A Boy Named Allison

In 1881, the census enumerator identified the head of a Mariners Place household as “Harrison Mason”. I think this must have been a mistake. At Charleston Farm, Boynton, in 1851, Allison was a 17-year-old farm servant, bunking down with several other young men. In 1871, working as an agricultural labourer, he was at home with his parents in Thwing, his given age 35, his status unmarried, and his name again, unashamedly, Allison.

Two doors away that year, John BENTLEY, hind to Mrs BARUGH, (for whom Allison had worked twenty years earlier), was playing host to his sister in law, Barbara BOWMAN. Barbara’s sister, Mrs Bentley, was on this census night some miles away, under her parents’ roof in Filey – in Mariners Place.

One can’t help being a little intrigued, especially as the enumerator wrote that Barbara was unmarried.

Barbara HUGILL had married Francis Bowman in 1860. He may have died in the first years of the marriage – I haven’t yet found his death registration – but, towards the end of 1879, widow Bowman married Allison Mason in Little Driffield. Barbara’s father had died a couple of years earlier and at the 1881 census “Harrison Mason” shared his home with mother in law Mary. The 76-year-old lady paid her way, working as a laundress with Barbara. Allison was now working as a “general labourer”. He didn’t quite make it to the next census.

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In affectionate remembrance of ALLISON MASON, the beloved husband of BARBARA MASON of Filey who died April 3rd 1890, aged 56 years.

‘Be ye also ready for in such an hour

As ye think not, the Son of man cometh’

 

Also of BARBARA MASON, the beloved wife of the above who died March 18th 1903, aged 65 years.

‘Leave this world without a tear, save for the friends

I loved so dear. To heal their sorrows, Lord

Descend and to the friendless prove a friend’

 

Also THOMAS HUGILL, father of the above BARBARA MASON, who died Nov 19th 1879, aged 77 years.

Also MARY his beloved wife, who died Nov 16th 1886, aged 83 years.

‘Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.

Yeah, saith the spirit, that they may rest

From their labours’

I don’t think Barbara had any children with her two husbands but there was another boy named Allison in this part of Yorkshire, briefly. The registrations of his birth and death are found in the first quarter of 1877, in Driffield. His father was John MASON, his mother Sarah DOBSON, but I haven’t yet found the family connection to the older Allison – which must surely exist.

Find the Allison who grew to be a man on FST.

The Smiths

One William SMITH married Jane NEWTON in Bridlington on 1 June 1765. They had two daughters, Jane born in 1766 in Bridlington and Harriet taking her first breath 22 years later in Scarborough. This is what Filey Genealogy & Connections suggests.

FamilySearch offers a similar story.

It would appear that I made some changes on FST a while ago that agreed on Harriet being their child but I didn’t add baby Jane, even though she “fits” better, born a year after the marriage of her parents.

Harriet’s mother heads one of the households in Roe’s Buildings, Filey, in 1841. Her age, however, is given as “80”, making her four years old in 1765. The first major British census was somewhat cavalier when noting ages but in 1849 a local newspaper had the following death notice:-

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The civil registration agrees that Jane was 91 when she died.

I have looked in vain for another William Smith who married a Jane but, obviously, I must make some changes on FST.

Harriet is with her mother in Roe’s Buildings under her married name, AGAR. Her husband drowned in Plymouth Harbour in 1816. The couple is remembered on their headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, with Michael’s sister, Zillah.

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“Sleeping” next to Harriet is her sister, Sarah, wife of Jeremiah HUDSON.

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In Memory of SARAH, wife of JEREMIAH HUDSON, Scarborough, Master Mariner, and daughter of WILLIAM and JANE SMITH, who departed this life 11th day of July 1844, aged 52 years.

