Missing Children

When William ANNIS filled out the 1911 census form he declared that his wife Mary had given birth to eight living children, of whom seven had subsequently died.

The survivor was Jane Alice (yesterday’s post). I had birth registrations for only three children, Jane 1, Jane 2 (I thought) and William in between. My search for the other five raised only one – a third Jane. This child replaced Survivor Jane but, rather disturbingly, her birth registration precedes the death of Jane 1. In the absence of birth registrations, I hoped to find notifications of the deaths of the missing children. I found nothing.

I looked in newspapers to see if father William had caught the attention of local journalists. The only story I turned up concerned a William Annis in Gloucester. Jane Alice’s father gave his birthplace as Gloucester at census time so, just maybe…

Gloucester Citizen 21 September 1889

Assault on an Old Man

James Goode was summoned by William Annis for assault at Flaxley Meend, on the 10th inst. From evidence it appeared that defendant called complainant, an old man, names, and on the latter threatening to throw a stone at him, he ran at him and gave him a blow on the head. Fined 10s. and costs or 14 days.

Our William would have been 65 at the time, with 22 years and three days of life ahead of him.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM ANNIS, died Sep 13th 1911, aged 87.

Also MARY his wife, died Aug 29th 1913, aged 80

‘At rest’

 

After the Workhouse

I returned to the John Stork Problem this morning. It isn’t going to be resolved anytime soon.

I did some more delving and found a snippet of pedigree that gave the cuckoo in the Filey Stork nest the correct parents – Henry and Hannah NETTLETON – but hasn’t yet married John to Hannah STEEL.

I also found “Right John” (after the system had initially denied his existence and I’d created an ID for him). This seems to do a good job of the children he had with Sarah HARPER but also gives him an earlier wife called Sarah TWINHAM. She has borne three children after her death but there’s another reason for her being “iffy”. I think she married a Thomas PICKERSGILL in York.

John’s true first wife, Sarah HARPER, gave birth to eight children before dying in 1864 aged just 37. FamilySearch Tree gives her mother’s name as “Mrs Margaret Harper”. In looking to confirm this, I turned up several christening records of Sarah and siblings being born to Robert Harper and Rebecca.

Five Harper children were born in Bridlington between 1818 and 1830 but I have only been able to find two of them in the 1841 census. Sarah, 15, and her younger brother Richard, 12, are in the Bridlington Workhouse. They are not listed together in the enumerator’s book, but their ages fit very well with their christening dates. What became of the parents and other children?

Sarah may have been resourceful, or perhaps life dealt her some better cards in her later teenage years. She met agricultural labourer John Stork and married him in 1849 when she was 23 years old. At the 1851 census, they are recorded in High Street, Bridlington, with their first child, Emily.

Their youngest child, Sarah, was only two years old when mother Sarah died. John married again the next year. Ann CHAPMAN may have been a good stepmother, and in 1871 she was also caring for Fanny CHAPMAN, a nurse child. This may have been the daughter of a brother because a birth registration for Fanny gives the infant’s mother’s maiden name as WATKINSON.

John and Sarah Harper’s seventh child, Rebecca (perhaps named after her grandmother), married John MOORE, a fisherman who later worked as a brickmaker’s labourer.

They had eleven children, of whom nine reached adulthood. John and Rebecca are remembered on a handsome stone in St Oswald’s churchyard. It stands quite close to the grave of Rebecca’s Uncle Robert Stork. Her father, “Right John”, has a Filey burial record but no known grave.

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A Companion for Today’s Robin

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I snapped this chaffinch in Crescent Gardens this morning and didn’t notice its warty feet until I processed the photo. It seems finches of several species are prone to Fringilla papillomavirus (FPV). The condition is also called papillomatosis or, colloquially, fur foot or bumblefoot. The “warts” don’t seem to affect the general health of the birds but may accumulate to such a degree that perching becomes problematic – and feet are sometimes lost.

Brother John

Robert STORK, son of Luke and husband of Margaret CHAPMAN and Rachel HUMPHREY, (and Filey’s Bellman for 28 years), had a younger brother, John.

John appears on the FamilySearch Tree as Robert’s brother and married to Anna STEEL. In Kath’s database, Filey Genealogy & Connections, brother John has two wives, Sarah HARPER and Ann CHAPMAN.

(There is another pedigree in FamilySearch Genealogies supplied by James Mutzelburg that favours John marrying “Hannah”.)

In the Bridlington Parish Church marriage register, the father of Hannah Steel is given as William, a miller. John’s father is Henry, a labourer. If this record is accepted at face value, this John is not Robert the Bellman’s brother.

