Action

Although I haven’t yet had a formal response to my message of a few days ago, there has been a great deal of activity in and around the families of the fisherman and the shoemaker on FamilySearch. I am very grateful to whoever has cleared the way for me to put the headstone of William SAYERS and Sarah CHADWICK on the Shared Tree as a memory. Not only has the awkward link between Tunstall/Catterick and Filey been broken, but Susannah and William SAYERS senior have been given their full complement of thirteen children. Four of these have memorials in the churchyard.

The screenshot I posted a few days ago cannot be taken now.

Remembering Forgetful Emily

20191022EmilyBPunknownWhen Emily’s husband of 21 years filled out the 1911 census form, he owned up to not knowing where she had been born. John CAPPLEMAN, 50, had been a fish hawker for much of his working life. Emily was running a newsagent business from their home at 55 Queen Street.

Ten years earlier the enumerator had written “don’t know” in the space for Emily’s birthplace, and didn’t give her an occupation.

In 1891 they had been married for about eighteen months and were living in Cambridge Yard, West Street. John was working as both a fisherman and a hawker of the creatures he caught. In the enumerator’s book, “Newcastle on Tyne” is given as Emily’s birthplace.

In 1881, Emily was with her older brother John, visiting a married sister in Kent. Jane Ann’s husband, Alexander FAIRBROTHER, was a farmer with radical inclinations. He gave two of his sons the middle names Cobden and Bright. The birthplace of the three Dawson siblings was given as “Shields, Northumberland”.

In 1871, at home with their parents in Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, all six Dawsons in residence offered North Shields as their birthplace, even though mother Jane (formerly BIRBECK) had been born in York.

In 1861, Errington “DAUSON” and Jane were enumerated at 13, Dockwray Square, with six children born in North Shields (and their mother in her rightful birthplace).

Errington Dawson was a butcher and his son John became a shipowner. The family was clearly settled in North Shields and although several of Emily’s siblings died in infancy there is no obvious reason why she would choose to forget her roots in later years.

Why did she move to Scarborough during the 1880s? In 1888 a list of bankrupts was published in the local paper and there was an Emily Dawson among them. If this was “our Emily” she had failed to make a go of keeping a lodging-house. The following year she married John Cappleman. They were together for thirty years but didn’t have any children.

G608_CAPPLEMANemily_20120807_fst

I had to create an ID for Emily. Her parents already had representation on the Shared Tree but were waiting for me to play matchmaker. There are other nuptials to be noted and quite a few missing children created. The gathering of these has been made easier by a contributor to the new Find My Past system of sharing trees. For now, though, Emily doesn’t have much of a family on FamilySearch.

“Lord Help Me”

About ten weeks after his Christmas Day wedding, William JENKINSON sailed for the North Sea fishing ground aboard the yawl Jane and Elizabeth, skipper Bayes COWLING. Thirty miles from the coast the lines were cast from the yawl’s coble – and then a “sudden gale sprung up”. (All quotes are from a syndicated report that appeared in many local newspapers around the country.) Many other fishing boats ran for shelter but Captain Cowling, quite reasonably, chose to bring in his lines and their catch before heading for shore. Three of the crew, William Jenkinson, the skipper’s son Thomas Hunter Cowling and William SAYERS, brought in fourteen lines and then went out to haul the remaining seven.

…a fearful sudden sea rose and struck the coble, filling her with water. This caused her soon to upset, throwing the crew into the sea. Whilst they were struggling in the water, Cowling caught hold of a bowl and an oar, Jenkinson two bowls, and Sayers grabbed hold of the coble, which was bottom uppermost, and got upon it. Soon after he was joined by Jenkinson, but Cowling could not reach it. The Captain, who had seen this sad affair, at once ran the yawl towards the men, and whilst passing, Cowling seized hold of a “fender” which hung over the yawl’s side. One of the boys on board got hold of the hair of his head and held him up, whilst his father, the captain, seized a rope and life-belt, which he threw to the two on the coble. His son was then pulled in, and the yawl turned round to the rescue of [the] others, but on getting to the coble, Sayers alone was holding on nearly exhausted. A second sea had washed them off, but fortunately he had again got hold of the coble. Poor Jenkinson, on attempting to do so, fell backwards, exhausted, exclaiming, “Lord help me,” and was never seen again. Jenkinson was about 26 years of age, and has left a young widow, he having been married only three months.