Sarah is also resident at Roe’s Buildings in 1841, her age given as 45. I thought Sarah must be a widow too but further research found her husband enumerated seven miles away in Scarborough, living alone in Sand Side. He was a sailor and the separation may have been one of convenience. I’m perhaps being charitable because a few months after  Sarah’s death his first child with Jane BROADRICK was born in London. I’ll write more about Jeremiah another time but there is a post on the first Looking at Filey blog, Fisherman Smacked, that might serve to introduce him, though it contains some errors of fact and interpretation. He is on FST with his second wife and their brood but two appearances with Sarah only give the marriage.

The fourth elderly lady at Roe’s buildings was widow Elizabeth BROWN. Three years older than Jane, she may have been her sister. That could be a clue to Jane’s identity – but I haven’t found Elizabeth’s marriage yet. Elizabeth is resting eternally next to Michael Agar and Harriet.

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In memory of ELIZABETH BROWN of Scarborough, widow, who died 17th November 1843, aged 85 years.

Elsewhere…

The “deal” that was so good for the Eurocrats has been dismissed in the UK parliament.  Terrific, but Dr Steve has more confidence than I have that Brexit will happen this year. Styx (‘ware F-bombs) gives some reasons why wanting to remain in the EU makes little sense.

He Lived in a Pigsty

While searching for stories about Robert CAMMISH, owner of the yawl Jane Elizabeth I found this affecting snippet: –

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Poor lad.

The COLEMAN family presented themselves neatly in the Filey censuses of 1861 and 1871. The seemingly horrible father hailed from Suffolk and the mother from Scotland. They married in Beverley, about 25 miles or so from Filey. All seven of their children were born in Filey, in Chapel Street or on Scarborough Road. On John’s agricultural labourer’s wages, life must have been a struggle. It isn’t really a surprise that everything fell apart when the mother, Jane, died the June quarter of 1876, aged 42. And a month after James’ court appearance, his older sister Caroline died at just twenty. Their father must have been in despair.

The family fragmented. When the census was taken in 1881, Thomas, 22, was working as a general labourer in Whitby; Isaac, 16, was living in Reighton; the younger sister, Esther, was lodging in Silver Head Street, Scarborough. The undersized boy who had lived with pigs, now 15, was apprenticed in Bridlington to blacksmith Charles DOOKS. I wonder how much bigger and stronger he’d grown! About six weeks before the census was taken, James was in court again, but I’m happy to report it was a case of a biter bit.

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Five shillings then equates to about £25 now.

This is the last bit of information I’ve found concerning James. Unable to find a marriage or death registration for him makes me think that he may have emigrated. But his name surfaces in the Coleman family in 1897 when Isaac named the second child he has with Ada JACKSON after his little brother. After a spell in the army, with the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, Isaac married in 1894, was a “steelworker” in 1901 and a “general worker labourer” in 1911.

Isaac’s father, John, was at the wedding and “made his mark” in the parish register as a witness. Curiously, the mother’s maiden name on James Harris the Younger’s civil registration is CUSTANCE. I can’t explain this. The mother of Isaac’s other children is, as expected, JACKSON – except for a second John William, whose mother is also given as CUSTANCE. On the 1911 census form, John states that he and Ada had produced nine children in their 17 years of marriage, of whom two had died. These figures tally with the GRO Index of Births (and Deaths) – if the Custance children are included.

The Filey Colemans are present and correct in Filey Genealogy & Connections but were scattered about on the FamilySearch Tree. I made an effort today to bring them together. I have held back from connecting the father, John Harris COLEMAN, to his forebears because he is currently absent from the list of children born to Jeremiah and Sarah née HARRIS. There isn’t much doubt that he belongs there but I’m hoping “family” will check the records and add the Filey branch to the world tree.

Grave Number One

When you enter the west gate of St Oswald’s churchyard, the first headstone remembers a small FOX and his mother. John and Maisie Crimlisk began their Survey here and tagged the grave A/1. The East Yorkshire Family History Society started their more recent transcription effort at the other end of the west wall, by the car park entrance.  Their Number One is the Crimlisks’ A/28, the grave of Jane Margaret Scrivener.