1843_STORKjn&STEELhannah_mar

Eight years after the wedding, in High Street Bridlington, William Steel is living with his daughter and son in law, and two of their children – George and Jane Ann. William gives his birthplace as Eastrington. I think he is the William christened at Laxton, near Goole, in January 1794, the son of Robert and Elizabeth. A Burton Agnes marriage in 1817 to Elizabeth MASSENDER is possibly the union of this John’s parents.

The other John married Sarah HARPER in 1849 and two years later she gives her birthplace as Haisthorpe, near Burton Agnes. Sarah’s parents were possibly Robert and Rebecca.

To give you the two sets of children now would be confusing. I’ll just say that FST John may have had more children than he is given and some of those listed appear to have wayward birth years. Kath hasn’t given Luke Stork’s son John all his children either. I found two more.

The two Johns had one thing in common. They were both familiar with the inside of the same magistrate’s court.

FST John first…

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In 1871, John and Hannah gave their address as “The Hall, Haisthorpe”. Thirteen miles away, John is enumerated in King Street with five of his children and a nurse child, Frances CHAPMAN. His second wife, Ann Chapman, (not the mother of Frances), was away on census night. The household also contained a lodger, John McGURK, an Irish bootmaker.

And just down the street lived brother Robert and second wife Rachel Humphrey.

Delville Wood

I haven’t been able to establish exactly when and where Tom CHAPMAN sustained the wounds from which he died, on this day 1916. He was serving in the 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment and the following extract from a snowdenhouse article places him at Longueval four days earlier.

On the 23rd a joint operation by the 3rd and 5th Divisions was put into action. Both Divisions attacked from the west of Longueval with the 3rd Division on the right and the 5th Division on the left. At 3:40 am the 1st Northumberland Fusiliers advanced followed by the 13th Kings and 12th West Yorks. They made good progress advancing through the northern part of Longueval and into Delville Wood itself, until they came up against heavy machine-gun fire from the front and left. They were forced to fall back at first to Piccadilly Street and then to Pont Street. Two other battalions captured a German strong point close to the Orchard in the north of the village but after being heavy counter attacked they were also forced to retire.

“Piccadilly Street” is the road north out of the village, so I think Tom may have fallen in the area circled on the Google Earth satellite image below.

DelvilleWood_GE

He was taken to a nearby casualty receiving station and then, perhaps, moved to a hospital where he died.

The Battle for Delville Wood was a bitterly fought affair and South African units particularly suffered enormous casualties. Graham Leslie McCallum writes about his grandfather’s experiences on the Western Front here. Scroll down until you see photographs of Longueval and Delville, which may change the pictures you have in your mind of a French village and wood in summer.

Tom was buried in La Neuville British Cemetery, Corbie, which is about 30 km west of Longueval. He is remembered on a family grave in St Oswald’s; he has the left-hand kerb and older brother Frank the right.

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Memories of FRANK CHAPMAN, died 28 Dec 1926, aged 38.

And TOM CHAPMAN, died of wounds in France, 27 July 1916, aged 20.

Tom is on the FamilySearch Tree.

‘He Opened Africa’s Skyways’

This is the inscription on the headstone of John WILLIAMSON in Cape Town’s Maitland Cemetery. Born Filey in 1895 he must have spent quite a few years in South Africa. Skyways can’t be opened in a hurry, surely.

John was one of the unlucky generation, called upon to fight for the elites in the worst of wars. I haven’t been able to confirm it yet, but I think he served as a motor mechanic in the infant Royal Air Force between 1915 and 1918. There is circumstantial evidence that he migrated to South Africa shortly after the end of the First World War and was serving in the South Africa Air Force when the Second began. His brief service details on the CWGC website reveal that he was known as “John Billie”. Plain “John” when his birth was registered, his father was a John William, a more likely reason for the diminutive, perhaps, than the surname.

I haven’t found a marriage for John in the UK but an online search found a possible daughter in law in the Capetown suburb where he lived with his wife ‘C. M.’ Cato ‘Dinky’ Williamson née LADAN, was the sister of sculptor Eduard Louis LADAN (1918? – 1992). She was one of South Africa’s first female pilots. Eduard served in the SAAF in the Second World War and was rewarded for distinguished services in the King’s Birthday Honours in 1943.

John is remembered on the Filey War Memorial in Murray Street and on a family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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And their dear son, Lt. JOHN WILLIAMSON S.A.A.F., died July 22nd 1942 aged 46, buried at Capetown, S.A.

‘Loved, honoured and remembered.’

The family is represented on the FamilySearch Tree but the pedigree is limited to just five generations of his direct male line.

Today’s Image

The mysterious algal bloom is back on the boating lake. Last evening it covered about three-quarters of the lake surface, a mosaic of slimy green ‘floes’. The wind overnight had pushed these to the eastern end, up against the retaining wall.

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When I photographed today’s star duckling I didn’t notice the lump on its back. I guess compromised nature will have to take its course.

