Miner, Soldier, Accountant, Contractor’s Clerk

In July 1938 the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer informed readers of the marriage of Samuel Hughes DIXON, Accountant, to Olive, the eldest daughter of Charles FERRAR, of Filey. Samuel, the notice said, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Philip Dixon, of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire. He had been born in Fenton, one of the unlovely Six Towns of The Staffordshire Potteries, and at age 13 in 1901 he worked as a miner below ground, probably at Fenton Glebe Colliery.

Ten years later his presence on the North-West Frontier was noted. He was with the 2nd Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment, which had been raised in the next Pottery town in the chain, Longton. He didn’t leave the army until 1929 and so, had he stayed with the North Staffs, would have served for at least ten years in India, a couple of years in Ireland until the Free State was established, and the remainder of his army life at the regiment’s depot in Lichfield or other “home stations”.

His military conduct had been exemplary and for the last ten years he was a Company Quarter-Master Sergeant. He re-started his civilian life in Burslem, as licensee of The Legs of Man Inn in the Market Place. For eight years there were no complaints against him but early in 1937, he found himself in court, charged with supplying intoxicating liquor to two women during “non-permtted” hours.  One of the women, Elizabeth Bridgford, pleaded guilty and was fined but the evidence that she was supplied after 10pm was not strong enough to convict Samuel.

The Stipendiary Magistrate’s view that the case was nonetheless “suspicious” may have weighed heavily upon Samuel. Ten months later The Staffordshire Sentinel reported that the Wine Licence for The Legs o’Man Inn had been transferred from Samuel Hughes Dixon to Alfred William Wood.

Samuel must have quit The Potteries immediately because a couple of months later his marriage to Olive FERRAR was registered in Buckrose. Olive was forty-years-old. Samuel, aged 50, claimed to be an accountant. Eighteen months later, when the Census was taken at the beginning of the Second World War, he told the enumerator who called at 67 Muston Road that he was a Contractor’s Clerk.

Samuel died in the summer of 1952 and is buried at Cayton. His widow married again and is remembered on the FERRAR stone in St Oswald’s churchyard as Olive JACKSON. She died in 1975 aged 78, about 18 months after her youngest sister Gladys Ann BROWN. Their brother Arthur’s life had been snuffed out at nineteen while fighting for King and Country in France.

E152_FERRARchas_20121104_fst

Find the Ferrars, and Samuel, on the Shared Tree.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s