PC Harvey and the Fisher Lads

In the summer of 1870, five Filey fisher lads were in court, charged with obstructing a footpath on the Crescent “by walking abreast and jostling each other”.

P.C. D. Harvey, stationed at Filey, said that on the 19th [of June], about 8 p.m., he was on duty there, on the Crescent. His attention was drawn to the defendants, all standing on the footpath and larking. He crossed over the road to speak to them, but on seeing him they made off. He followed them, and told them if they continued this practice, he would have to report them.

On that same evening, Police-sergeant Hanswell, in plain-clothes, saw the defendants, walking four or five abreast…

…and taking up nearly the whole of the pathway, which is 9 or 10 feet wide. They repeatedly jostled each other when persons were coming, so as to force them off this pathway. He watched them for about half an hour…and saw several people had to turn off. For some time this practice had been going on and many complaints made.

The defendants were found guilty and offered a choice of paying the court 6s 6d or going to prison for 7 days.

Three other Filey fisher lads were offered the same choice for a similar offence.

The miscreants were Thomas Robinson, George Arvery, Abraham Sanderson, William Waller, Matthew Cammish, Benjamin Watson, William Scotter and Alfred Lowley.

I traced most of them were quickly in Filey Genealogy & Connections, aged between 16 and 18. Four or five years later, several were married and fathers. The sea may have given them a living but it also took away. Abraham Sanderson was baptized on 15 October 1854 and his father was drowned three days later. William Waller was eight when his father may have suffered a similar fate. If Matthew Cammish was Matthew Jenkinson Cammish (born 1854), he would mourn the loss at sea of four uncles. William Scotter was not Filey-born. One of his sons would be killed in the First World War, aged 29.

I imagine the jostling fisher lads were slightly older versions of this bunch, posing against the lifeboat house doors.

FiveLads_md_m
Photographer unknown, no date, courtesy Martin Douglas.

Daniel HARVEY was caught in Filey by the census enumerator the following year, living in Church Street near the vicarage. Both he and his wife, Mary Jane, were Gloucestershire born and bred but spent most of their adult lives in Yorkshire. They had eight children and by 1871 had buried two of them; Marmaduke at about the time the fisher lads were misbehaving. Of the five young ones in Church Street, three would reach a good age.

At age six, Daniel was a “cloth worker” in Minchinhampton and at 26 a pawnbroker. Entering the police force was good for him. In 1881 he was a sergeant in Gate Fulford, York and ten years later a Superintendent, living “above the shop”  in Welton near Hull.

Daniel died in 1899. I was initially surprised that this Harvey family was not represented at all on the FamilySearch Tree. The only son to make it to adulthood had ended up as headmaster of a school in Cumberland, where his wife was the assistant head. But they had no children of her own. Annie Eliza Harvey did not marry and Lilian’s marriage didn’t last long – husband Walter JACKLIN died at 43. So there are no known descendants of Daniel and Mary Jane to share memories with us.

I found a way to remember them through Wallace Dean’s wife, Sarah Elizabeth GREENWOOD. I’ll add some more of their people over the next few days.

20190808Crescent
The Crescent, this afternoon

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s