There may be an official record of William’s death somewhere but, lacking his recovered body, there isn’t a civil registration. He isn’t remembered on a stone in the churchyard and he wasn’t with Jane long enough to leave a genetic inheritance.

Jane gave birth to a daughter about four years later, father unknown, and eight years after William’s death she married again and had five children with Thomas JOHNSON.

With the only evidence of his passing being a brief, if widely disseminated, news item, it isn’t too surprising that he has not yet been accurately represented on the FamilySearch Tree.

As I write this, Ann CAPPLEMAN is still William’s wife on FST. One of the blue hints by his name on the pedigree leads to his rightful marriage to Jane CAPPLEMAN. (The women are first cousins, their common ancestors being Thomas CAPPLEMAN and the Jane WEBSTER of Sunday’s post.)

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England Marriages 1538-1973; page image via Find My Past

Jane and Elizabeth

There are several fishing vessels with this name in Captain Smith’s database but none are yawls. There is a yawl called Jane Elizabeth, built in Scarborough in 1867 and registered SH70. The date of first ownership is annoyingly given as“7???” in my digitization of the Captain’s handwritten pages. However, the owners are “Thomas Hunter COWLING & Bayes COWLING, fishermen of Filey & Robert CAMMISH, grocer of Filey”. In Filey Genealogy & Connections, Robert has just the one child, with Jane ELDERS, baptised Jane Elizabeth in August 1861. You can find her on FST. A case, perhaps, of coincidence challenging a possible recording, transcription or digitization error!

 

The Grapes of Death

In the spring of 1861 the SAYERS household in Ocean Place, Filey must have been quite lively. William, a 46-year-old fisherman, had conspired with his wife Susannah née CAPPLEMAN, to bring thirteen children into the world and the ten survivors were all still at home. The eldest, William junior, was 24 and the youngest, Robert Edmond, had been baptised just a couple of months before the census was taken. And yet there was still room for 86 year-old widow, Jane Cappleman née WEBSTER, Susannah’s mother – and grandmother of Ann Cappleman, who married one of the contentious William Jenkinsons of an earlier post.

Five years passed and widow Jane was still able to get out and about. But on a December day in Queen Street, her life came to a sudden end.

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The hatches still stretch almost the full breadth of the footpath. I photographed them this morning.

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Mr ROBINSON, the publican, was Francis, born 1835 in Filey, married to Mary COVERLEY. The couple had just one child in 1865 but three more followed. The birthplace of all four children is given as Sawden (or Sawdon) in Filey Genealogy & Connections, which suggests the family left the town soon after the sad accident. However, when Francis died in 1880 he was buried in St Oswald’s churchyard and is remembered on the headstone of his parents.

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He has a place on the FamilySearch Tree but awaits his wife and children.

Sisters

Ann and Jane CAPPLEMAN were the last of nine children born in Filey to William and Mary née CAMMISH.

Ann married Thomas Bradley BURN in 1860 when she was 27–years old. Thomas died in 1864 and Ann married again in 1868. One of the witnesses at the marriage ceremony at St Oswald’s was Thomas JOHNSON, who had married Ann’s younger sister, Jane, three years earlier.

Jane’s marriage lasted less than seven years. She died in February 1872, leaving just one child, John William, who is referenced in verse on her headstone.

G215_JOHNSONjane_20170429_fst

‘Mourn not for me my friends so dear

I am not lost but sleepeth here

Mourn not for me but pity take

And love my offspring for my sake.’

