Action

Although I haven’t yet had a formal response to my message of a few days ago, there has been a great deal of activity in and around the families of the fisherman and the shoemaker on FamilySearch. I am very grateful to whoever has cleared the way for me to put the headstone of William SAYERS and Sarah CHADWICK on the Shared Tree as a memory. Not only has the awkward link between Tunstall/Catterick and Filey been broken, but Susannah and William SAYERS senior have been given their full complement of thirteen children. Four of these have memorials in the churchyard.

The screenshot I posted a few days ago cannot be taken now.

Remembering Forgetful Emily

20191022EmilyBPunknownWhen Emily’s husband of 21 years filled out the 1911 census form, he owned up to not knowing where she had been born. John CAPPLEMAN, 50, had been a fish hawker for much of his working life. Emily was running a newsagent business from their home at 55 Queen Street.

Ten years earlier the enumerator had written “don’t know” in the space for Emily’s birthplace, and didn’t give her an occupation.

In 1891 they had been married for about eighteen months and were living in Cambridge Yard, West Street. John was working as both a fisherman and a hawker of the creatures he caught. In the enumerator’s book, “Newcastle on Tyne” is given as Emily’s birthplace.

In 1881, Emily was with her older brother John, visiting a married sister in Kent. Jane Ann’s husband, Alexander FAIRBROTHER, was a farmer with radical inclinations. He gave two of his sons the middle names Cobden and Bright. The birthplace of the three Dawson siblings was given as “Shields, Northumberland”.

In 1871, at home with their parents in Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, all six Dawsons in residence offered North Shields as their birthplace, even though mother Jane (formerly BIRBECK) had been born in York.

In 1861, Errington “DAUSON” and Jane were enumerated at 13, Dockwray Square, with six children born in North Shields (and their mother in her rightful birthplace).

Errington Dawson was a butcher and his son John became a shipowner. The family was clearly settled in North Shields and although several of Emily’s siblings died in infancy there is no obvious reason why she would choose to forget her roots in later years.

Why did she move to Scarborough during the 1880s? In 1888 a list of bankrupts was published in the local paper and there was an Emily Dawson among them. If this was “our Emily” she had failed to make a go of keeping a lodging-house. The following year she married John Cappleman. They were together for thirty years but didn’t have any children.

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I had to create an ID for Emily. Her parents already had representation on the Shared Tree but were waiting for me to play matchmaker. There are other nuptials to be noted and quite a few missing children created. The gathering of these has been made easier by a contributor to the new Find My Past system of sharing trees. For now, though, Emily doesn’t have much of a family on FamilySearch.

“Lord Help Me”

About ten weeks after his Christmas Day wedding, William JENKINSON sailed for the North Sea fishing ground aboard the yawl Jane and Elizabeth, skipper Bayes COWLING. Thirty miles from the coast the lines were cast from the yawl’s coble – and then a “sudden gale sprung up”. (All quotes are from a syndicated report that appeared in many local newspapers around the country.) Many other fishing boats ran for shelter but Captain Cowling, quite reasonably, chose to bring in his lines and their catch before heading for shore. Three of the crew, William Jenkinson, the skipper’s son Thomas Hunter Cowling and William SAYERS, brought in fourteen lines and then went out to haul the remaining seven.

…a fearful sudden sea rose and struck the coble, filling her with water. This caused her soon to upset, throwing the crew into the sea. Whilst they were struggling in the water, Cowling caught hold of a bowl and an oar, Jenkinson two bowls, and Sayers grabbed hold of the coble, which was bottom uppermost, and got upon it. Soon after he was joined by Jenkinson, but Cowling could not reach it. The Captain, who had seen this sad affair, at once ran the yawl towards the men, and whilst passing, Cowling seized hold of a “fender” which hung over the yawl’s side. One of the boys on board got hold of the hair of his head and held him up, whilst his father, the captain, seized a rope and life-belt, which he threw to the two on the coble. His son was then pulled in, and the yawl turned round to the rescue of [the] others, but on getting to the coble, Sayers alone was holding on nearly exhausted. A second sea had washed them off, but fortunately he had again got hold of the coble. Poor Jenkinson, on attempting to do so, fell backwards, exhausted, exclaiming, “Lord help me,” and was never seen again. Jenkinson was about 26 years of age, and has left a young widow, he having been married only three months.

There may be an official record of William’s death somewhere but, lacking his recovered body, there isn’t a civil registration. He isn’t remembered on a stone in the churchyard and he wasn’t with Jane long enough to leave a genetic inheritance.

