Another Guesswork Wife

The mother of the Sellers boys (yesterday’s post) is Sarah McLAREN on Filey Genealogy & Connections. This Sarah is given the same dates and children as Sarah WILSON, the rightful wife of Robert senior.

The McLarens offer wider horizons than the Wilsons. This isn’t immediately apparent if you have clicked the link to Sarah M. Three other children of David McLaren and Jane SMURFOOT married, but it is Hannah who connects to several Filey families with interesting, though not extensive, pedigrees. She married into the BRAMBLES, which lead to COULTAS and WATKINSON. And one Thomas COULTAS married a Sarah Jane SELLERS, born only two years or so before a daughter given the same name by Robert Sellers and Sarah Wilson. Most of these connections appear to be reliable.

I wondered this morning who Sarah McLAREN married, if anyone, and was surprised to find her contributing to future generations on the Shared Tree.

Although FG&C has again been found wanting with a guesswork wife fail, Kath offers more people in these families than FST. I will add as many as I can, as and when…

Intruders

It is easy to make mistakes when compiling family trees but, when whoppers are made on FamilySearch, “the system” usually issues a caution. Not in this case –

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My persons of interest here are William George LONG and his wife, Hannah Elizabeth Susan HEADLEY. There are two headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard, side by side. One remembers William and Hannah’s seven-year-old daughter, Kate Mary. The other lists four of their grandchildren who died in infancy, including a second Kate Mary, but this one a RICKARD, who died aged 7 months. They were children of Hannah Maria LONG and “Billy Ricky”, who ran the chemist shop that still plies the trade at the corner of Murray Street and West Avenue, now as Boots but previously Whitfield’s.

Hannah Elizabeth was a daughter of Morris HEADLEY and Ann DOEG who seem to appear twice in the screenshot. The couple to the left is correctly positioned chronologically and between them and the would be “older” pair is their son (possibly) and his wife Anna Maria Bridgnell WALMSLEY. This couple married in Gateshead but as you can see from the screenshot Anna gave her birthplace as Dudley in a census. They were both some distance from home. My task now is to put them in their proper place, before I upload the headstone photos as Memories – and remove the duplicate Morris and Ann pairing.

I miss the ramson carpets that cover the floors of Coalbrookdale’s coppices and woods at this time of year. There are some small patches of wild garlic (aka “stinking lily”) in Filey, like this one by Black Cliff Steps, photographed on May Day. A poor man’s madeleine, of sorts.

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After the Workhouse

I returned to the John Stork Problem this morning. It isn’t going to be resolved anytime soon.

I did some more delving and found a snippet of pedigree that gave the cuckoo in the Filey Stork nest the correct parents – Henry and Hannah NETTLETON – but hasn’t yet married John to Hannah STEEL.

I also found “Right John” (after the system had initially denied his existence and I’d created an ID for him). This seems to do a good job of the children he had with Sarah HARPER but also gives him an earlier wife called Sarah TWINHAM. She has borne three children after her death but there’s another reason for her being “iffy”. I think she married a Thomas PICKERSGILL in York.

John’s true first wife, Sarah HARPER, gave birth to eight children before dying in 1864 aged just 37. FamilySearch Tree gives her mother’s name as “Mrs Margaret Harper”. In looking to confirm this, I turned up several christening records of Sarah and siblings being born to Robert Harper and Rebecca.

Five Harper children were born in Bridlington between 1818 and 1830 but I have only been able to find two of them in the 1841 census. Sarah, 15, and her younger brother Richard, 12, are in the Bridlington Workhouse. They are not listed together in the enumerator’s book, but their ages fit very well with their christening dates. What became of the parents and other children?

Sarah may have been resourceful, or perhaps life dealt her some better cards in her later teenage years. She met agricultural labourer John Stork and married him in 1849 when she was 23 years old. At the 1851 census, they are recorded in High Street, Bridlington, with their first child, Emily.

Their youngest child, Sarah, was only two years old when mother Sarah died. John married again the next year. Ann CHAPMAN may have been a good stepmother, and in 1871 she was also caring for Fanny CHAPMAN, a nurse child. This may have been the daughter of a brother because a birth registration for Fanny gives the infant’s mother’s maiden name as WATKINSON.

John and Sarah Harper’s seventh child, Rebecca (perhaps named after her grandmother), married John MOORE, a fisherman who later worked as a brickmaker’s labourer.

