A Mysterious Child

Sophia WALLIS was baptised at St Oswald’s on this day in 1850 and buried in the churchyard less than a week later. The burial register offers “Inft” in the age column but I can’t find her birth registration in this country. She may have been born in Germany weeks or months earlier  – and baptised in Filey as her time for departure drew near.

Whatever forces brought this family to Filey, they didn’t keep the survivors here. I wonder how the parents fared.

Mary Ann was the fifth and last child of fisherman and lodging housekeeper Matthew CRAWFORD and Sarah JAMESON (FG&C). She married John Robert STORRY at Filey St Oswald’s on 3 December 1904 and they set up home in Scarborough. Henry was born in the summer of 1906 and may have been their only child. John, a labourer at marriage, was described as a “retired coal dealer” in 1932 when Mary Ann died. She left him effects valued at a little over a hundred pounds.

John was still living at 72 Commercial Street when The Register was taken in September 1939, working as a grocer and general dealer. He died at the Fair View Hotel in Scarborough in the first week of January 1951. His son Henry may have been the hotel’s proprietor because at probate John’s address was given as 2 St John’s Avenue. Henry and his wife Jane Ann are named in the Probate record; John’s effects were valued at £6,199 3s. 1d.

There are earlier two posts looking at Christopher and Elizabeth – End of a Line? and Coltas Continued.

Edward didn’t use all his given names all of the time and is remembered as just Edward on the family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard. I have put him on the Shared Tree and connected him to Georgina, who was already there, waiting. There is a little more work to do on the family

It is Fanny the Second who was buried this day. She lived about sixteen months longer than her older namesake.

Townscape 80 · Filey

Coltas Continued

20190618ChristopherC

Both sons born to Christopher COLTAS and Elizabeth ATKINSON married. Christopher would surely have attended the wedding of Edwin to Bridget CLARK but he died before Herbert married Mary WRIDE. It seems that both happy couples remained childless.

Christopher’s second wife, Mary HILL, must have been ten or more years younger than he was. Their first two children died before their first birthdays. Two more boys followed and were given the same names as their predecessors. The younger, Alfred Hill COLTAS, left Scarborough while still in his teens. The 1871 census finds him boarding in Janet Street, Manchester, working as a glass blower. In 1875, aged 23, he married Elizabeth SMITH, daughter of a Warehouseman. Ten years after Christopher’s death they brought Christopher’s first grandchild into the world. Thirteen years after Clara Hill’s birth they named their fifth child Christopher.

Alfred’s older brother, Frederick Hill Coltas, lived with half-brother Edwin and Bridget in Scarborough and may have helped to work their deceased father’s farm for a while.  But he too crossed the Pennines into Lancashire and, at the age of thirty, married Ellen DOLAN in Salford. The 1881 census gives his occupation as “Bricksetter”. He was still a bricksetter in 1901, and by then a father of sixteen children, though only eight were living. Ellen had three more children after the 1901 census, all girls – and only one of them was recorded in the 1911 census. Ellen filled out the form as a widow and stated she had borne 19 children in 30 years of marriage, and ten had died.

Two of Alfred and Elizabeth’s five children had died before 1911 so, in total, Christopher Coltas the Eldest had 24 grandchildren he didn’t live to see, and twelve reached adulthood. A quick search reveals five marriages but I have no intention of looking for Christopher’s great-grandchildren. I’m content that my gloom of a few days ago – that his two sons with Elizabeth Atkinson may have been the last of his line – has lifted now. I hope some living descendants of Christopher COLTAS and Mary HILL will find the extended pedigree on FamilySearch and add to it.