Still Missing

Four days into the year and it is clear that I have little hope of reaching my target of putting a profile a day on Wiki Tree (with a Filey churchyard headstone photo attached.) Six months ago (21 July) I pointed out the “bad marriage” of Ann TAYLOR to Richard MARSHALL. A contributor to the family has given Ann her rightful husband so that I can now honor the sacrifice of their grandson, Thomas CLARK, who went missing on the Western Front in July 1917. The work involved in preparing for his memorial to be put on FamilySearch and Wiki Tree has taken several days – mainly because links appeared to several previously unrecorded family units.

I put the stone remembering Thomas on the Shared Tree as a memory this morning and will attempt to create his Wiki Tree profile tomorrow.

On 19 July last year I wrote briefly about Thomas, owning up to not finding a record of his death on the Commonwealth Graves website. I have searched again but his disappearance is still a mystery. He has been confused online with a Thomas CLARKE who went missing in action in July 1918. His body was recovered and he is remembered at Pernes British Cemetery in the Pas de Calais – but his parents lived in Leicester, so he is almost certainly not our Thomas (the provided Filey connections notwithstanding).

Edmund, Ann Taylor’s younger brother, crossed the Pennines and married in Lancashire. His son James emigrated to Canada and some of his descendants (the children of Brian Taylor) traveled on to New Zealand. My thanks to Joan for this information – and for making it easy for me to add the remembrance of Thomas to the pedigree.

Townscape 65 · Scarborough

South Bay

Four Second Waves

For what they are worth. “With Covid” weekly deaths sourced at Worldometer. I have divided 2018 deaths from all causes (The World Bank)by 52, paying no heed to seasonal fluctuations. As the four countries are assessed in the same way, the “patterns” revealed have some validity. (When the actual 2020 deaths from all causes are reported, I will perhaps create a second set of charts to give a more accurate picture.)

The French second wave is almost as old as the first but still has a way to go before Covid related deaths fall below 2% of expected deaths.

The UK second wave began to rise again in Week 13 – a trend that one would expect if our old friend the winter flu was still around.

Second waves began later in Germany and Sweden and both countries have recently completed their tenth week.

The y-axis is the same for all four charts. Germany’s second wave is the most frightening at first glance but its peak (so far) is the lowest of the quartet. Sweden’s second wave appears to be running out of energy but it could “uptick” UK-fashion.

It should be borne in mind that deaths from all causes in most countries are at or below what would be expected in an average year. Fewer people are dying from the big killers because, for example, heart attack and pneumonia deaths have been routinely and dishonestly ascribed to Covid-19. Hardly anyone has died from old flu since the new kid showed up. In the UK,  the number of under sixties without other “health issues” who succumbed to “the rona” is said to be less than four hundred.. Which is why the psychos have invoked mutant Covid strains in the UK and South Africa. When final tallies are made for 2020 I expect more people will have died from lock down, mask-wearing and vaccines than Covid-19.

For what? All will be revealed next year, probably.

Measure of Man 49 · Work & Leisure

A Lufthansa Cargo jet flying over a West Avenue drive-in cinema this afternoon. Trade goods in a McDonnell Douglas MD-11F heading to Chicago from Frankfurt. I don’t know what the film is. (The Greatest Showman was advertised but I’m sure I caught a glimpse of Colin Firth.)

We All Make Mistakes

I was a bit sniffy in last Thursday’s post about the treatment of poor Elizabeth Agar nee CHEWon the FamilySearch Shared Tree. Delving further into the tangled web of Filey parish Chews, I realised today that I had given Robert CHEW, born in 1777, at least twelve more years on the planet than he had enjoyed. I cannot remember now what possessed me to create an ID for him two years ago when there was a good record in existence already – though it didn’t offer a date of his passing or burial.

This Robert was Elizabeth’s father but there were two namesakes, born in 1775 and 1776 – and they both married a woman called Ann. Who isn’t going to make mistakes in such circumstances?

I had confidently suggested that the Robert born in 1775 had died in 1853 but today noticed his wife, Ann HICK, was a widow in 1841. He was a first cousin to the Robert born in 1776 who married Ann PARKINSON. It appears that Elizabeth’s father Robert is not related by blood to the other two. Elizabeth’s mother, Elizabeth nee COOK, was 1777 Robert’s second wife and appears to have died a few months after her second daughter’s birth. (There was an Elizabeth the First who lived for just six months of 1810/11.)

1775 Robert and Ann Hick’s first child, John, lived for less than a month of 1810. They called their next child John. Born in 1811, he married Jane SMURWAITE (sic) in Filey St Oswald’s in 1834. Their three children were born in Lebberston (Filey parish) between 1835 and 1838 – and then John died.

Crows Nest is now a Caravan Park wedged between Blue Dolphin and The Flower of May. Though the enumerator’s book indicates that Jane is the head of the household, the Find My Past digitizer suggests that Robert is her husband. He is more likely to have been the son of 1776 Robert and Ann Parkinson, helping the bereft wife of his first cousin once removed with the farm work.

I looked for Jane in later censuses before finding that she married again in 1849 and emigrated to America with husband Thomas HOWLETT and their daughter. (This information provided by a Find My Past User Tree.)

Helpful Robert may have died a single man in 1858, aged 43. Ten years earlier he possibly attended the wedding of his younger brother George – to Ellen or Eleanor CLARK in Filey St Oswald’s.

Another George Chew, younger brother of 1775 Robert, is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Next to him are grand niece Mary Ann and great grandniece Mary Elizabeth HANSON.

You can find this George (and 1775 Robert) on the Shared Tree here but there is still a lot of web untangling to do (and the spinning of new strands) – Mary Ann Chew is better represented at the moment by a duplicate ID, MGCT-GK2.

Townscape 64 · Seafront, Foggy Morning