‘Baltic’ and ‘Noran’

In a Filey Genealogy & Connections note, Kath says that George Whiteley BOYNTON acquired his by-name following his experience of fighting in the Crimean War. Little more than a boy, he was seemingly a combatant in a distant theatre of that conflict – the Baltic Sea. When the Anglo-French fleet attacked Kronstadt in 1854 he would have been just twelve years old, and a few weeks short of his 14th birthday at the war’s end. He gave his occupation as “Mariner” when he married Ann SAYERS in 1864.

Richard Duke ROBINSON, known locally as ‘Noran’ or ‘Dickie Noran’ (for a reason unknown to me), was 47 years younger than George. He made a useful prop for the older man when they were photographed on a quayside with five other fishermen.

BOYNTONbaltic&ROBINSONdickn_sp

This undated photo was kindly donated to the Looking at Filey blog by Suzanne Pollard and several names were usefully provided. If you reckon ‘Noran’ to be about 14, that would make ‘Baltic’ sixty-one years old, and the year 1903 or thereabouts.

At the 1911 census, George is still working at age 69, but as a general labourer, and living at 4 Spring Road, Filey, with Ann. The couple had six children, two of them failing to reach the first birthday. Three married and two of the boys would acquire distinctive by-names of their own – ‘Boysher’ and ‘Rammy’. More about them some other time.

I have a vague memory of hearing an amusing story about Dickie Noran. I’ll chase it up and, if recovered, share it here.

It appears that George acquired a lasting taste for violence in the eponymous northern sea. Married four years and with third child Annie’s appearance imminent…

1868_BOYNTONgeo_Assault_NEWS

In November 1877, the Scarborough Mercury reported: –

Fighting at Brid Station

At the Bridlington Petty Sessions on Saturday, before Lieut-Col Prickett and Mr C. Mortlock, George Boynton, of Filey, fisherman, was summoned for wilfully interfering with the comfort of the passengers at the Bridlington Railway Station on 13th ult. Inspector Craig of the North Eastern Railway appeared for the company. George Knaggs, porter, stated that defendant and a number of other fishermen were on the platform arguing about a boat, when defendant struck one of the others and a fight ensued. Defendant was turned out of the station but returned and renewed the disturbance. Fined £1 including costs.

George and Ann’s last child was born about three years later and if you think young Frank’s by-name, ‘Rammy’, has violent connotations, you’d be right. But it seems to have been confined to the football field.

George was eighty when he died in 1922 and Ann 86 when reunited with him four years later.

G347_BOYNTONgeorgew_20181019_fst

Find them on the Shared Tree. George’s mother, Elizabeth SUTTON, is not on FST yet. I’m struggling to determine which of several Boynton men called Francis she married.

The Murderer’s Brother

This post was intended to celebrate the birthday of John Appleby PRITCHARD, on this day 1827. Further research today revealed that this was actually the day he began his distinguished service with the Royal Navy, at the age of twelve.

If Filey Genealogy & Connections was misleading where the births of John and his father, John White Pritchard, are concerned, Kath provided an intriguing note about an explosive action in which the younger man took part. John junior was a senior officer on HMS Edinburgh at the Bombardment of Sveaborg, the most significant naval encounter of the Crimean War. It played out in this small patch of the Baltic Sea, just south of Helsinki.

1855_Sveaborg_GE

There is a detailed account of the clash between the Anglo-French Alliance and Russia here. It includes a useful plan of the disposition of the vessels involved that you can compare with the Google Earth image. I don’t know if the painter John Wilson CARMICHAEL witnessed the bombardment but his painting of it captures its incendiary nature with immediacy and power.

About seven years later, John Appleby died at sea while sailing home from Ceylon. He didn’t live to witness the shame his younger brother brought upon the family. You will find plenty of accounts of Edward William Pritchard’s crimes if you search for his name online – but maybe not the LaFredux post of 27 July 2017 – The Doctor’s Daughter.

The FamilySearch ‘system’ has put a lot of Pritchards on the World Tree but they are a mess of duplicates, waiting for a descendant or two to bring the generations together. A few erroneous dates notwithstanding, the family is more connected on FG&C.

John Appleby PRITCHARD  – on FG&Cand on FST.

A Naval Biographical Dictionary has entries for five of the seagoing family Pritchard. Start with John Appleby and then follow the forward arrows for the others.

Balaclava

William, the fourth child of Filey Draper and Postmaster William STORY, died at the age of 17 in the Crimea, a year or so after the infamous Charge of the Light Brigade. I have been unable to find any information about the part he played in what is sometimes referred to as “the first modern war”. Given his youth, I’m not surprised he is seemingly lost in the mists. I’m left imagining his path crossing one, or maybe both, of our Victorian wonder nurses, blessed Florence and irrepressible Mary. (Find their underwhelming pedigrees on FST here and here.)

Young William was one of about 25,000 British combatants who died in that conflict and as the preponderance succumbed to disease and neglect we can assume our Filey lad did too. Sevastopol fell in September 1855, the Russians retreated and several months of mopping up operations by the winning side ensued. The Treaty of Paris brought the war to an end on 30 March 1856.

D91_STORYwm_BalaclavaDet1_1m

I have put a photograph of the headstone on FST as a “Memory”,