A Misunderstanding

There is a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections to the effect that Job Charles CHAPMAN was a bigamist.

In the 1901 census, he is enumerated at Fern House, on Filey Foreshore, a Lodging-House keeper, aged 50. His “housekeeper” is 51-year-old Teresa IBBERSON, a single woman.

The note:-

1901; living at Fern House with sister in law. Written over status: marr which was crossed out and bigamist written over. Ellen’s sister Teresa was entered as wife. This was also crossed out and sister in law entered.

The page image (© TNA) tells a different story.

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Job, a Somerset man, married Teresa’s sister in Leeds in 1880 when he was 29. Ellen was six years his senior and died aged just 52 in 1898.

In 1881, not long married, Job and Ellen are enumerated as “Visitors” at widow Ferguson’s fine residence, No.7 The Crescent, Filey. A third visitor is Teresa, her occupation given as “Ladies Maid”.

In 1891, Job and Ellen are keeping Ackworth House on the Foreshore Road. Ellen was born in Ackworth near Pontefract, so perhaps she bestowed the name upon this building. Theresa is a grocer in Murray Street.

Thirteen years after Ellen’s death, Job and his housekeeper are still in partnership in 1911. The Find My Past transcription doesn’t give Teresa any work to do but the page image shows a faint ditto flourish indicating that she is a lodging-house keeper too. The couple has downsized to St Kitts, a short distance south along the Foreshore Road (now “The Beach”).

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On the 1911 census form, Job indicates that St Kitts has 18 rooms.

When they retired from the business of looking after summer visitors to Filey, Job and Teresa downsized again, to a modest property in Queen’s Terrace, Filey.

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They both died at the house with the blue door in 1927. Teresa departed first, in February, and Job followed eight months later. Job and the two sisters sleep together in St Oswald’s churchyard, an eternal ménage à trois.

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Job’s inscription tells us that he was “for 35 years Tyler of the Royal Lodge of Freemasons No.643”.

At rest. So mote it be.

More Errant Forecasts

The southern hemisphere was warmer than I expected last week with Buenos Aires and Rio taking two of the top three places in the Table. This took the gloss off correctly nominating Koltsovo for Week 45 top spot.

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Roughly in the centre of the Russian Federation, Koltsovo might be expected to descend rapidly into sub-zero winter. Last week seemed to be the beginning – after the last burst (perhaps) of heat.

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The first-day figure of almost ten degrees centigrade above P-I is the highest I can recall being recorded in my ten stations this year. A fall from a daily mean of 13.4°C on Saturday to 1.8 the following Friday is not something I’d care to experience. Having said that, Durham Tees was colder every day of Week 45 than Koltsovo’s warmest day. (Range 10.7°C on Wednesday to 12.2 on Friday.)

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A warm Koltsovo has been the main reason for the northern hemisphere reversing the trendline forecast of cooling to the end of the meteorological year.

A quick look at the GFS model for this week points to Koltsovo turning warm again for several days. Three southern hemisphere stations might make it into the top four (Cape Town, Rio and Wellington. I’m putting pretend money on Washington and Buenos Aires propping up the Table at the end of Week 46.

Typhoon Hagibis was the week’s most obvious villain but the Arctic is a continuing cause for concern. For the next ten days, GFS indicates it will run between two and three degrees centigrade above what used to be considered “normal”. For weird weather-with-consequences, keep your eye on California. Let Jane Tande be your guide.

 

Cousin Thomas and Comrade Tom

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou may have noticed another CHAPMAN on the Gristhorpe War Memorial (Thursday’s post). Thomas William is a first cousin to Robert, and you can find him on the Shared Tree.

Serving in different regiments, it is unlikely that they ever fought side by side, but it seems that both the 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment and the 6th Scottish Borderers were at Delville Wood in July 1916. Allied forces were tasked with taking the wood “at all costs” and from the 15th July into August the fighting was brutal, a satanic mix of close combat exchanges and intense artillery barrages. If the bodies of the fallen were found, many could not be identified. Thomas was killed on 23 July and, as one of the “missing”, is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.

A comrade of Thomas in the 12th Battalion was Tom CHAPMAN, son of John William and Eliza née CAMMISH. He was not related by blood to Thomas William and Robert. Tom may well have been struck down on the same day as Thomas. He died on 27 July from wounds received during the battle for “Devil’s Wood”. He is buried at La Neuville British Cemetery at Corbie and is remembered at a family grave in St Oswald’s churchyard. Find him on the Shared Tree.

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