Delville Wood

I haven’t been able to establish exactly when and where Tom CHAPMAN sustained the wounds from which he died, on this day 1916. He was serving in the 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment and the following extract from a snowdenhouse article places him at Longueval four days earlier.

On the 23rd a joint operation by the 3rd and 5th Divisions was put into action. Both Divisions attacked from the west of Longueval with the 3rd Division on the right and the 5th Division on the left. At 3:40 am the 1st Northumberland Fusiliers advanced followed by the 13th Kings and 12th West Yorks. They made good progress advancing through the northern part of Longueval and into Delville Wood itself, until they came up against heavy machine-gun fire from the front and left. They were forced to fall back at first to Piccadilly Street and then to Pont Street. Two other battalions captured a German strong point close to the Orchard in the north of the village but after being heavy counter attacked they were also forced to retire.

“Piccadilly Street” is the road north out of the village, so I think Tom may have fallen in the area circled on the Google Earth satellite image below.

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He was taken to a nearby casualty receiving station and then, perhaps, moved to a hospital where he died.

The Battle for Delville Wood was a bitterly fought affair and South African units particularly suffered enormous casualties. Graham Leslie McCallum writes about his grandfather’s experiences on the Western Front here. Scroll down until you see photographs of Longueval and Delville, which may change the pictures you have in your mind of a French village and wood in summer.

Tom was buried in La Neuville British Cemetery, Corbie, which is about 30 km west of Longueval. He is remembered on a family grave in St Oswald’s; he has the left-hand kerb and older brother Frank the right.

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Memories of FRANK CHAPMAN, died 28 Dec 1926, aged 38.

And TOM CHAPMAN, died of wounds in France, 27 July 1916, aged 20.

Tom is on the FamilySearch Tree.

‘Lady Shirley’ revisited

Seventy years ago, four Filey fishermen drowned when their boat overturned off Primrose Valley. Auxiliary coastguard Eddie BELT, on bad-weather watch on Carr Naze, saw what happened through binoculars and raised the alarm. Eddie would later say that one of the fishermen had made it to the beach, had shaken himself and walked back into the waves. (This information from Ben Jenkinson senior in an audio clip posted to Looking at Filey but not available on the Wayback Machine.) I assume this was Richard Ferguson CAMMISH returning to the upturned boat to rescue his brother. (At the inquest a couple of weeks later, the Coroner would pay tribute to a Leeds man, Sidney Leonard Moon, who stripped and went into the sea “in a vain attempt to rescue the fishermen”.) Richard’s body was never found. His brother was buried in St Oswald’s churchyard, with  Francis CAMMISH and William Robinson JENKINSON, on 3rd July.

The four men were fourth cousins; the brothers two of three sons born to Robert “Codge” CAMMISH and Mary Emily Simpson WATKINSON. In the photo below they are standing together beside their elder sister, Mary Margaret. The little girl is Annie Elizabeth. Her father named his boat after her. Girl Annie is one of the Filey fishing boats memorialized on the Promenade.

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Courtesy  Ian Robert Cammish via Kath Wilkie

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There is only one boat that goes salmoning regularly now. I photographed it this morning and have added an arrow pointing to Primrose Valley. Lady Shirley capsized about fifty yards from the beach.

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There are two posts about the tragedy on Looking at Filey, Lady Shirleyand A Cammish Family.

The four fishermen are on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Francis ‘Frankie Tosh’ Cammish

Richard Ferguson ‘Tosh’ Cammish

William Watkinson ‘Codge’ Cammish

William Robinson ‘Billy Wemp’ Jenkinson

I have created records for the brothers on FamilySearch Tree.

Richard

William

Duckling News

The 2016 brood on the boating lake lived for about five days; the unfortunates in 2017 less than that. This year, six ducklings soon became five but the surviving quintet is now 11 days old and looking well. The mother appears under-protective. Maybe previous experience has lowered her expectations. The father paid his family a brief visit a couple of days ago. He looked rough on the prow of his canoe.

