The Impossible Wife

It was only a few days ago, but I have already forgotten what steps led me to Mary Jane JENKINSON. My genealogy workflow has always been rather chaotic and I have been attempting to instil some discipline into it. To keep track of Filey people, I now have a couple of Excel spreadsheets and several lists (in Word) to monitor chronology (important dates), locations and other things that seem important. There is rather more duplication of data input than I’d like but, hey, I have nothing better to do.

Anyway, I found Mary Jane on FamilySearch Tree married to the wrong man. My constant and mostly reliable guide, Filey Genealogy & Connections, waved the warning flag.

FamilySearch, as I write, has given Martin GULLEN three wives.

20190524GULLENmartinWives_FST

You will notice that Jane and Mary Jane share the same family name and dates of birth and death. They also share a couple of children.

20190524GULLENmartin&jane_FST

20190524GULLENmartin&maryjane_FST

Jane is without parents on both FST and FG&C. She was baptised on 6 April 1867 at the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Filey by her mother, Jane Jenkinson née COATES. The name of the child’s father is not known – she arrived a couple of years after her mother’s first husband drowned. Jane the Younger, had five Jenkinson half-brothers and sisters but they all acquired a stepfather when Jane the Elder married John PRESTON in 1870.

Jane, the first wife of Martin Gullen, died on the 5 August 1914 in Gristhorpe (Filey Parish) and is remembered on Martin’s headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

20190524GULLENjane

JANE, the beloved wife of MARTIN GULLEN of Gristhorpe, died Aug 5th1914, aged 47.

‘Farewell dear husband be content

For unto you I was but lent;

Weep not for me nor sorrow make

But love my children for my sake.’

There were five children. The youngest, Edith Mary, was seventeen when her mother died. Edith’s “other mother” on FST died childless on 7 September 1940. The only child of Matthew “Walsher” Jenkinson and Elizabeth née BAXTER. Mary Jane married John Richard HAXBY in Yarmouth in 1912, at the age of 46.

20190524HAXBYmaryjane

I messaged Isobel via FST to suggest the “impossibility” of Mary Jane and have been given permission to make the necessary changes to the pedigree. Isobel is Martin’s great-granddaughter so I feel under some pressure to get things right first time.

I will unlink Mary Jane, marry her to John Richard and also wed Lily Shepherd née ALDEN to her first husband.

A stone has fallen next to Martin’s grave. It remembers Tom Gullen and his two wives, Alice and Emma Louise. Neither woman has forebears on FST. More work!

Labour

20190524CorbynLabourI didn’t pay much attention to the Labour Party’s invitation to vote for its candidates in the EU Elections. Yesterday I caught wind of a stench emanating for this organization. One of their cats, from years ago, had escaped from the bag. Flea-bitten, covered in sores. Stinking. This morning I watched Dionne “go off on one”. A former policewoman, she had picked up on what Carl Benjamin has just revealed. She is very angry. In seven terrible minutes, she might make you angry too – and vow never to vote for Labour again. Not just because of Corbyn’s Brexit betrayal. There is no chance whatsoever of Labour bringing this benighted, laughing-stock nation together. (If the links don’t work you will know the filthy story is true and hopefully will find other ways of getting out into the wild.)

Two Brothers, Valued

At the  1861 Census, William JENKINSON was living at Hope Cottages, Filey, with his wife Frances and infant daughter Mary Elizabeth. His younger brother, Matthew, was in Mosey’s Yard with Jane née COATES and two children, William and Mary.

William was master of the yawl Hope, and in a gale on November 2nd that year he was lost.

1861_JENKINSONwm_WidowPayment

At the beginning of December two years later, Matthew was drowned from his coble in Filey Bay.  The Yorkshire Gazette of 5th December carried a vivid account of the tragedy.

Two Lives Saved by “The Hollon” Life-Boat

This life-boat only arrived at Filey last week, and was the gift of the Lord Mayor of York, by whom it was formally presented to the town of Filey on Thursday last. On Tuesday several cobles went off in the morning for the purpose of fishing. The wind was rising at the time, and about noon blew a gale from S.S.E., with a heavy sea running into the bay. Seeing that the cobles would return shortly from the fishing ground, the new life-boat was speedily got out, manned and launched, in readiness to render assistance. The arrival of the boats was watched with great excitement. One boat upset near the shore, and the crew, consisting of three men, were thrown into the sea. The poor fellows had to struggle for life, and eventually the despairing cries of those on shore were changed to joy as they saw the last of the three men washed upon the beach, the lives of all having been saved. Shortly afterwards, another coble came in sight, the storm, in the meantime, having increased. When some distance from the shore, a huge breaker lifted the frail boat as if it were a toy, upsetting it and throwing the crew into deep water. The life-boat sped to their assistance, and after great exertions, succeeded in rescuing two of the men from a watery grave.; but the third, named Matthew Jenkinson, was never seen after the boat upset. He has left a wife and four children.

1863_JENKINSONmatt_WidowPayment

Two months after Matthew’s death, widow Jane took their fifth child to St Oswald’s to be baptized.

The Shipwrecked Mariner’s Society is now 178 years old and still “making a difference”.

One would expect Jane to receive more support from the Society but how much did the widows receive in today’s money? £6 5s. doesn’t seem a lot, does it?

There are several online calculators and those offering a single, and simple, answer usually satisfy curiosity. In this instance, Frances received £535 at 2016 prices. What’s that, roughly – two or three weeks’ wages?

The £535 figure is a calculation of the changing “real price” of a “commodity” valued at £6 5s over time, arrived at by multiplying the original sum by the annual percentage increase in “RPI”.

There are other ways to make the calculation, though, and they give wildly different figures.

Historic opportunity cost: £631

Assessing the labour value/labour earnings/labour cost of our commodity: £4,162

Income value/economic status: £5,606

Economic cost: £14,950

These terms are helpfully defined at Measuring Worth. For the two bereft Jenkinson families, I think “labour earnings” might be the most appropriate. So imagine Frances receiving about £4,000 and Jane £7,700. That would have helped a lot, perhaps, but both widows married again – Jane in 1870 to John PRESTON and Frances in 1872 to Thomas SEXTON.

William and Matthew’s parents have, like the CREASERs yesterday, loads of IDs to sort out on FamilySearch Tree. I have made a start but suggest you go to Filey Genealogy & Connections if you are interested in following the family fortunes in pedigree form.