They had eleven children, of whom nine reached adulthood. John and Rebecca are remembered on a handsome stone in St Oswald’s churchyard. It stands quite close to the grave of Rebecca’s Uncle Robert Stork. Her father, “Right John”, has a Filey burial record but no known grave.

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A Companion for Today’s Robin

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I snapped this chaffinch in Crescent Gardens this morning and didn’t notice its warty feet until I processed the photo. It seems finches of several species are prone to Fringilla papillomavirus (FPV). The condition is also called papillomatosis or, colloquially, fur foot or bumblefoot. The “warts” don’t seem to affect the general health of the birds but may accumulate to such a degree that perching becomes problematic – and feet are sometimes lost.

Brother John

Robert STORK, son of Luke and husband of Margaret CHAPMAN and Rachel HUMPHREY, (and Filey’s Bellman for 28 years), had a younger brother, John.

John appears on the FamilySearch Tree as Robert’s brother and married to Anna STEEL. In Kath’s database, Filey Genealogy & Connections, brother John has two wives, Sarah HARPER and Ann CHAPMAN.

(There is another pedigree in FamilySearch Genealogies supplied by James Mutzelburg that favours John marrying “Hannah”.)

In the Bridlington Parish Church marriage register, the father of Hannah Steel is given as William, a miller. John’s father is Henry, a labourer. If this record is accepted at face value, this John is not Robert the Bellman’s brother.

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Eight years after the wedding, in High Street Bridlington, William Steel is living with his daughter and son in law, and two of their children – George and Jane Ann. William gives his birthplace as Eastrington. I think he is the William christened at Laxton, near Goole, in January 1794, the son of Robert and Elizabeth. A Burton Agnes marriage in 1817 to Elizabeth MASSENDER is possibly the union of this John’s parents.

The other John married Sarah HARPER in 1849 and two years later she gives her birthplace as Haisthorpe, near Burton Agnes. Sarah’s parents were possibly Robert and Rebecca.

To give you the two sets of children now would be confusing. I’ll just say that FST John may have had more children than he is given and some of those listed appear to have wayward birth years. Kath hasn’t given Luke Stork’s son John all his children either. I found two more.

The two Johns had one thing in common. They were both familiar with the inside of the same magistrate’s court.

FST John first…

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In 1871, John and Hannah gave their address as “The Hall, Haisthorpe”. Thirteen miles away, John is enumerated in King Street with five of his children and a nurse child, Frances CHAPMAN. His second wife, Ann Chapman, (not the mother of Frances), was away on census night. The household also contained a lodger, John McGURK, an Irish bootmaker.

And just down the street lived brother Robert and second wife Rachel Humphrey.

Bellman

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Photographer unknown, no date, courtesy Filey Museum

His headstone tells us that Robert STORK was Filey’s bellman for 28 years. The privilege of crying out the town news cost him, in today’s money, about £3,000. I’ve based this figure on a Local Board meeting report that Thomas WEBB had offered £1 7s 6d for the position of Town Crier, “a similar sum to that paid by the previous bellman, Robert STORK”. That was in 1902 and confirmation that Robert had just retired from the post is found in a news item of 1895:-

Filey’s aged and famed bellman, who in March will attain his 73rd birthday, whilst in August next he will attain his majority, having acted by that time for 21 years as bellman, proposed the health of Mr. Nicholson…

Thomas Webb, thrice married, had taken Robert’s daughter Mary Ann for his second wife.

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In loving memory of ROBERT STORK who died Sep 5th 1904, aged 82 years. For 28 years Town Crier.

‘His end was peace’

Also MARGARET his wife, who died Feb 2nd 1869, aged 49 years

‘Not dead, but sleepeth’

Also ELIZABETH their daughter, who died Dec 18th 1857, aged 6 years

‘She fell asleep in Jesus’

Also RACHEL STORK, wife of the above who died Nov 27 1909, aged 87 years

‘Prepare to meet thy God’

On FamilySearch Tree, Thomas is waiting for his third wife – and Robert’s brother John seems to be an impostor. I’m not quite sure how to deal with him as he has living descendants in America. I’ll make a case for the rightful brother and present it here in a day or two.

A Boy Named Allison

In 1881, the census enumerator identified the head of a Mariners Place household as “Harrison Mason”. I think this must have been a mistake. At Charleston Farm, Boynton, in 1851, Allison was a 17-year-old farm servant, bunking down with several other young men. In 1871, working as an agricultural labourer, he was at home with his parents in Thwing, his given age 35, his status unmarried, and his name again, unashamedly, Allison.