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Yawl ‘Trio’

SH76 Trio was built by Robert SKELTON in Scarborough in 1859. Her first owners were three of the TINDALL family, Alexander, William and James; shipbuilder, sailmaker, and banker respectively. The last change of ownership noted by Captain Syd was in 1881, four Scarborough fishermen, Robert ALLEN senior & junior, James and John ALLEN, took possession. At some point thereafter Thomas Avery JOHNSON became skipper and he was aboard with two of his sons in 1895 when a gale blew up in the North Sea, off Spurn Point. The crew on a passing  Hull boat saw three of Trio’s fishermen washed overboard by a huge wave but could do nothing to effect a rescue.

The six men on board Trio were all from Filey and a pall fell over the town when news of her difficulties was received.

British Armed Forces and Overseas Deaths and Burials (The National Archives) gives 14 May as the date of the men’s demise. Five are remembered on headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard. Two are recorded as having been lost in the gale of 16 and 17 May, and the three JOHNSONs as having drowned on the 16th.

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Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN
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Francis CAMMISH
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Thomas Avery, Francis Cappleman, and William JOHNSON

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Cappleman, M (Wiggy) 1891‘Matty Wiggy’ CAPPLEMAN played for the Filey Red Stars FC and was photographed with the team in 1891 when he was 18-years-old. The insurance money from the benefit clubs was supplemented by local fund-raising events. The following was noted in The Scarborough Mercury on Friday 30th August 1895.

Dr. Spark, the Leeds City Organist, gave a very charming recital at Filey Church on Monday for the benefit of the widows and orphans of the fishermen lost in the Trio. The collection realized between £5 and £6. The programme was com­posed of some of the choicest illustrations of the gems of Silas, Tours, Mendelssohn, and Gounod, and Dr. Spark gave two or three of his own com­positions, which were very much appreciated. “The Vesper Hymn” and the finale introducing national themes by Purcell, Arne, and Dr. Bull afforded the veteran musician an opportunity of showing his wonderful skill as an executant and of displaying the passion and dramatic instinct which have always characterized his playing.

There were only two of the lost six on FamilySearch Tree when I looked a few days ago and in the process of gathering in the others I ran into some difficulties. I had hoped to point you to more complete pedigrees!

Francis Cappleman JOHNSON

Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN

Robert EDMOND was the member of the crew without a remembrance in the churchyard – and he isn’t represented yet on FST. Find him on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Dr. SPARK, a Devon man, makes a couple of appearances on FST – but as an only child without a mother. At the 1881 Census, he was living in Eccleshill, Bradford, with wife Elizabeth and son Thomas, age 23 and a law student. William Spark died in Leeds less than two years after his Filey recital.

[S. S.] Wesley’s articled pupil from his Exeter days, William Spark (1823-97) went with him to Leeds where he became Organist of St. George’s and then, after designing the Town Hall organ, Borough Organist from 1859 to 1897. His brother Frederick was a guiding light of the Leeds Triennial Festival and William played at each Festival between 1874 and 1886. Grove’s Dictionary dismisses his compositions as “numerous but unimportant”. Unimportant or not, they were nevertheless widely performed. His oratorio Immanuel figured in the Leeds Festival of 1877 and Spark’s recitals in and around Doncaster in the 1870s and 1880s (he appeared in the town as early as February 1853, conducting thirty voices of his own Leeds Madrigal and Motet Society) included his Concertstuck, a Fantasie and (several times) Variations and Fugue on Jerusalem the Golden, also solo songs and excerpts from Immanuel. Spark’s Yorkshire Exhibition March was written in 1875 for the grand organ in the Exhibition building. He wrote and lectured tirelessly, his lecture subjects in Doncaster at that same period including “The Vocal Music of the Victorian Era“, “The Minstrelsy of Old England“, “National Ballad Music of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales” and “Glees and Partsongs“, the illustrations for the latter talk including at least one of his own compositions. He edited books of music by others for organists to play.

Source.

William Cammish, 13

John and Richard CAMMISH, who drowned from Unity in 1892, were aged 7 and 9 when their older brother was lost.

William was one of two boys on SH95 Zillah & Rachel, a yawl built in Scarborough, fishing on the Dogger, this day 1865.