I decided a couple of days ago that I should get serious with the uploading of my headstone photographs to FamilySearch (as Memories). I have over 200 of them.  It is tempting to flit about in an “as and when” kind of way, but I thought I ’d try to be disciplined. Starting with Jane Margaret.

I expected her “story” would be quite simple; marrying in 1867, having two children and dying in 1871. It hasn’t turned out this way.

Jane married surgeon Charles Waters SCRIVENER. His mother was Anna CALAUM, Thomas SCRIVENER’s second wife. Her first child with Thomas, I think, was Henry Thomas and he married Jane’s widowed mother, Elizabeth Sweet née WHINFIELD. In 1861, 19-year-old Jane was living with her mother (41) and step-father (29), in Newcastle upon Tyne.

A year after Jane’s death her step-father’s brother, Charles the Surgeon, married Mary Ann Woodall. I failed to find the marriage record today but in 1881 Mary Ann’s unmarried sister, 62-year-old June CALAM,  was staying with the Scriveners at 3, Rutland Street, Filey. Further investigation revealed that Calam should be CALAUM. Ring a bell?

I was pleased to find some Newcastle SWEETs on FST and in reasonably good order, but the Bridlington SCRIVENERs are a mass (or mess) of duplicate PIDs that will take some sorting. They constitute an interesting challenge, though, and I hope to set them straight before moving on to Grave Number Two. (This is going to take forever – and none of us have got forever.)

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Jane Margaret on FST.

Wonderful Amy

 

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photo: Wikipedia

Amy JOHNSON died 77 years ago today when the Airspeed Oxford she was ferrying from Scotland to the south of England crashed in the Thames estuary.

 

I knew from an early age that she was special. The headmistress at Stoneferry Junior and Infants School told us about her friend and described some of her achievements as an aviatrix.

Listen to an affectionate praise song (30s style) and find the (incomplete) family on the FamilySearch Tree.

When the Census was taken in September 1939 Amy’s parents were living in Cardigan Road, Bridlington, and in 1958 they donated a collection of her trophies, mementos to Sewerby Hall.

Sleigh Ride to Mount Pleasant

I have been led astray the last three days – on a long and circuitous journey taking in Middle England, Scotland, Holland, and India, with a fanciful spin round Amen Corner on the way.

There are countless places in the English speaking world that have areas called Mount Pleasant – see how many there are in and around Swansea – but I fetched up just 20 miles north of Filey, in Robin Hood’s Bay.

Intrigued by the rather quick remarriage of Thomas Matthew EDWARDS, following the too early death of Elizabeth Alice STORY, I went in search of Ann NICHOL. She was 36 years old when she married Thomas in 1882 and I found soon enough that her maiden surname was possibly SLEIGH. I fired up the LDS 1881 British Census – I have my family’s heartland counties in a FileMaker database – and searched for Ann. Imagine my surprise…

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Well Road doesn’t exist anymore in Bridlington unless it is masquerading as Well Lane, but I was really pleased to see the widow Nicoll next door to her parents. Young Ann had also had a son with George NICOLL, given name Linwood, his grandmother’s maiden surname. I haven’t found a record of his death but he would have been ten years old in 1881. All four Nicoll children were born in Forfarshire/Angus, Scotland.

George NICOLL, a Scotsman, had married Ann SLEIGH in Kings Norton, Worcestershire in 1866. He took his young bride home and died aged 49 in Forfar, in 1878. Ann returned to England with the three girls, met widower Thomas EDWARDS and his young son Walter William, joined forces and moved from Bridlington with her parents to her mother’s hometown, Pocklington. Young Ann’s marriage lasted no time at all. Thomas died in 1884.

I don’t know what happened to the boy EDWARDS over the next twenty years but in 1891 Ann and two of the girls were living in The Balk, Pocklington, and her parents not far away in Percy Road. Lily had gone up to Scotland on a visit.

As chance had it, Pocklington’s GP was Dr. Alexander Ferrier Angus FAIRWEATHER, born in Holland to the Reverend Robert of that ilk who, for four years, led the Scottish Church in Rotterdam.