Ann’s short first marriage also produced just one son, Bradley. A second boy took the BURN family name but arrived long after Thomas Bradley’s death. She then gave birth to five HUNTER children, four boys and a girl, between 1870 and 1881.

Three years after Jane’s death, Thomas JOHNSON married again. Her name? Jane CAPPLEMAN. Between 1876 and 1883, this couple brought five children into the world, four girls and a boy.

The parents of sisters Ann and Jane had about 20 personal identity numbers between them on FamilySearch Tree and I spent an hour or two today merging the duplicates. There is more work to be done but these two generations are now somewhat more approachable.

William CAPPLEMAN, father of Ann and Jane.

You may recall the Ann CAPPLEMAN who featured on the screenshot in Monday’s post.

WilliamWRONGMARRIAGE

Here is the graveyard indication that she did not marry.

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In affectionate remembrance of ANN, daughter of WILLIAM & SARAH CAPPLEMAN,

who died May 18 1879, aged 38 years.

‘The Master is come and calleth

for thee’

I stated confidently on the screenshot, ‘This William married a Jane CAPPLEMAN’, And lo! He was the first husband of the Jane who took the place of Ann’s sister in the marriage bed of Thomas JOHNSON.

But it is also true that in May 1857 at St Oswald’s, William JENKINSON married Ann CAPPLEMAN, as indicated in the screenshot. But he was the son of Matthew and Ann née DONKIN, and she the daughter of Francis and Sarah née JENKINSON. (Matthew and Sarah were first cousins, common ancestors Robert JENKINSON and Margaret TRUCKLES.)

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‘Thy will be done’

In loving memory of WILLIAM JENKINSON, the beloved husband of

ANNIE JENKINSON of Filey, who died Dec 12 1896, aged 60 years.

‘Rest loved one, rest, our loss

Is thy eternal gain’

Also of ANNIE, wife of the above, who died in the Lord Aug 20th 1905, aged 67 years.

‘Thy will be done’

Also CHARLES HUNTER, son in law of the above and beloved husband of

SARAH ANN HUNTER, who was lost at sea March 6 1883, aged 25 years.

‘In the midst of life, we are in death’

This Ann CAPPLEMAN on FamilySearch Tree.

However, for the time being, the mistaken marriage of William Jenkinson and Ann Cappleman can still be found on FST under their duplicate IDs.

I think there is a good chance you are as confused about these various relationships as I have been the past three days. I’ll try to make things a little clearer by telling the story of ‘Wrong’ William’s sad death, and give him his rightful wife, in a day or two.

A Mixed-Up Marriage

The FamilySearch Tree system plays Guesswork Wives occasionally. It is one thing to create a person from an extracted record, and another to marry them off to some random fellow.

WilliamWRONGMARRIAGE

This wrong William JENKINSON does not, at the moment, have any sources attached to him. I hope to put him right over the next few days but it is a tangled web. Three Ann CAPPLEMANs were born in Filey between 1838 and 1841, and three Janes of that ilk between 1843 and 1846. Five William JENKINSONs appeared on the scene between 1836 and 1844. Troublemakers all! (Nobody should be blamed for mix-ups that have occurred already – or may happen with these people in the future.)

The untangling is going to be greatly helped by the St Oswald’s Monumental Inscriptions. I have three headstones already in the queue to support the changes that must be made to the above screenshot. And one of those remembered, Charles HUNTER, should have featured in the March 6th post, The Storm & Jacky Windy.

The families of most of the drowned fishermen have some representation on FST but there wasn’t enough time in the day to fill gaps and make sound connections for this post.

At the 1871 Census, Charles was a 13-year-old fisherman. At 25 he was master of the yawl Amity (SH90), and a casualty of the March ’83 storm.

1883_HUNTERcharles2_NEWS

The William JENKINSON of the screenshot drowned about three months after his wedding. Jane married again, had five children, and died aged 97 in 1941. I’ll write more about them in a future post.