‘Tranquility’ Once More

I offered the following information on Looking at Filey five years ago:-

The Scarborough Mercury of Friday 3rd August 1883 reported under the headline –

Sudden Death On Board a Yawl

On Monday morning [30 July], about 5-30, as the yawl Tranquility was about to proceed to sea, one of the men named Charles Hamilton, a native of Barton upon Humber, was observed by the Captain, William Ross, to sit down. The Captain asked him if he was ill, but the deceased made no reply. Seeing the man looking very ill the skipper ordered the boat to be launched and the deceased was rowed on shore, and the doctor was sent for with all speed, but on Dr. Orr’s arrival he found life to be extinct. The deceased had a wife living at Hull. He had only arrived at Filey on Saturday night last and gone on board the yawl that morning. An inquest will be held.                                               

fm_TranquillitySH9_s
‘Tranquility’ on Filey Sands, photographer unknown, no date, courtesy Filey Museum

Two years earlier the enumerators found a Charles HAMILTON aboard the canal boat Kate in the Basin at Sheffield. Charles was bargeman and “Captain” and his wife Jane was with him. There are no other men of the right age with this name in Yorkshire in 1881 so, although it might seem an unwise career move to exchange the placid waters of Britain’s canals for the dangerous North Sea, this must be the Tranquility’s unfortunate crewman. There are several pieces of supporting evidence in the public record. The census gives the bargeman’s birthplace as Barton, Lincolnshire; his age, 42, gives a calculated birth year of 1839. A birth registration in Brigg Registration District for the December Quarter of 1838 fits age 42 in 1881 perfectly. ‘Brigg’ is the alternative name for Glanford Brigg District, which includes Barton upon Humber within its boundary. Furthermore, in Glanford Brigg Registration District in the September Quarter of 1863 (7a 947) Charles HAMILTON registers his marriage to Jane BARON.

Jane, aged 44 when her husband died, seems to have resigned herself to widowhood. I couldn’t find a record for a second marriage and there’s a death registration that fits quite well – for an eighty year old Jane Hamilton in Sculcoates, March Quarter 1921 (9d 220). Had there been time between 1863 and 1881 for Charles and Jane to have had some children – to brighten her 38 years as a widow with a few grandchildren? I hope so.

An Update

I searched again for children born to Charles and Jane but found none. The 1871 Census catches them on board a vessel in Barrow Haven with two “Servants”, actually two crew members, Robert SAMSON (Mate) and Henry REVE (Ordinary Seaman). Charles is described as a Master Mariner. Ten years later, as noted above, husband and wife were in Sheffield, aboard Kate. Rootlessness seems to have been in Charles’ blood. In 1851, age 12, his address was ‘The Ship Yard, St Mary, Glanford Brigg’. He was already a ‘Mariner’, with his parents and six siblings. Ten years later he was Mate on Elizabeth, a British ship in an unspecified Home Port.

Two years later he married Jane BARON at St Peter’s Church in Barton on Humber. Jane gave her age as 22, a couple of years younger than Charles. The GRO records show that they were born within 6 months of each other, Charles in the December Quarter of 1838 and Jane in the first Quarter of 1839. Jane’s family name at birth is given as BERREN and FamilySearch Tree shows that alternate spellings ran through several generations – BAREN, BARREN, BARRON, BERRIN to name a few. These variants didn’t throw me too much off her trail before she married. Described as a Servant in the marriage register I found her readily enough in that occupation with Licensed Victualler James WALKER at the Queen Inn, St Peter’s, Glanford Brigg – as Jane BARREN age 21.

As Jane HAMILTON I failed completely to find a re-marriage or a death in Lincolnshire or East Yorkshire that was more likely than the one mentioned above. Having discovered that she came from a large family I couldn’t imagine her willingly going further afield in her widowhood.

Charles’ pedigree on FST is minimal. Here is today’s screenshot with additions I might make on the World Tree if I can find the time.

HAMILTONchas_FSTscreenshot

William ROSS (MGC1-VLG) son of Isaac ROSS and Ann CASTLE has  a minimal pedigree on FST  but a more extensive one on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Today’s Images

I couldn’t resist offering an extra Image today. On my early morning walk I met Bentley, a six year old Malamute – a real charmer. I asked permission to photograph him and post his photo and this was kindly given. It is over 3 years since my faithful companion went to the Big Kennel and running into friendly dogs fills the emptiness a little.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs for the Scarborough Harbour photograph, the sharp eyed among you may notice the apparition in the bottom left corner. This chap startled me when I added the date in Photoshop. I can’t recall seeing him before. There is no mystery. The photo is a blend of five bracketed images (to expand the tonal range) and this fellow must have walked by during the taking and subsequent processing without me noticing.

The John Wilson Carmichael painting featured on the info board is titled Scarborough from the Sea hence the lateral viewpoint shift – but the Grand Hotel gives you an anchor.

Also Today

20170730VolsungNecklace1_6mThree Viking reenactment groups banded together in Filey this weekend to put on a show as part of the Return of the  Dragon Festival. I stopped by their camp this morning to see how many were of Scandinavian ethnicity. The ‘Volsung’ I spoke to was a builder from York but was proud to be part-Danish. He kindly allowed me to photograph his necklace of beads and wolf teeth (and chain mail). At the end of our pleasant, friendly conversation I made the mistake of telling him my many times great granfather had defeated Harold Hardrada at Stamford Bridge. He bellowed “Saxon” and I had to make a swift getaway.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s