Tree-to-Tree

Find My Past has begun the roll-out of their Tree-to-Tree hints system. I worked on a couple of Filey families today and the information I added brought invitations to assess details other growers have discovered. I still have nightmares about the way My Heritage made it so easy for strangers to butcher your loved ones. Unless you are a vengeful type, there was no upside that I could see.

Before she married in 1888, Mary Ann LANE gave birth to Francis William. In 1901 he was enumerated at the home of his widowed aunt Elizabeth in Alma Square, Filey. He worked as an errand boy and, whatever it was he fetched and delivered, I imagined him whistling cheerfully as he went around the town, oblivious that he was earmarked for cannon fodder.

Filey Genealogy & Connections has very little to say about Francis but, as he isn’t “remembered” in the churchyard, I was prepared to let him go. After the rain stopped this morning, I went to photograph the grave of his mother and stepfather.

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The large flower is for Mary Ann and Robert Jenkinson’s grandson, also Robert Jenkinson, and has been placed there, I would guess, by Olive.

In loving memory of their grandson, Robert Jenkinson COLLING, dear husband of Olive, died March 8th1993, aged 68.

Francis William is uncle to the younger Robert and thanks to Tree-to-Tree I was able to trace his life journey, effortlessly.

He survived the Great War, as a soldier marrying Sarah Ellen HOYLAND in 1917. Sarah was from a mining family and Francis chose to live in her hometown, Pontefract. He worked as a house painter, took an interest in politics and in 1933, as a Socialist, was elected unopposed to the Town Council. He died in 1965, aged 78.

I put Francis William on FST this afternoon but there much more work to be done.

 

Yawl ‘Dorothy’

Captain Syd has Dorothy in his database, registered as SH 142, and built in Scarborough by T. W. Walker in 1883. She was 63’7 long, lute stern, weighed 44 tons and worked out of Hull initially (H1348) before being brought “home” in 1891.  Her first Scarborough owner was fisherman William MENNELL. The vessel passed through several sets of co-owners and numerous skippers, though only five of the latter are listed. She was broken up in April 1905.

In late April 1902, she brought melancholy news to Scarborough that one of the six crew, John COLLING, had died in his sleep as Dorothy sailed from the Dogger to Grimsby with her catch.

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John was 28 years old and his widow, Elizabeth Ann née WILLIS, a year younger. Betsy Jenkinson Colling was born twelve or so hours after her father died. As she grew older she would surely have been told about Thomas Cammish Willis COLLING, a younger brother who had lived for just 5 months in 1900.

Elizabeth Ann did not marry again and died in 1961 aged 86.

Betsy married Thomas Robert CRIMLISK, known as “Tommy A” (to distinguish him from Tommies B and C), and lived to the equally grand age of 85.

I put John on FST a few weeks ago and added Elizabeth Ann and the children today. John was one of 13 children and, although two siblings died as infants, two others easily passed their biblical span, four reached their eighties and three celebrated their 90th birthdays.

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In loving memory of JOHN COLLING, the beloved husband of ELIZABETH A. COLLING, who died at sea on the yawl ‘Dorothy’, April 26 1902, aged 28 years.

‘They sleep in Jesus free from pain

Our loss though great to them is gain

Beloved by all who knew them here

And to their kindred none more dear

Yet hope through Jesu’s death is given

That soon we meet with them in Heaven.’

THOMAS C. W. COLLING their beloved child who died Dec 20 1901 aged 5 months.

Also the above named ELIZABETH ANN who died Jany. 20 1961 aged 86 years.

‘In Heavenly love abiding’

An Accident Revisited

John William Sumpton SAYER’s death was briefly reported in newspapers around the country under headings such as “Man Killed on Beach” and “Run Over by a Fishing Boat”. In not many more than fifty words it was explained that fishing boats in Filey were, in 1939, pulled down to the sea “on two wheels”. John had taken a boat to the sea’s edge when two men following with another coble shouted for him to get out of the way. “Sayers appeared to stumble and before the men could stop, one of the wheels went over his head.” He was killed instantly.

