The Loss of ‘Integrity’

Some mornings I set out on my sea of data to see where the breezes take me. The storm of March 1883 blew up and I think it will take a few days to figure the human consequences. I have been this way before. Last year I introduced the son of the skipper of the yawl Integrity ­– Jacky Windy – and suggested readers go to the old Looking at Filey blog for an account of the Storm. When I provided the link to the British Library Web Archive back then it worked. About a month ago I discovered that the functionality had been compromised. Quite why the British Library summarily ended “Open Access” remains a mystery. I was promised a licence to give REDUX readers access to old stuff, but it hasn’t reached me yet. I’ll give it a few more days.

Integrity, a 33-ton yawl with a lute stern, was built by William SMITH in Scarborough in 1857. She went to Hull and was registered as H1207. Henry WYRILL bought her in 1881 and brought her back to Scarborough, registering her as SH159. Nicholas CAMMISH skippered initially but it was the unfortunate Joseph WINSHIP who went down with her and four crew in the ’83 March storm. It could have been a tragedy for two other families. Yawls sometimes took along a cook, and a boy whose main utility, it seems, was to take the blame for anything that went wrong.)

A syndicated news item named the drowned fishermen.

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“R. Wilkinson” was Horatio, a native of Sussex. (His first name was mangled into “Corattro” by a transcriber of the 1881 census.) Today, I’ll just give the link to George SCOTTER on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. The newspaper was correct in stating he had six children. There are currently nine on FST. Two died before their father drowned and one, Robert born 1877, is a cuckoo in the nest.

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In loving memory of ELIZABETH SCOTTER, who died December 9th, 1899, aged 50 years.

‘God calls on me I must attend

Death takes me from my bosom friends

He hath released me from my pain

In Heaven oh may we meet again’

Also, of GEORGE SCOTTER husband of the above, who was lost at sea March 6th, 1883, aged 37 years.

‘He’s gone the one we loved so dear

To his eternal rest

He’s gone to Heaven, we have no fear

To be forever blest’

 

Are You Scared?

Prof Sir David King says he’s been scared by the number of extreme events, and he called for the UK to advance its climate targets by 10 years.

But the UN’s weather chief said using words like “scared” could make young people depressed and anxious.

Campaigners argue that people won’t act unless they feel fearful.

BBC website

This morning’s sky over the Yorkshire coast looked rather extreme. The contrails in Today’s Image followed the normal track of jetliners shuttling between European cities and North America. Much of the sky, however, was blanketed by lines of persistent vapour on the kind of headings passenger-carrying aircraft don’t usually take. I might have kept my geoengineering thoughts to myself if I hadn’t been triggered by a comment attached to today’s UK Column news bulletin.

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It was probably a coincidence that Prof. King aired his fears on the morning after a night of geoengineering but, just as rising global temperatures make extreme weather events more likely, so will the mainstream media project raise the output of climate stories and offer more opportunities for climate scientists to put the wind up the populace.

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Primrose Valley this morning, looking north

Shanghai

Five of the ten weather stations were over 2ºC warmer than my Pre-Industrial Baseline last week. Shanghai’s 2.84 degrees was, however, no match for Cape Town and they swapped places in the “League Table”. Shanghai fell to 7th.

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The three particularly warm northern stations pushed the hemisphere into the “orange zone” for Week 41, a marked change after last week’s chill. A couple of weeks ago I mentioned the cold spring expected in New Zealand. Across the Tasman, Australia has been promised higher than normal temperatures for the season. Last week, Sydney and Wellington vied for chilliness, with the New Zealand capital winning by a smidgen.

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Our week in north-east England has been the polar-opposite to Shanghai – but it is all relative. The clear warming trend in Durham Tees from Wednesday to Fri continued and gave us a pleasant, sunny weekend.

The Bahamas expected more misery from tropical storm Humberto but has been reprieved. Humberto may strengthen to hurricane status, but a sharp turn northeast is predicted to take it away from the United States.

Winter in New South Wales and Queensland has been described as “disastrous”, but Australians are being prepared by their media for possible “apocalyptic weather” if what is happening in the Antarctic migrates northwards. The Arctic continues to edge towards its state change.