Two doors away that year, John BENTLEY, hind to Mrs BARUGH, (for whom Allison had worked twenty years earlier), was playing host to his sister in law, Barbara BOWMAN. Barbara’s sister, Mrs Bentley, was on this census night some miles away, under her parents’ roof in Filey – in Mariners Place.

One can’t help being a little intrigued, especially as the enumerator wrote that Barbara was unmarried.

Barbara HUGILL had married Francis Bowman in 1860. He may have died in the first years of the marriage – I haven’t yet found his death registration – but, towards the end of 1879, widow Bowman married Allison Mason in Little Driffield. Barbara’s father had died a couple of years earlier and at the 1881 census “Harrison Mason” shared his home with mother in law Mary. The 76-year-old lady paid her way, working as a laundress with Barbara. Allison was now working as a “general labourer”. He didn’t quite make it to the next census.

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In affectionate remembrance of ALLISON MASON, the beloved husband of BARBARA MASON of Filey who died April 3rd 1890, aged 56 years.

‘Be ye also ready for in such an hour

As ye think not, the Son of man cometh’

 

Also of BARBARA MASON, the beloved wife of the above who died March 18th 1903, aged 65 years.

‘Leave this world without a tear, save for the friends

I loved so dear. To heal their sorrows, Lord

Descend and to the friendless prove a friend’

 

Also THOMAS HUGILL, father of the above BARBARA MASON, who died Nov 19th 1879, aged 77 years.

Also MARY his beloved wife, who died Nov 16th 1886, aged 83 years.

‘Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.

Yeah, saith the spirit, that they may rest

From their labours’

I don’t think Barbara had any children with her two husbands but there was another boy named Allison in this part of Yorkshire, briefly. The registrations of his birth and death are found in the first quarter of 1877, in Driffield. His father was John MASON, his mother Sarah DOBSON, but I haven’t yet found the family connection to the older Allison – which must surely exist.

Find the Allison who grew to be a man on FST.

The Smiths

One William SMITH married Jane NEWTON in Bridlington on 1 June 1765. They had two daughters, Jane born in 1766 in Bridlington and Harriet taking her first breath 22 years later in Scarborough. This is what Filey Genealogy & Connections suggests.

FamilySearch offers a similar story.

It would appear that I made some changes on FST a while ago that agreed on Harriet being their child but I didn’t add baby Jane, even though she “fits” better, born a year after the marriage of her parents.

Harriet’s mother heads one of the households in Roe’s Buildings, Filey, in 1841. Her age, however, is given as “80”, making her four years old in 1765. The first major British census was somewhat cavalier when noting ages but in 1849 a local newspaper had the following death notice:-

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The civil registration agrees that Jane was 91 when she died.

I have looked in vain for another William Smith who married a Jane but, obviously, I must make some changes on FST.

Harriet is with her mother in Roe’s Buildings under her married name, AGAR. Her husband drowned in Plymouth Harbour in 1816. The couple is remembered on their headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, with Michael’s sister, Zillah.

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“Sleeping” next to Harriet is her sister, Sarah, wife of Jeremiah HUDSON.

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In Memory of SARAH, wife of JEREMIAH HUDSON, Scarborough, Master Mariner, and daughter of WILLIAM and JANE SMITH, who departed this life 11th day of July 1844, aged 52 years.

Sarah is also resident at Roe’s Buildings in 1841, her age given as 45. I thought Sarah must be a widow too but further research found her husband enumerated seven miles away in Scarborough, living alone in Sand Side. He was a sailor and the separation may have been one of convenience. I’m perhaps being charitable because a few months after  Sarah’s death his first child with Jane BROADRICK was born in London. I’ll write more about Jeremiah another time but there is a post on the first Looking at Filey blog, Fisherman Smacked, that might serve to introduce him, though it contains some errors of fact and interpretation. He is on FST with his second wife and their brood but two appearances with Sarah only give the marriage.

The fourth elderly lady at Roe’s buildings was widow Elizabeth BROWN. Three years older than Jane, she may have been her sister. That could be a clue to Jane’s identity – but I haven’t found Elizabeth’s marriage yet. Elizabeth is resting eternally next to Michael Agar and Harriet.

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In memory of ELIZABETH BROWN of Scarborough, widow, who died 17th November 1843, aged 85 years.

Elsewhere…

The “deal” that was so good for the Eurocrats has been dismissed in the UK parliament.  Terrific, but Dr Steve has more confidence than I have that Brexit will happen this year. Styx (‘ware F-bombs) gives some reasons why wanting to remain in the EU makes little sense.