Researching More Broadley

One thing led to another. Wondering when the row of houses on Filey Foreshore that includes St Kitts was built, I looked for old maps. This is how the site looked in 1851.

The first block of The Crescent had been built but the South Pampletines undercliff from Cargate Hill south to Mouse Haven must have looked like the Nuns Walk does today. The darker patch where the X is may have been a small pond. I think I have marked the location of No.2 The Foreshore accurately but you can check by visiting the National Library of Scotland to get a feel for the area on an early 1” Ordnance Survey map. The initial surveying was done around the time John Bourryeau BROADLEY died but the map was not published until about twenty years later. Survey teams may have returned in the 1870s and 80s to find houses on The Foreshore that were not there in the late 1860s. Look here and get your bearings by moving the transparency slider. Note the present-day “pond” where children paddle in the summer months.

Even at this small scale, you should be able to roughly locate St Kitts. But head to the North Yorkshire County Council website and look at their Historic Map. Zoom out from Northallerton Station and scroll eastwards to Filey. When you reach the foreshore area zoom in until the building plan appears, outlined in red. The Paddling Pool will be a visual cue and the historic base will look very similar to the 1851 map shown above.

The house from which John B. Broadley departed in 1867 is architecturally very similar to the one he occupied in Scarborough in 1861. This made me think he may have used his inherited wealth to build five houses by the sea in New Filey and occupy one, naming it St Kitts because he knew where his bread had been buttered. Perhaps someone has the deeds of one of the houses, giving a year of construction that would support or trash this hypothesis. I now think the houses were built after John’s death and it is just a coincidence that one was named St Kitts.

John and his family are represented on the FamilySearch Shared Tree here but the woman responsible for his middle name is not related to him by blood. She is the wife of his granduncle John.

Elizabeth was the eldest of eleven girls born to sugar plantation owners Zachariah BOURRYEAU and Sophia SHAW. The girls had one brother, John, and when he died only Elizabeth, Hannah and Mary appear to have been beneficiaries of his will and the ensuing sale of the Simon estates in Grenada and St Kitts. Elizabeth had been married to John Broadley for thirteen years when her brother died and the journey made by her portion to later members of the Broadley family has been difficult to follow. Cutting to the chase, John the Lancer is arguably a Broadley alpha male in Burke’s Landed Gentry, but in reality, it was his aunt Sophia, Lady of the Manor in Welton, who owned thousands of acres in the East Riding. She was much revered.

On the day of the funeral, Sophia’s nephew Captain Broadley rode in the first mourning coach with his wife Eleanor, Mr W. H. Harrison and Mrs Sykes. William Henry HARRISON was the husband of Sophia’s younger sister Mary – and he inherited the lionesses’ share, including Welton House (page 2 if you follow this link to an East Riding Museums pdf).

My research yesterday led me to other Broadley men of war.

Broadley Harrison

John Henry William Harrison-Broadley

Squadron Leader John Harrison-Broadley

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