Trivial accounts like this are so unfair – in seeming to imply that the person who died brought on their own demise. John was 62-years-old, a husband and father of two girls, then in their thirties. He deserved better.

He is not, as yet, on the FamilySearch Tree but he has one of the more extensive pedigrees on Filey Genealogy & Connections.Kath Wilkie has attached a note to his record that gives the sad event some context – and the stricken man a measure of dignity that the newspapers denied him.

Severe weather conditions: raining cats & dogs – dark @ 6.30am on Weds. 18 Jan 1939. Had been helping to launch cobles, but had left his oilskins under a fishbox on Coble Landing.  Went off to get them after 3 cobles had been launched so that he wasn’t drenched to the skin. Put his oilskins on and bent his head against the wind and rain.  He couldn’t see because it was so dark, but he knew the way anyway – he’d done it often enough.  He didn’t hear them bringing the ‘JOAN MARY’ down, because of the wind, rain and the sea – and the others couldn’t see him either.   He was knocked down – but nobody saw – and the wheel ran over his head and he was dragged up to 20 yards before they realised what had happened. One of them ran to get Dr Vincent, but he was dead.  The verdict was ‘accidental death’, but the coroner recommended that they use a light when launching the cobles in the dark to avoid any such further accidents.  The inquest was held at the Police Station on Thursday evening.  He had a traditional Filey Fisherman’s funeral with a short service at home (85 Queen Street) and then on to Ebenezer Chapel. He was buried in St Oswald’s.   The two men who were launching the Joan Mary were Thomas & Robert Cammish, both of Queen St (49 & 70) – plus others.

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The tall house is No.85 Queen Street, photographed this afternoon. John’s grave has a kerb rather than a headstone and the inscriptions on such are often obscured by vegetation.

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In Loving Memory of my dear husband JOHN W.S. SAYERS

accidentally killed 18th Jan 1939 aged 62

Also of his dear wife ELIZABETH ANN died 27th Nov 1964 aged 87

‘Reunited            In God’s keeping’

John was a grandfather of William Johnson COLLING, one of the “Langleecrag Cousins” (see 15th November’s post). His somewhat unusual middle-name “Sumpton” had come to him from at least as far back as the late 17th century. His fourth great-grandfather, Henry SUMPTON, was born around 1685.

This post was written before I checked out Looking at Filey. I wrote about this accident on 18 January 2011.

I have created a page on the LaF Wiki for John and Elizabeth Ann’s Monumental Inscription record.

Suffer Little Children

I wrote about the accident that ended the life of Henry Herbert CAMBRIDGE on Looking at Filey. There is currently a security issue at the UK Web Archive so I’ll copy the 2012 post here rather than give the link to the Wayback Machine.

A Fatal Hesitation

Three days after celebrating his 37th birthday Jonathan Bulmer CAMBRIDGE saw a motor lorry knock down his son in Station Avenue. Herbert Henry, thighs broken and skull fractured, died about an hour later, at 11.45 am. He was two years and five months old.

The Scarborough Mercury of Friday 30th October 1914 carried the story: –

Manoeuvres of the troops at Filey on Monday [26th] were attended by a regrettable fatality, a child being run over by a motor lorry. A full report of the inquest will be found in another part of this paper. Men of the Hunts Cyclists Battalion were called out to proceed to Driffield. Many people in Filey thought they were leaving the town for good, but this was not so, they returned in the evening. Thinking, however, that they were leaving permanently a large number of people gathered, and the motor approached the quarters of the men at the same time. The child ran across the road and was returning when there was shouting, the child hesitated and was knocked down with fatal results. The boy was the only male child of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Cambridge. The incident was exceedingly distressing, but at the inquest no blame was attached to the driver, who seemed to feel the incident very much.

