Applebys

Yesterday was the anniversary of the baptism of William APPLEBY in 1841. There are about a hundred Applebys in Filey Genealogy & Connections and William, son of James and Ann née TAYLOR, is one of six born in Hunmanby. When I began to round up his siblings on the FamilySearch Tree I hoped to connect them to the “Filey Applebys” but found instead that all seem to have steered clear of this place. I was happy to put in the work, though, because the family took me to a place I knew as a child.

William’s father was a corn miller and the birthplaces of his ten children marked his life journey. Second-born Mary Elizabeth in Buckton, the next four in Mappleton, Emma and Eliza in Skirlaugh and the last two in Patrington.

My parents married in the summer of 1940 and when the war was over they lived for a while in a caravan at Woodmansey, near Beverley. Some years after they acquired a proper roof over their heads (and mine) the caravan was transported to Mill Farm, Mappleton. There must have been twenty or more other caravans of unconventional design and construction there, with “regulars” and ephemerals minding their own business or gathering on fine evenings for games of cricket or rounders on the field or down on the beach. I struggle now to remember what happened yesterday but chasing after Applebys brought back so many vivid and happy memories of my summers between the ages of five and twelve.

Mappleton

I remember wandering around All Saints churchyard at dusk and perhaps walked by the grave of Ellen Appleby, who had died 98 years, almost to the day, before I was born.

Ten children equal lots of merging on FST and I didn’t manage to make this Appleby family presentable yesterday. I have not married off any of the children yet, nor “killed off” their parents. There are 22 Filey-born Applebys in FG&C and I expect James the Miller will be related to some of them.

A James Appleby, born in Hunmanby about the same time as “anniversary” William, traded as a Tobacconist in Filey for over twenty years but if the family name is remembered today it will most likely be linked to Appleby’s Farm, where George COLLEY’s horses were stabled. They hauled the cobles down to the waves and back to the landing with their catch. The farm was situated where the Providence Place houses and flats are now.

 

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Photographed this morning.

 

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