Men in Drink

Gathering notes and sources together for Wiki Tree  “profile people” is time-consuming. Writing their biographies likewise.

Charles Waters SCRIVENER, surgeon, was visited with a variety of misfortunes in the late sixties and early seventies of the 19th century. His second child died not long after her birth in 1868, he declared himself bankrupt the following year and in April 1871 his wife Jane died. Six months before that, in the process of getting a valuation on a watch from Nathaniel (aka William) COOPER, he was assaulted in the Refreshment Room at Filey Station by a drunken carriage proprietor. John RICHARDSON believed the surgeon had a monetary debt to repay.

The debt in today’s money is about £290 and John’s fine plus costs a little over a third of that. I’m sure I have seen John in court before but his pedigree contains some solid citizens in Filey Genealogy & Connections. His representation on FamilySearch is minimal. He married twice but neither spouse is recorded on the Shared Tree.

Watchmaker Cooper has three footholds the Shared Tree, twice as Nathaniel, once as William – the pages generated by his own christening and those of his two daughters.

 Charles’ friend, William THORALD, may be the Reverend William THOROLD who is buried in Manor Road Cemetery, Scarborough. He has a brief biography on the Yorkshire Chess History website and it is interesting to note that “William was accused by his congregation in Weeton of being a drunkard, and was removed from active pastoral care”.

I hope to put Charles on Wiki Tree tomorrow.

Townscape 66 · Scarborough Spa

Sweet

The first monumental inscription in the East Yorkshire Family History Society Survey of 2014/15 remembers Jane Margaret SWEET of Newcastle upon Tyne, who married Filey doctor Charles Waters SCRIVENER. I created a profile for her on Wiki Tree this afternoon. I need to add her mother, siblings, husband Charles and her children but you can check out the start I have made here.

Flight of Fancy 27 · Frost Bonbons

footway, railway crossing, 54.204430, -0.291068

The Bankrupt Brothers

Elizabeth Christiana VICKERMAN married Bridlington sailmaker Thomas SCRIVENER in 1809 and in the next fifteen years gave birth to at least six children. I do not know when she died but Thomas married again in January 1831 when he was 44 and Anna CALAUM 35. Henry Thomas was born at the end of November 1831 and Charles Waters in April 1834.

On Monday I mentioned the unusual bond the brothers had. I said that when William Charles Scrivener was born “maternal grandmother Elizabeth Sweet was also his aunt”. This is a true statement but it does not tell the whole story. William’s birth was registered in the June Quarter of 1867, eleven years after the widow SWEET married his uncle Henry Thomas. His father, Charles, married Elizabeth’s firstborn daughter in St Oswald’s, Filey on the 15th of May that year, when she was either near term or already a mother. Impossible to say when Elizabeth attained her grandmother to William status. She died before the year was out.

Why would a 24 year-old fellow marry a widow twenty years his senior and a mother of seven children, five still living? For love or money?

Some sources claim that Elizabeth’s first husband, William Sweet, was a solicitor but I think he was only a solicitor’s clerk. She may not have been a rich widow. In 1851, aged 20, Henry was working as a draper, but enumerated at an establishment in St Pancras that housed 55 boys and men between the ages of 13 and 47 (median age 25) – an assortment of carpet salesmen, cashiers, clerks – and drapers. I do not know what accidents or designs took him from the capital to the far north of England but in 1861, five years after marrying, he was head of a household in the parish of St Andrew, Newcastle upon Tyne, a “Mustard Manufacturer employing 2 Men”. (Elizabeth’s father in law, Samuel Sweet, had been a Mustard manufacturer.) Three of Elizabeth’s children were at home, including Jane Elizabeth, Henry’s his sister-in-law to be but described by the enumerator as his “daughter-in-law”.

The following year Henry declared himself bankrupt and, for reasons I cannot fathom, was still a bankrupt six years later.

Younger brother Charles Waters Scrivener set out on a more elevated career path. Aged 17 in 1851, he was a Student of Medicine in Hull. I have not been able to find him in the 1861 census but in 1871 he was living in Clarence Terrace, Filey (now West Avenue), an “MD Doctor”. With him were Jane, their second son Thomas, Jane’s sister Mary Elizabeth Sweet and a servant, Elizabeth FOSTER, 19. As mentioned on Monday, first son William Charles was with his grandfather on census night and it would appear that Mary was in Filey to help Jane in a time of trial. Four weeks after the census Mrs Scrivener was dead. She had given birth to three children in three years and had suffered the ignominy (maybe) of her husband’s bankruptcy.

Eighteen months after his wife’s death, Charles married again. His bride was Mary Ann WOODALL. Alas, it does not appear that her father was William Edward, Registrar of the Court.

By 1881, Charles seems to have re-established himself as one of Filey’s doctors. (In 1873 he was also Acting Assistant Surgeon of the 2nd East Riding of Yorkshire Artillery Volunteer Force.) The family of three had moved to 3 Rutland Street and with them was “June CALAM”, a single woman aged 62 described as Charles’ “sister-in-law”. I think this was Jane Ann CALAUM, daughter of Michael and Anna née BRAMBLES. Sources indicate that Charles’ mother, Anna CALAUM, was born eighteen years before Michael and Anna married. As I do not have Michael’s birth record yet, it is possible Jane and Anna were half-sisters.

Henry was a widower for just over five years. He married Jane WINN in Hartlepool in 1873 but I have not found a parish record that might have given his occupation. He had recovered remarkably from bankruptcy because in 1871 he claimed to be – a surgeon. He also told the enumerator he was 35 and had been born in Scarborough. On census night he was visiting widow Dora MORISON, 47, and her four children in Castle Eden, County Durham. Eldest son James, 17, was a Medical Student at Edinburgh University.

Henry died a Gentleman in 1879.

I have not been able to discover what he was doing at the Globe Hotel.

Brother Charles followed him to eternity about three years later and is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard, but nowhere near his first wife.

Dog 29 · Gizmo

The little fella migrated inland some time back. I hope he is keeping well.