Jane gave birth to a daughter about four years later, father unknown, and eight years after William’s death she married again and had five children with Thomas JOHNSON.

With the only evidence of his passing being a brief, if widely disseminated, news item, it isn’t too surprising that he has not yet been accurately represented on the FamilySearch Tree.

As I write this, Ann CAPPLEMAN is still William’s wife on FST. One of the blue hints by his name on the pedigree leads to his rightful marriage to Jane CAPPLEMAN. (The women are first cousins, their common ancestors being Thomas CAPPLEMAN and the Jane WEBSTER of Sunday’s post.)

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England Marriages 1538-1973; page image via Find My Past

Jane and Elizabeth

There are several fishing vessels with this name in Captain Smith’s database but none are yawls. There is a yawl called Jane Elizabeth, built in Scarborough in 1867 and registered SH70. The date of first ownership is annoyingly given as“7???” in my digitization of the Captain’s handwritten pages. However, the owners are “Thomas Hunter COWLING & Bayes COWLING, fishermen of Filey & Robert CAMMISH, grocer of Filey”. In Filey Genealogy & Connections, Robert has just the one child, with Jane ELDERS, baptised Jane Elizabeth in August 1861. You can find her on FST. A case, perhaps, of coincidence challenging a possible recording, transcription or digitization error!

 

The Grapes of Death

In the spring of 1861 the SAYERS household in Ocean Place, Filey must have been quite lively. William, a 46-year-old fisherman, had conspired with his wife Susannah née CAPPLEMAN, to bring thirteen children into the world and the ten survivors were all still at home. The eldest, William junior, was 24 and the youngest, Robert Edmond, had been baptised just a couple of months before the census was taken. And yet there was still room for 86 year-old widow, Jane Cappleman née WEBSTER, Susannah’s mother – and grandmother of Ann Cappleman, who married one of the contentious William Jenkinsons of an earlier post.

Five years passed and widow Jane was still able to get out and about. But on a December day in Queen Street, her life came to a sudden end.

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The hatches still stretch almost the full breadth of the footpath. I photographed them this morning.

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Mr ROBINSON, the publican, was Francis, born 1835 in Filey, married to Mary COVERLEY. The couple had just one child in 1865 but three more followed. The birthplace of all four children is given as Sawden (or Sawdon) in Filey Genealogy & Connections, which suggests the family left the town soon after the sad accident. However, when Francis died in 1880 he was buried in St Oswald’s churchyard and is remembered on the headstone of his parents.

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He has a place on the FamilySearch Tree but awaits his wife and children.

Sisters

Ann and Jane CAPPLEMAN were the last of nine children born in Filey to William and Mary née CAMMISH.

Ann married Thomas Bradley BURN in 1860 when she was 27–years old. Thomas died in 1864 and Ann married again in 1868. One of the witnesses at the marriage ceremony at St Oswald’s was Thomas JOHNSON, who had married Ann’s younger sister, Jane, three years earlier.

Jane’s marriage lasted less than seven years. She died in February 1872, leaving just one child, John William, who is referenced in verse on her headstone.

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‘Mourn not for me my friends so dear

I am not lost but sleepeth here

Mourn not for me but pity take

And love my offspring for my sake.’

Ann’s short first marriage also produced just one son, Bradley. A second boy took the BURN family name but arrived long after Thomas Bradley’s death. She then gave birth to five HUNTER children, four boys and a girl, between 1870 and 1881.

Three years after Jane’s death, Thomas JOHNSON married again. Her name? Jane CAPPLEMAN. Between 1876 and 1883, this couple brought five children into the world, four girls and a boy.

The parents of sisters Ann and Jane had about 20 personal identity numbers between them on FamilySearch Tree and I spent an hour or two today merging the duplicates. There is more work to be done but these two generations are now somewhat more approachable.

William CAPPLEMAN, father of Ann and Jane.

You may recall the Ann CAPPLEMAN who featured on the screenshot in Monday’s post.

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Here is the graveyard indication that she did not marry.

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In affectionate remembrance of ANN, daughter of WILLIAM & SARAH CAPPLEMAN,

who died May 18 1879, aged 38 years.

‘The Master is come and calleth

for thee’

I stated confidently on the screenshot, ‘This William married a Jane CAPPLEMAN’, And lo! He was the first husband of the Jane who took the place of Ann’s sister in the marriage bed of Thomas JOHNSON.