A Shaggy Dog Story

CHAPMAN, M (Shaggy) 1891A 1909 newspaper account of the sinking of Lina, (Tuesday’s post), informed readers that the skipper, Mortimer CHAPMAN, was “a few years ago, a famous footballer”. Here he is about 1891 when he played for Filey Red Stars. Several Filey amateurs did go on to professional Football League clubs and perhaps Mortimer was one of them.

His granddaughter, Jane GARTON, spoke about him when interviewed for the Heritage Lottery funded project Exploring Filey’s Past about twelve years ago.

My grandfather was a real Filey character. His nickname was ‘Old Shaggy’…He used to sit in the Memorial Gardens but he always had an old sou’ wester on and never took it off. He never took it off when he went to bed and he was buried in it. But he used to talk to people [and] they all used to talk to him…Old Shaggy, how he got his name, it was something to do with a dog and he used to say to this dog, “shake it shaggy” and then my granddad got the name Shaggy.

He was photographed on the Coble Landing in the late 1940s with eight other fishermen and a couple of children. Can you pick him out?

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Photographer unknown, courtesy Martin Douglas.

Morton, the sixth child of Thomas CHAPMAN and Mary JENKINSON, was baptized on the first of March 1815 but he died in January the following year. He was followed on the 29th  December 1816 by the first of five Mortimer CHAPMANs recorded in Filey Genealogy & Connections. The Chapman pedigree on FG&C doesn’t go back beyond Thomas and Mary so I don’t know if there were earlier Mortimers in the line. (The name seems to have Norman origins and is linked to a couple of places, one in France and the other in the Holy Land. Choose between its resulting meanings – ‘still water’ or dead sea’.)

Only Mortimer born 1844 is on FamilySearch Tree at the moment. He is Shaggy’s uncle. I’ll connect them on FST as soon as I can.

Bethalina

Bethalina CHAPMAN’s first husband, George COWLING, died 163 years ago today at the age of 26. While long-line fishing, he drowned “off Filey” – possibly somewhere in the watery expanse captured by Today’s Image.

Bethalina’s second husband, Thomas FREEMAN, died 142 years ago yesterday, aged 47. In 1861 he was working as a labourer but had turned to fishing ten years later.

Bethalina made it to age sixty. She had one child with George and three with Thomas – and at least 17 grandchildren.

I wrote a short post about girls’ names in Looking at Filey that featured Bethalina (aka Bothalina, Bothia, Bythia, Bithynia).  I also gave her a page on the LaF Wiki, which I’ll update soon.

Bethalina’s families are represented on both Filey Genealogy & Connections and Family Search Tree. I did some further research today, concentrating mainly on a second COWLING child that appears on FG&C. Thomas Marmaduke’s record shows he was born in 1856 and if that is correct then George could not have been his father.  Bethalina married Thomas FREEMAN in July 1857, so maybe he was the bio dad.

Thomas thoroughly confused the census enumerator in 1861 and the enumerators’ handwriting in that year and in 1871 has flummoxed the Find My Past transcribers.

Living with Thomas and “Bohahna” at 2, Wenlock Place in 1861 was “daughter in law” Mary CAWLING. There’s nothing much wrong with that, but his own boy and girl, William and Elizabeth, also bear the family name Cawling and relationship “in law”. In 1871 he has accepted Mary “COWLAND” as daughter and William as a Freeman. There are no signs of Thomas Marmaduke anywhere.

When I eventually caught up with the mystery child it was in Filey, marrying Mary Ann HOWE at St Oswald’s Church in 1903. (Mary Ann is “HOWL” in some transcribed sources.) He claimed, then, to be 45 years old and was therefore conceived after the marriage of Bethalina and Thomas Freeman.

1903_COWLINGthosmarmHOWE_MARRIAGE

However, if he was truthful at the 1911 Census the connection becomes questionable. He gave his birthplace as Staindrop in County Durham. That place is in Teesdale Registration District and there is a likely record for him there but in June Quarter 1857. The mother’s maiden surname is given as HOWDEN.

Thomas Marmaduke’s wife gave her birthplace as Princes End, Staffordshire. This was an area between Tipton and Coseley in the Dudley Registration District. A convincing record gives her birth there in the June Quarter of 1878, mother’s maiden surname COLE. (The age difference between the couple is  16 years in the marriage register and 1911 Census return, and 15 years in the GRO Births Index.)

Mary Ann was about six months pregnant when she walked down the aisle. Thomas Marmaduke junior’s birth was registered in the quarter following the wedding. Curiously, FG&C gives the birthplace as Frankton near Rugby but the registration was made in Scarborough. The birthplace may be correct because in 1911 the family was living in Foleshill, Warwickshire, about ten miles away from Frankton.