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Dr. Alexander’s eldest son Robert, also a medical man, born in Balfron (Stirling), married Lily NICOLL in Pocklington in 1893. Death cut that marriage short too. I haven’t established when or where the younger Robert FAIRWEATHER died – best fit is Tynemouth in 1897, aged 32 – but at the 1901 Census widow Lily was working as a school matron in London.

Lily’s grandmother, Ann née LINWOOD, died in Pocklington shortly after the 1891 census was taken, and John SLEIGH followed her to the next world five years later. In 1901 Ann EDWARDS was settling into Mount Pleasant, Robin Hood’s Bay, with unmarried daughters Annie and Bessie, (now going by “Nita” and “Bettie”). This section of the village today has three stretches of road designated Mount Pleasant North, South and East and there is little chance of identifying the Edwards house. But this image from the Francis Frith Company will give an idea of what it was like then. Not so distinguished now. (Photo: Google Street View.)

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At the 1911 Census, Ann and daughters Lily and Bessie (once again) are together at Mount Pleasant. I don’t know what happened to Annie but I did catch up with William Walter EDWARDS, now a cashier at a paper mill in Tamworth, married to Mary Frances née RANFORD, with a daughter Alicia Clare, 7, and son Raymund Walter, 5. Both children were born in the area from which their step-grandmother had hailed.

North of the border, the FAIRWEATHERs had celebrated their triumphs and endured some tragedies. Dr. Alexander’s older brother, John Bisset, born in Rotterdam, died aged 60 after a swift and sad decline, his health possibly affected by 13 years spent on a coffee plantation in India. His sister, Isabella Guthrie married a soldier and gave birth to her third child on the sub-continent – and died aged 27 when the wee lad was just two years old.

And what of Amen Corner? The mother in law of the first Alexander Ferrier Angus was Margaret LOW  of Stonehaven and he agreed to his second child being christened Margaret Eliza Low FAIRWEATHER.  If you are of a certain age (and British) you will understand why I was triggered.

Most of the folk mentioned in this post can be found on FamilySearch.

Ghost Story

A couple of posts earlier this month, Balaclava and The Missing Parson, featured some STORYs. I revisited them yesterday to tie up some of their loose ends on FamilySearch.

The stone remembering Elizabeth Alice STORY is in a sorry state. The Crimlisks in their 1977 survey noted it was broken…

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The carved lettering is very distinctive, appearing on only one other headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, as far as I’m aware – that of Elizabeth Alice’s parents and brothers Henry Errington and William. This one reads:-

In affectionate remembrance of ELIZABETH ALICE, the beloved wife of THOMAS MATTHEW EDWARDS, daughter of WILLIAM STORY, who died at Bridlington, October 26th 1880, aged 29.

She was buried in Bridlington and to give her such a substantial memorial in the town of her birth is quite a statement. Her only child, Walter William, was four months shy of his seventh birthday when she died. He would acquire a step-mother around the time he turned eight.

After adding a source or two to Elizabeth Alice’s record on FamilySearch I checked to see if she had any duplicates. There was just one and it was quite startling – of Elizabeth Alice STOREY, with the same birth and death years and a husband with the surname EDWARDS, the marriage taking place, it appears, about the same time. Very clearly, they were “not a match”. This other Elizabeth had entered the world in Hants Harbour, Newfoundland, and departed from the same place. The location rang a bell, though, so I looked again at the biography of Filey Elizabeth’s brother, George Philliskirk STORY.

…Following three probationary years as an assistant in the two St John’s [Newfoundland] circuits, Story was ordained in 1880. That summer he married the daughter of John Steer, a leading merchant in the city. The next eight years were spent in hard and onerous labour as a circuit preacher around the island: at Channel (Channel-Port aux Basques), Hant’s Harbour and Catalina on Trinity Bay, and Freshwater on Conception Bay.

Spooky, huh?

Elizabeth Alice the First

Elizabeth Alice the Second