But it is also true that in May 1857 at St Oswald’s, William JENKINSON married Ann CAPPLEMAN, as indicated in the screenshot. But he was the son of Matthew and Ann née DONKIN, and she the daughter of Francis and Sarah née JENKINSON. (Matthew and Sarah were first cousins, common ancestors Robert JENKINSON and Margaret TRUCKLES.)

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‘Thy will be done’

In loving memory of WILLIAM JENKINSON, the beloved husband of

ANNIE JENKINSON of Filey, who died Dec 12 1896, aged 60 years.

‘Rest loved one, rest, our loss

Is thy eternal gain’

Also of ANNIE, wife of the above, who died in the Lord Aug 20th 1905, aged 67 years.

‘Thy will be done’

Also CHARLES HUNTER, son in law of the above and beloved husband of

SARAH ANN HUNTER, who was lost at sea March 6 1883, aged 25 years.

‘In the midst of life, we are in death’

This Ann CAPPLEMAN on FamilySearch Tree.

However, for the time being, the mistaken marriage of William Jenkinson and Ann Cappleman can still be found on FST under their duplicate IDs.

I think there is a good chance you are as confused about these various relationships as I have been the past three days. I’ll try to make things a little clearer by telling the story of ‘Wrong’ William’s sad death, and give him his rightful wife, in a day or two.

A Mixed-Up Marriage

The FamilySearch Tree system plays Guesswork Wives occasionally. It is one thing to create a person from an extracted record, and another to marry them off to some random fellow.

WilliamWRONGMARRIAGE

This wrong William JENKINSON does not, at the moment, have any sources attached to him. I hope to put him right over the next few days but it is a tangled web. Three Ann CAPPLEMANs were born in Filey between 1838 and 1841, and three Janes of that ilk between 1843 and 1846. Five William JENKINSONs appeared on the scene between 1836 and 1844. Troublemakers all! (Nobody should be blamed for mix-ups that have occurred already – or may happen with these people in the future.)

The untangling is going to be greatly helped by the St Oswald’s Monumental Inscriptions. I have three headstones already in the queue to support the changes that must be made to the above screenshot. And one of those remembered, Charles HUNTER, should have featured in the March 6th post, The Storm & Jacky Windy.

The families of most of the drowned fishermen have some representation on FST but there wasn’t enough time in the day to fill gaps and make sound connections for this post.

At the 1871 Census, Charles was a 13-year-old fisherman. At 25 he was master of the yawl Amity (SH90), and a casualty of the March ’83 storm.

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The William JENKINSON of the screenshot drowned about three months after his wedding. Jane married again, had five children, and died aged 97 in 1941. I’ll write more about them in a future post.

A Filey Shepherd

There were several farms in and around Filey in the 19th century but I don’t think any raised sheep. When Filey Fields Farm went under the hammer in the early 1930s the byres, sheds, and pens were for cattle only. So, any young Filey man wanting to work with sheep had to leave the town.

Robert CAPPLEMAN was born into a fishing family. Two brothers, Thomas and “Jack Wraxer”, negotiated the dangers of this dangerous occupation, as did the father, John Pockley CAPPLEMAN. Robert’s youngest brother, Stephenson, died a soldier in South Africa (see the post Three Soldiers, 30 May).

Robert began his working life as a fisherman. The 1881 census captures him aged 14 following in his dad’s wake. Ten years later he was a servant on Greenhills Farm near Pickering and the following year he married Mary Hannah BERRIMAN from East Lutton. The couple had five children in the first twelve years of married life, as they moved from farm to farm on the Yorkshire Wolds. The last two children, though, were born in Beswick, in 1902 and 1904. Thirty-five years later, Robert was recorded in the 1939 Register in Beswick, aged 72, and still working as a shepherd. His death was registered in December Quarter 1952 in Holderness District, which includes Beswick within its boundaries.

By chance, my bed-time Kindle reading at the moment is Wild Life in a Southern County. I have a copy of the book, picked up at Winchester Market for 25 pence in 1978, about a hundred years after it was published. In Chapter V, Richard Jefferies has this to say about shepherds:-

If any labourers deserve to be paid well, it is the shepherds: upon their knowledge and fidelity the principal profit of a whole season depends on so many farms. On the bleak hills in lambing time the greatest care is necessary; and the fold, situated in a hollow if possible, with the down rising on the east or north, is built as it werer of straw walls, thick and warm, which the sheep soon make hollow inside, and this have a cave in which to nestle.

