Remembering Forgetful Emily

20191022EmilyBPunknownWhen Emily’s husband of 21 years filled out the 1911 census form, he owned up to not knowing where she had been born. John CAPPLEMAN, 50, had been a fish hawker for much of his working life. Emily was running a newsagent business from their home at 55 Queen Street.

Ten years earlier the enumerator had written “don’t know” in the space for Emily’s birthplace, and didn’t give her an occupation.

In 1891 they had been married for about eighteen months and were living in Cambridge Yard, West Street. John was working as both a fisherman and a hawker of the creatures he caught. In the enumerator’s book, “Newcastle on Tyne” is given as Emily’s birthplace.

In 1881, Emily was with her older brother John, visiting a married sister in Kent. Jane Ann’s husband, Alexander FAIRBROTHER, was a farmer with radical inclinations. He gave two of his sons the middle names Cobden and Bright. The birthplace of the three Dawson siblings was given as “Shields, Northumberland”.

In 1871, at home with their parents in Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, all six Dawsons in residence offered North Shields as their birthplace, even though mother Jane (formerly BIRBECK) had been born in York.

In 1861, Errington “DAUSON” and Jane were enumerated at 13, Dockwray Square, with six children born in North Shields (and their mother in her rightful birthplace).

Errington Dawson was a butcher and his son John became a shipowner. The family was clearly settled in North Shields and although several of Emily’s siblings died in infancy there is no obvious reason why she would choose to forget her roots in later years.

Why did she move to Scarborough during the 1880s? In 1888 a list of bankrupts was published in the local paper and there was an Emily Dawson among them. If this was “our Emily” she had failed to make a go of keeping a lodging-house. The following year she married John Cappleman. They were together for thirty years but didn’t have any children.

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I had to create an ID for Emily. Her parents already had representation on the Shared Tree but were waiting for me to play matchmaker. There are other nuptials to be noted and quite a few missing children created. The gathering of these has been made easier by a contributor to the new Find My Past system of sharing trees. For now, though, Emily doesn’t have much of a family on FamilySearch.

The Jackson Eight

Robert JACKSON, a butcher and farmer in Lebberston, had eight children with Elizabeth CLEMIT. Though both parents lived to a good age, the young ones fared less well. Three died before the age of ten, and two daughters reached their mid-twenties. Eliza seems to have been the only one to marry, and she died before her fortieth year. William’s last birthday was his sixtieth. I’m not sure yet when Charles departed this life, or if he married, but on FamilySearch Tree, he was trafficked to another couple in a distant part of the country. He was put there by “the system” so I had no compunction about rescuing him.

In St Oswald’s churchyard, there are three headstones, side by side, that remember six of the children plus their parents and Elizabeth Clemit’s father, Charles. Both FamilySearch and Filey Genealogy and Connections had records for just two of the children, so I’ve created IDs for “the missing” and put photographs of the headstones on FST as Memories.

There seems to have been nothing newsworthy about the deaths of the young Jacksons, but George and James died in the same month, December 1857, aged 7 and 4. Ann died in December 1869 and Mary Jane followed her to the grave less than three months later.

Eliza had three daughters with Police Sergeant Henry ALDEN and the middle girl, Bridget, was living with grandparents Robert and Elizabeth in 1891 when she was seventeen. I don’t know what became of her, or her sisters, Emily and Elizabeth.

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Find Robert on FamilySearch Tree.

Friends

Richard BROWNING SMITH faced his manslaughter charge in March 1840, almost nine months after he had killed Michael COOK. On the advice of his counsel and friends, he withdrew his Not Guilty plea, pleaded Guilty instead and awaited his fate. His defence called a number of “witnesses of character” and the Learned Judge chose not to commit Richard to prison but to impose a fine of £20 instead. This was immediately paid and Richard walked free. The life of Michael Cook was clearly worth less than the proverbial sheep or lamb.

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I looked for Richard on FamilySearch Tree. I knew from the Coroner’s Inquest report that he was a butcher in Coggeshall and thought he would be easy to find. I soon happened upon a Richard BROWNING and a Richard Browning SMITH, both born in the town about 1814, and both butchers. You can find them on FST. This Richard seems the one more likely to have ended the captain’s life. His wife Sophia died in 1864. At the 1871 census, Richard’s 79-year-old mother in law, a nephew and niece were living with him in East Street. Ten years later he had “Mary B” to look after him – a second wife almost 30 years his junior.

I’m not sure what to make of Lucy COOK marrying a butcher in Filey.