Christ and Christiana

I looked deeper into the Yorkshire Sigsworths this morning and happened upon Christiana, daughter of yet another John, and Hannah – or was it Elizabeth?

The Market Weighton church register has this baptism record –

1837_SIGSWORTHchristiana_BAP

Every other source I found, beginning with the 1841 census, asserts that Elizabeth is Christiana’s mother.

Market Weighton was Elizabeth’s home village but the couple was living some distance away at the time, in Wawne. In every census in which Christiana is recorded her birthplace is given as Market Weighton, except the last, 1911, when Wawne appears. “Hannah” may simply be a clerical error.

John Sigsworth followed a lowly occupation – licensed hawker – and Christiana worked as a domestic servant before she married Thomas MARSHALL, a bricklayer, in 1867. They had three children. Their firstborn was registered as John Sigsworth MARSHALL and this is serendipitous for a couple of reasons. FamilySearch Tree has, for now at least, a pedigree in which Christiana’s husband is married to another woman!

If John’s middle name doesn’t convince that Miss Waudby is an impostor, the 1871 census seals the deal. John Sigsworth Marshall, aged 2, is enumerated twice. He is with his parents and sister in Walter’s Terrace, and with his grandparents, John and Elizabeth Sigsworth, not far away in Witham. (Both addresses are in the Sculcoates Registration District.) Elizabeth gives her birthplace as Market Weighton. For Christiana, the enumerator just put “Market”.

I was raised a short distance from Witham, a dusty, aromatic area by the River Hull. Fairly quiet in the 1950s and 60s but I imagine it was crowded, noisy – and even more smelly – in Victorian times. Growing up in a Sculcoates Terrace may not have been easy. In 1901, 67-year-old Thomas Marshall was caretaker at a board school and John Sigsworth, 32, single and still living with his parents, was a general labourer. In 1911, Thomas described himself as a retired bricklayer and John, who still hadn’t found a wife, worked on the docks.

I don’t know what sort of life Christiana Waudby had. The after-marriage census sources attached to her tree belong, by rights, to her Sigsworth namesake. She doesn’t have any grandparents.

The other Christiana lived her threescore and twenty years amongst the poor of England’s third-largest port, probably oblivious to her stupendous heritage. FamilySearch connects her to a “super pedigree”, rightly or wrongly, making her a direct descendant of that Usual Suspect, Charlemagne, and a bewildering array of other nobility – kings of what would become France, Germany and Hungary, with a few Plantagenets thrown in, plus Franks, Merovingians and Picts. En route to the King of Kings.

If you start a journey with Christ and go back in time I suspect you will end up with the First Couple. That would be no surprise, but on the way, you will bump into King Serug, aka Sargon of Akkad, who has been reincarnated in this social media age. ROFL.

Good luck travelling forward in time. You may wander for hours before you find Christiana Sigsworth. It might be easier going from Christiana to Christ.

The Belgian Vice-Consul for Goole

A shipowner, a shipping agent, a father of five, a widower (twice), and an Englishman born in Wakefield, he rests next to George STERICKER in St Oswald’s churchyard.

D26_IBBOTSONjoseph_20170503_fst

His stone is badly eroded and the Crimlisks did well to decipher what they did forty years ago. My digitization has this:

In affectionate remembrance of JOSEPH IBBOTSON of Goole, who departed this life (19 June 1885?), aged [blank] years.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society has the advantage of having the burial record and offers the correct year of Joseph’s death and his age – 1865 and 65.

I wonder what he was doing in Filey. And how much did the Belgians pay him?

I haven’t been able to discover the names of the ships he owned but, as an agent in the 1830s, he was advertising the transport of goods and people from Selby to Yarmouth, calling in at Goole and Hull – on the “first-class steamer” Ormrod and the steam schooner Albatross.

Albatross_image

The Ormrod is an exceedingly strong built Vessel, Copper-fastened, nearly new, and will be found a most efficient Vessel for the Trade.

The Packet [Albatross] is neatly fitted up with Berths and every accommodation for Passengers that can conduce to their comfort.

Separate Cabin for Ladies, with respectable Female Attendants.

The fare for the Chief Cabin was 18 shillings, which is about £80 in today’s unreal money.

Joseph was survived by two of his five children, Joseph Henry and Hannah Ellen. Barbara, born to first wife Sarah, was the only one who married but she had died three years earlier, just a few months after plighting her troth to John Shepley ASH.

A couple of days after Joseph’s death, newspapers carried notices that Joseph Henry had taken over the business of Shipping and Forwarding Agent at Custom House Quay in Goole. A couple of weeks later the Belgians appointed him Consular Agent for the Port. John Henry didn’t have time to make his fortune. He died aged 27 in 1869. He seems to have been the end of this Ibbotson line and isn’t blood-connected to many forebears either on FamilySearch Tree.

 In staggering contrast, his father’s first wife, Sarah PITCHFORTH, is super-rich in ancestors, connecting to the fantasy world of European Royalty, going beyond Charlemagne to Emperors of Rome. I haven’t travelled all her byways. Perhaps there are some Plantagenets hidden in there somewhere. I was amused, though, to bump into Baldric of Yorkshire, born 1015 and married to Elica Von Schweinfurt.

I’m not responsible for any of this.