The shepherd has a distinct individuality, and is generally a much more observant man in his own sphere than the ordinary labourer. He knows every single field in the whole parish, what kind of weather best suits its soil, and can tell you without going within sight of a given farm pretty much what condition it will be found in. Knowledge of this character may seem trivial to those whose days are passed indoors; yet it is something to recollect all the endless fields in several square miles of country. As a student remembers for years the type and paper, the breadth of the margin – can see, as it were, before his eyes the bevel of the binding and hear again the rustle of the stiff leaves of some tall volume which he found in a forgotten corner of a library, and bent over with such delight, heedless of dust and “silverfish” and the gathered odour of years – so the shepherd recalls his books, the fields; for he, in the nature of things, has to linger over them and study every letter: sheep are slow.

When the hedges are grubbed and the grass grows where the hawthorn flowered, still the shepherd can point out to you where the trees stood – here an oak and here an ash. On the hills he has often little to do but ponder deeply, sitting on the turf of the slope, while the sheep graze in the hollow, waiting for hours as they eat their way. Therefore by degrees a habit of observation grows upon him – always in reference to his charge: and if he walks across the parish off duty he still cannot choose but notice how the crops are coming on, and where there is most “keep”. The shepherd has been the last of all to abandon the old custom of long service. While the labourers are restless,there may still be found not a few instances of shepherds whose whole lives have been spent upon one farm. Thus, from the habit of observation and the lapse of years, they often become local authorities; and when a dispute of boundaries or water rights or right of way arises, the question is frequently finally decided by the evidence of such a man.

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St Margaret’s, Beswick, 20 June 2017

Robert’s pedigree on FST is a work in progress. On FG&C he has a “guesswork wife” but his ancestors may be usefully compared with those on the World Tree.

Today’s Image

Two days after the patriotic beach scene was recorded, England was beaten 2 – 1 by Italy in the first group match of the 2014 Fifa World Cup in Brazil. A few days later, Uruguay defeated our lads by the same score. I remember nothing about the third match. A goalless draw with Costa Rica meant an ignominious exit by England in the group stage. National pride this year is at the feet of a relatively young bunch of multi-millionaires. They should do better than the faded “golden generation” last time out. I just hope our traveling supporters have a good time in Russia and come home with a different narrative about the Federation than the shameful one peddled by the United Kingdom regime these past few years.

Three Soldiers

For three young men with Filey connections, a 30th of May would be their last day.

SpionKopSAStephenson Warcup CAPPLEMAN was born in the town in 1872 and, at the age of 28, found himself in “Zululand” with the King’s Royal Rifles. I’m speculating that he was on Spion Kop and at Ladysmith in January but the inscription on the family headstone in St Oswald’s places him at Vryheid at the end of May. Like so many other British soldiers in the Boer War, he succumbed to the enteric fever. (Regimental history online.)

Stephenson is on FST but the system has given him the wrong mother. FG&C seems to be more reliable.

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In loving memory of JOHN P. CAPPLEMAN, who died Feb 26th 1899, aged 57 years.

Also SUSANNA his wife, who died May 24th 1898, aged 60 years.

‘Kind thoughts shall ever linger

Round the graves where they are laid’

Also STEPHENSON W. CAPPLEMAN their son, late King’s R. Rifles, died of enteric fever at Vryheid, South Africa, May 30 1900 aged 28 years.

‘Oh how hard not a friend of his own to be near

To hear his last sigh or to watch his last tear

No parting, no farewell, no fond word of love

To cheer his last moments or point him above’

Richard Haxby PEARSON was born in Chapel Street, Filey in 1895. He has a quite extensive pedigree on FG&C but has yet to be linked to scattered forebears on FST. In the Great War, he served with the second-line 5th Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment and died before he was sent to France in July 1916. I have not found his service records online and he has a civil death registration. I photographed the modest cross in a grey, damp churchyard this afternoon, with the following inscription (in part):-

In loving memory of RICHARD HAXBY PEARSON, the beloved son of FRANK AND MARY PEARSON, died May 30 1916, aged 20 years.

‘Too dearly loved to be forgotten

Died for his country’

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Harry GRANT completes the trio.

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“With pride we remember son of above” has to be set alongside Harry’s very sparse Index entry at CWGC, given that both parents “fell asleep” in the 1950s.

