Annie o’ the Brigg

On the 23rd January 1894, a gale blew a Filey coble into danger in the Bay. The three occupants were rescued by Matt JENKINSON’s yawl. With this minimal information from a note on Filey Genealogy & Connections, I hoped to fashion a brief post.

In the 19th century there were more people with this family name than any other and among them were several candidates for the owner of the life-saving fishing boat. Captain Sydney  SMITH’s database offered Matthews who owned cobles, herring cobles, and luggers but only one had a yawl, George Peabody, in partnership with the Roberts JENKINSON (senior and junior) and Charles REYNOLDS, a Hunmanby grocer. But that vessel was bought in the mid-1860s,  when “Brazzy” JENKINSON, one of my possibles for 1894, was only 16-years-old. Checking on various branches of the Filey Jenkinson tree took up most of the day and I failed to make a sure connection. So, no post.

I had only one photograph on file for Today’s Image and, by chance, yesterday’s research efforts provided a human story to go with it.

One of two Matthew Jenknsons born in 1832 had a 13 –year-old servant in 1871, Annie Jane PROCTOR. She was the niece of his first wife, Mary Jane Proctor, who had died seven years earlier. In 1873 Annie Jane earned extra money in the summer guiding visitors to the caves and pools at the back of Filey Brigg. The season was nearing its end when the PAGETs of Ruddington Grange, near Nottingham, came to Filey for a couple of weeks. Charles Paget, once a Member of Parliament, was 74 years old but still fit enough to negotiate the rocky shelves on the northern side of the Brigg. It wasn’t much more than an hour to low tide but it would appear from the story that has come down to us that Annie had a sixth sense of danger and urged her employers to return to a place of greater safety than a ledge near the Emperor’s Pool. Mr. Paget wanted to stay a little longer and was soon swept into the sea by a rogue wave, with his wife and sister-in-law. Annie managed to grab hold of Miss TEBBUTT, saving her life, but the Pagets were lost. There is an account of the tragedy here. Annie was misrepresented as “Emma Proctor” in every newspaper account I have found, and I have been unable to find any reports of her being thanked, let alone rewarded, for saving Miss Tebbutt.

The Paget family did pay for a stone pillar to be made by monumental mason William DOVE of Scarborough, bearing a warning to visitors. It stood near Agony Point for many years, on the south side of the Brigg, before suddenly disappearing. The inscription was later found and can be seen in the garden of Filey Museum.

Charles PAGET is on FamilySearch Tree but there are more of his children and forebears here. Stuffynwood offers a short biography.

Annie o’ the Brigg is not on FST but you will find her with husband Frederick and twelve children on FG&C.

Have another look at Today’s Image – the “Emperor’s Bath” is in the doodle beyond the foreground tide pool.

A Sign of the Times

On my afternoon stroll today I was surprised to see a couple of sinister-looking ships in the bay. My pocket camera did its best to shoot them…

20180124A900

20180124HMSCattistock

Two people walking their dogs on the beach told me the vessels were NATO warships. A friend at Flat Cliffs had clocked them already. When I got home Ship AIS confirmed they were part of a NATO force. A900 flies a Dutch flag and M31 the Royal Ensign. The latter ship is HMS Cattistock, a minesweeper, and appears to be Baltic-bound for three jolly months rattling the Russian bear’s cage. Let us hope she gets up to nothing more annoying than that. Sadly, the west seems to want a big profitable war and may find an excuse anytime soon.

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