From Appleby to Welburn

This isn’t a post about a journey from Westmorland to Yorkshire but the change of name when two young APPLEBY women married two men called William WELBURN. The marriages were registered in Scarborough in the last quarter of 1860 and the first three months of 1861. The births of a dozen children were registered to mothers with the maiden name Appleby in the following decade.

After hours of piecing the families together, I still have very little information about the first couple, Harriet and William Edward. I concentrated my effort on Elizabeth and plain William because their grave is to be found in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of ELIZABETH, the beloved wife of WILLIAM WELBURN of Gristhorpe, died Nov 19th 1884, aged 49 years.

‘Be ye also ready for in such an hour

As ye think not the Son of man cometh’

Also of the above WILLIAM WELBURN, died Jan 19th 1907, aged 83 years.

‘His end was peace’

Also of their daughter, CATHERINE, born June 22nd 1868, died July 17th 1947.

William may have ended his life as a Welburn but he began it as a WELLBOURN in Weaverthorpe. Elizabeth is a daughter of Robert APPLEBY and Rachel MAW. If you follow the FST links you’ll see that the couple hasn’t yet been brought together on the World Tree.

I am fairly sure of my ground now and will marry them soon and give their nine children (known for sure). For a while, I despaired of finding a piece of “solid evidence” that I was on their right track. It turned up in the 1861 Census. The Find My Past transcription offered William WELBORN, 34, a Farm Labourer born Weaverthorpe and his wife Elizabeth, 27, born Muston. They were described as “lodgers”, and the page image revealed they were under the roof of Rachel APPLEBY. She is married rather than a widow but there is no sign of husband Robert. She appears to have a four-year-old son called William (though she is 51 years old). The child may have been Elizabeth’s boy. Also in residence are two of Rachel’s grandsons, Thomas SHIELDS, 9, and James APPLEBY, 9 months. The GRO Births Index suggests both boys were illegitimate. Rachel’s birthplace is given as Hackness in several sources but in others a nonsense place, something like “Tholso”. An Internet search doesn’t help with this but an OS Landranger map shows a farm – “Thirlsey”- just outside the village. I’m going with that.

When Elizabeth died in 1884, her youngest child, George, was twelve and William quickly found another wife to help with his large and still not flown brood. I haven’t found the marriage yet but at the 1891 Census George has a half-brother, Harry, 5, and a step-mother, Hannah. William has made himself about five years younger, reducing the age difference with his second wife to ten years. He is less sensitive in 1901 when the gap is more realistic at 19 years. Aged 77 William is still farming, at Gristhorpe. I wonder if he had any rest from his labours before he found peace.

Applebys

Yesterday was the anniversary of the baptism of William APPLEBY in 1841. There are about a hundred Applebys in Filey Genealogy & Connections and William, son of James and Ann née TAYLOR, is one of six born in Hunmanby. When I began to round up his siblings on the FamilySearch Tree I hoped to connect them to the “Filey Applebys” but found instead that all seem to have steered clear of this place. I was happy to put in the work, though, because the family took me to a place I knew as a child.

William’s father was a corn miller and the birthplaces of his ten children marked his life journey. Second-born Mary Elizabeth in Buckton, the next four in Mappleton, Emma and Eliza in Skirlaugh and the last two in Patrington.

My parents married in the summer of 1940 and when the war was over they lived for a while in a caravan at Woodmansey, near Beverley. Some years after they acquired a proper roof over their heads (and mine) the caravan was transported to Mill Farm, Mappleton. There must have been twenty or more other caravans of unconventional design and construction there, with “regulars” and ephemerals minding their own business or gathering on fine evenings for games of cricket or rounders on the field or down on the beach. I struggle now to remember what happened yesterday but chasing after Applebys brought back so many vivid and happy memories of my summers between the ages of five and twelve.

Mappleton

I remember wandering around All Saints churchyard at dusk and perhaps walked by the grave of Ellen Appleby, who had died 98 years, almost to the day, before I was born.

Ten children equal lots of merging on FST and I didn’t manage to make this Appleby family presentable yesterday. I have not married off any of the children yet, nor “killed off” their parents. There are 22 Filey-born Applebys in FG&C and I expect James the Miller will be related to some of them.

A James Appleby, born in Hunmanby about the same time as “anniversary” William, traded as a Tobacconist in Filey for over twenty years but if the family name is remembered today it will most likely be linked to Appleby’s Farm, where George COLLEY’s horses were stabled. They hauled the cobles down to the waves and back to the landing with their catch. The farm was situated where the Providence Place houses and flats are now.

 

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Photographed this morning.