The driver was Lance Corporal Robert WALTON of Coanwood, Northumberland. After crossing the railway line, heading into town, he was slowing as he approached his destination, traveling at five or six miles an hour. He saw Herbert cross the road in front of him but the child’s  sudden doubling back took him by surprise. Even so, he expected Henry to regain the pavement before he passed by. The shouting of a person or persons in the crowd had, however, confused Henry and caused him to hesitate in the middle of the road. The lorry’s mudguard caught him a glancing blow to the head and he fell under the wheels.

 

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Station Avenue,  2012

 

It appears from witness statements at the inquest that Henry was with his mother at one side of Station Avenue but, seeing his father on the other side, dashed over to be with him. Approaching the opposite pavement, though, he could no longer spot his father’s face in the crowd and so turned back. Perhaps one or two people saw the lorry approaching, sensed the child was in danger and shouted a warning that triggered his fatal hesitation. Herbert Henry CAMBRIDGE may have been killed by kindness.

Blameless Lance Corporal WALTON may not have survived the war. A soldier of the same name and rank serving in the Northumberland Fusiliers was killed on 1st July 1916 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial. Herbert rests in St Oswald’s churchyard.  (Added note:  This Robert was almost certainly killed at La Boisselle on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.)

Herbert rests in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of HERBERT HENRY, the beloved son of JOHN & ELIZABETH CAMBRIDGE, died Oct 26th 1914 aged two years & 5 months.

Suffer little children to come unto me.

Also ALICE MAY, aged 3 weeks.

(The burial register gives Alice’s age as 14 days.)

Young Herbert has a fairly substantial pedigree on Filey Genealogy & Connections, going back as far as John CAMMISH born 1660. He has fewer forebears on the FamilySearch Tree but I’ve added some today.

 

 

Aunt Mima’s Wedding

Jemima SCOTTER (9XLP-RRP), the seventh child of Mark SCOTTER and Alice COLLING, was baptised at St Oswald’s on this day 1887.  The family is fairly well represented on FamilySearch Tree but there is some work to do there.

Mark was one of a number of Norfolk fishermen who moved north and put down roots on the Yorkshire coast. His life was ended by a German bullet in November 1917. A U boat had intercepted his yawl Susie and Kath, in a Filey Genealogy note, suggests its captain thought Mark was reaching for a gun and ordered him shot. Susie was scuttled but the remainder of its crew took to the small coble, were picked up by the Lord Kitchener and, with Mark’s body, brought safely home.

Jemima’s mother had died about 9 months earlier so when she married Herbert Salvidge HALL on 15th June 1918 she was given away, I think, by her brother in law Jenkinson HAXBY.  She looks rather solemn in her wedding photograph, as does her younger sister Maud standing at the other side of the groom.

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After the wedding Herbert and Jemima moved to the Middlesbrough area and their daughter Olive’s birth was registered there in the September Quarter of the following year.  Olive was just two years old when her father died. Martin, who donated the wedding photo to Looking at Filey, told me that his grandaunt Jemima returned to Filey after her husband’s death but he didn’t know what became of Olive. With all the extra resources I have access to now (compared to four or five years ago), I thought I would be able to trace the little girl but she remains elusive. Find My Past hints at three death registrations in the north of England for a middle aged unmarried Olive that don’t convince, even though the birth dates are acceptably close. There are several possible marriages and some 1939 Register entries that could be hers but, for now, her life journey must remain a mystery.

Filey Genealogy & Connections doesn’t have Jemima’s death.  If her birth registration in the September Quarter of 1887 was “late” she may be the Jemima HALL who lived to the ripe old age of 89. Born on the 14th June she was working as a Cook/Housekeeper at Drumranck Hall, Stokesley when the 1939 Register was taken (RG101/3298A/022/23 Letter Code: JHTJ).

A mystery of a different sort is pictured in Today’s Image. At the lowest tides the rocky “pier” jutting out from Filey Brigg is revealed.  Some think it a natural structure, others that the Romans built it. Or perhaps it is a medieval pier to facilitate the remove of building stone from the Brigg quarries. Divers have measured and mapped the boulders beneath the surface and perhaps a report will be published some time that will tell us, irrefutably, what the Spittals are all about.