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The family isn’t recorded on FG&C and initial research suggests that Harry was one of three children born to Tom TOWNEND during Hannah COULSON’s first marriage. On the 1911 Census return, he is given as Sam’s son but named as Harry TOWNEND. His birth was registered, as Henry, in Holbeck in the summer of 1899.  Samuel had two natural children in 1911, James (2) and Edna (newborn). Edna would almost make her century.

Even if you have only a short-term memory, the date of Harry’s death may remind you of George DOUGLAS. The 1st Lincolnshires took part in the Third Battle of the Aisne and  Harry GRANT is remembered on the Soissons Memorial. I wonder if Harry met George and swapped Filey reminiscences.

Yawl ‘Trio’

SH76 Trio was built by Robert SKELTON in Scarborough in 1859. Her first owners were three of the TINDALL family, Alexander, William and James; shipbuilder, sailmaker, and banker respectively. The last change of ownership noted by Captain Syd was in 1881, four Scarborough fishermen, Robert ALLEN senior & junior, James and John ALLEN, took possession. At some point thereafter Thomas Avery JOHNSON became skipper and he was aboard with two of his sons in 1895 when a gale blew up in the North Sea, off Spurn Point. The crew on a passing  Hull boat saw three of Trio’s fishermen washed overboard by a huge wave but could do nothing to effect a rescue.

The six men on board Trio were all from Filey and a pall fell over the town when news of her difficulties was received.

British Armed Forces and Overseas Deaths and Burials (The National Archives) gives 14 May as the date of the men’s demise. Five are remembered on headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard. Two are recorded as having been lost in the gale of 16 and 17 May, and the three JOHNSONs as having drowned on the 16th.

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Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN
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Francis CAMMISH
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Thomas Avery, Francis Cappleman, and William JOHNSON

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Cappleman, M (Wiggy) 1891‘Matty Wiggy’ CAPPLEMAN played for the Filey Red Stars FC and was photographed with the team in 1891 when he was 18-years-old. The insurance money from the benefit clubs was supplemented by local fund-raising events. The following was noted in The Scarborough Mercury on Friday 30th August 1895.

Dr. Spark, the Leeds City Organist, gave a very charming recital at Filey Church on Monday for the benefit of the widows and orphans of the fishermen lost in the Trio. The collection realized between £5 and £6. The programme was com­posed of some of the choicest illustrations of the gems of Silas, Tours, Mendelssohn, and Gounod, and Dr. Spark gave two or three of his own com­positions, which were very much appreciated. “The Vesper Hymn” and the finale introducing national themes by Purcell, Arne, and Dr. Bull afforded the veteran musician an opportunity of showing his wonderful skill as an executant and of displaying the passion and dramatic instinct which have always characterized his playing.

There were only two of the lost six on FamilySearch Tree when I looked a few days ago and in the process of gathering in the others I ran into some difficulties. I had hoped to point you to more complete pedigrees!

Francis Cappleman JOHNSON

Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN

Robert EDMOND was the member of the crew without a remembrance in the churchyard – and he isn’t represented yet on FST. Find him on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Dr. SPARK, a Devon man, makes a couple of appearances on FST – but as an only child without a mother. At the 1881 Census, he was living in Eccleshill, Bradford, with wife Elizabeth and son Thomas, age 23 and a law student. William Spark died in Leeds less than two years after his Filey recital.

[S. S.] Wesley’s articled pupil from his Exeter days, William Spark (1823-97) went with him to Leeds where he became Organist of St. George’s and then, after designing the Town Hall organ, Borough Organist from 1859 to 1897. His brother Frederick was a guiding light of the Leeds Triennial Festival and William played at each Festival between 1874 and 1886. Grove’s Dictionary dismisses his compositions as “numerous but unimportant”. Unimportant or not, they were nevertheless widely performed. His oratorio Immanuel figured in the Leeds Festival of 1877 and Spark’s recitals in and around Doncaster in the 1870s and 1880s (he appeared in the town as early as February 1853, conducting thirty voices of his own Leeds Madrigal and Motet Society) included his Concertstuck, a Fantasie and (several times) Variations and Fugue on Jerusalem the Golden, also solo songs and excerpts from Immanuel. Spark’s Yorkshire Exhibition March was written in 1875 for the grand organ in the Exhibition building. He wrote and lectured tirelessly, his lecture subjects in Doncaster at that same period including “The Vocal Music of the Victorian Era“, “The Minstrelsy of Old England“, “National Ballad Music of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales” and “Glees and Partsongs“, the illustrations for the latter talk including at least one of his own compositions. He edited books of music by others for organists to play.

Source.