I hope) but was soon sidetracked by Agnes and Richard.

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I focused on this couple initially because they are remembered on a headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of RICHARD PASHBY, died Jan 28 1890, aged 50.

Also AGNES, wife of the above, died July 23 1897, aged 54.

Also FRANCES & EMILY, their daughters aged 23 & 27 years.

Also JANE HUNT, mother of the above, died Sep 23 1895, aged 91.

‘Forever with the Lord’

Also GEORGE NELSON, died in infancy.

As you can see from the screenshot, FamilySearch Tree is not very illuminating with regard to Richard and Agnes. Both are separated from their parents and neither can be pinned immediately to time or place. Record hints direct attention to useful Census returns but these haven’t yet to be attached to the pair.

Filey Genealogy & Connections is much more helpful, offering all eleven of the children that can be found in the GRO Births Index. (Infant “George Nelson“  was a grandson of Richard and Agnes.)

FG&C  gives Richard’s parents as Thomas Pashby and Jane CAMMISH but without the dates of their deaths. The MI above suggests that Thomas died quite young and Jane remarried. There is, indeed, a Free BMD record of Jane Pashby marrying Joseph HUNT in Scarborough in the December Quarter, 1856. On another fragment of pedigree awaiting connection on FST, there is a record hint for Richard’s older sister Ann, revealing the Pashby household sheltering lodger Joseph Hunt in 1851. He is a Somerset man, 12 years younger than Jane.

FG&C also does better with the birth family of Agnes, giving her parents and five siblings. Her mother, “Mrs Sarah Jackson” is a PEARSON in the GRO Births Index. All the children were born in Snainton near Scarborough. Father John was born in Ebberston, the next village westward along the present A170.

Now I’ll have to knuckle down to putting Agnes Jackson of Snainton on FST and adding her headstone photo… and joining Richard to the other section of his pedigree on the World Tree.