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Grave D345, St Oswald’s, Filey.

Also of WILLIAM, son of the above, who was drowned at sea, May 9th 1865, aged 13 years.

‘He must slumber in the deep

His body there will rest

Till summoned with his soul

To bloom and be forever blest.’

William on FamilySearch Tree.

Herring Coble ‘Unity’

The Driffield Times reported on 30 April 1892:-

After having enjoyed spring-like weather for a little while, an unwelcome change took place on Wednesday morning [27th], when it rained and blew incessantly. The weather and wind having changed toward evening, it being fine and pleasant, some of our fishing craft ventured to the fishing ground, and had already got a great many miles from land, when a sudden gale sprung up about four the next morning, a strong north wind blowing accompanied by heavy seas.

The small boats and a couple of larger herring cobles turned for home as soon as the weather “looked treacherous”. Two of the vessels needed the assistance of the lifeboat to get home safely. The skipper of Tally Ho! reported that they had been in the company of a third herring coble and great concern was shown for its crew. The boat was still missing on the morning of Friday (29th).

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SH87 Unity was  ­40 feet long and weighed 20 tons. Although described above as a Scarborough boat, Captain Syd notes that Thomas COWLING of Filey shared ownership with  John REYNOLDS and Arthur Harrison SELLERS. The database gives the lost-with-all hands-date as 25th April but that may be my digitization error! The official Overseas Deaths and Burials record gives the 28th April and this date appears on the headstone of John and Richard’s parents.

Unity

Also of JOHN AND RICHARD, sons of the above, & EDMUND ROSS JENKINSON, son-in-law, who were lost at sea, April 28th 1892, aged 36, 34 and 30 years.

‘In the midst of life we are in death.’

You can easily navigate to the three men on Filey Genealogy & Connections, from John CAMMISH senior.

Bean, G 1891George BEAN was an incomer to Filey, born in one of the Hecks (Great or Little), near Selby. He is on FG&C but I suspect he has been given the wrong mother there.  You can see, though, that his father in law is ‘Unity Jack’ CRIMLISK, after whom the doomed herring coble was presumably named. The image of him (left) was taken in 1891 in his guise of Treasurer of Filey Red Stars Football Club.

SH140 Tally Ho!, mentioned in the Driffield Times report, was lost in Filey Bay on 8th December 1892.

Coble ‘Annie’

Filey Bay was a millpond this morning. Ninety-nine years ago it claimed two lives.

Three men in the coble Annie were returning from the crabbing grounds at about 10.30 am when the tideway, racing strongly round the end of Filey Brigg, tipped them over. The youngest of the three at age 27, John LANE, who had only just been demobilized, clung to the upturned boat and was rescued by Richard Cammish JENKINSON in the coble Sunstar. Matthew Jenkinson CAMMISH, 65,  and Mortimer SCALES, 42, were swept away and their bodies never found.

The drama had been watched from the shore by helpless local folk and early season visitors. Everyone’s thoughts must have turned to the loss of seven Filey men from the drifter Emulator the previous week.

Matthew isn’t represented on FamilySearch Tree but you can find his pedigree on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

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Mortimer SCALES has a pedigree on FST that varies somewhat from FG&C. If each is carefully checked and verified they can possibly be merged without too much difficulty.

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I haven’t yet been able to trace the rescued John LANE.

A Chance Connection

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This morning’s sun was a glory so I carried on walking south to Reighton. Only a few hours have passed since I happened upon this stone but I can’t remember exactly where I saw it! Near the track up to The Bay, maybe. The date puzzled me. I have passed this way several times recently and not noticed the stone. Perhaps it was buried in the sand for over a year and the last storm scoured it out.

The lovingly remembered parents are not on FamilySearch, and as they were both born less than a hundred years ago I will leave it to the family to put them on the World Tree. Margaret’s mother was a CAMMISH, the second most populous family in Filey Genealogy and Connections so you can check out her pedigree here.

I photographed Mary Margaret’s headstone last summer.  ‘Dick’ LOVITT was a Hunts Cyclist who settled in Filey and started the fish shop in Mitford Street.

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