Herring Coble ‘Unity’

The Driffield Times reported on 30 April 1892:-

After having enjoyed spring-like weather for a little while, an unwelcome change took place on Wednesday morning [27th], when it rained and blew incessantly. The weather and wind having changed toward evening, it being fine and pleasant, some of our fishing craft ventured to the fishing ground, and had already got a great many miles from land, when a sudden gale sprung up about four the next morning, a strong north wind blowing accompanied by heavy seas.

The small boats and a couple of larger herring cobles turned for home as soon as the weather “looked treacherous”. Two of the vessels needed the assistance of the lifeboat to get home safely. The skipper of Tally Ho! reported that they had been in the company of a third herring coble and great concern was shown for its crew. The boat was still missing on the morning of Friday (29th).

1892_UnityLost_NEWS

SH87 Unity was  ­40 feet long and weighed 20 tons. Although described above as a Scarborough boat, Captain Syd notes that Thomas COWLING of Filey shared ownership with  John REYNOLDS and Arthur Harrison SELLERS. The database gives the lost-with-all hands-date as 25th April but that may be my digitization error! The official Overseas Deaths and Burials record gives the 28th April and this date appears on the headstone of John and Richard’s parents.

Unity

Also of JOHN AND RICHARD, sons of the above, & EDMUND ROSS JENKINSON, son-in-law, who were lost at sea, April 28th 1892, aged 36, 34 and 30 years.

‘In the midst of life we are in death.’

You can easily navigate to the three men on Filey Genealogy & Connections, from John CAMMISH senior.

Bean, G 1891George BEAN was an incomer to Filey, born in one of the Hecks (Great or Little), near Selby. He is on FG&C but I suspect he has been given the wrong mother there.  You can see, though, that his father in law is ‘Unity Jack’ CRIMLISK, after whom the doomed herring coble was presumably named. The image of him (left) was taken in 1891 in his guise of Treasurer of Filey Red Stars Football Club.

SH140 Tally Ho!, mentioned in the Driffield Times report, was lost in Filey Bay on 8th December 1892.

Yawl ‘Dorothy’

Captain Syd has Dorothy in his database, registered as SH 142, and built in Scarborough by T. W. Walker in 1883. She was 63’7 long, lute stern, weighed 44 tons and worked out of Hull initially (H1348) before being brought “home” in 1891.  Her first Scarborough owner was fisherman William MENNELL. The vessel passed through several sets of co-owners and numerous skippers, though only five of the latter are listed. She was broken up in April 1905.

In late April 1902, she brought melancholy news to Scarborough that one of the six crew, John COLLING, had died in his sleep as Dorothy sailed from the Dogger to Grimsby with her catch.

1902_COLLINGjohnDeath_NEWS

John was 28 years old and his widow, Elizabeth Ann née WILLIS, a year younger. Betsy Jenkinson Colling was born twelve or so hours after her father died. As she grew older she would surely have been told about Thomas Cammish Willis COLLING, a younger brother who had lived for just 5 months in 1900.

Elizabeth Ann did not marry again and died in 1961 aged 86.

Betsy married Thomas Robert CRIMLISK, known as “Tommy A” (to distinguish him from Tommies B and C), and lived to the equally grand age of 85.

I put John on FST a few weeks ago and added Elizabeth Ann and the children today. John was one of 13 children and, although two siblings died as infants, two others easily passed their biblical span, four reached their eighties and three celebrated their 90th birthdays.

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In loving memory of JOHN COLLING, the beloved husband of ELIZABETH A. COLLING, who died at sea on the yawl ‘Dorothy’, April 26 1902, aged 28 years.

‘They sleep in Jesus free from pain

Our loss though great to them is gain

Beloved by all who knew them here

And to their kindred none more dear

Yet hope through Jesu’s death is given

That soon we meet with them in Heaven.’

THOMAS C. W. COLLING their beloved child who died Dec 20 1901 aged 5 months.

Also the above named ELIZABETH ANN who died Jany. 20 1961 aged 86 years.

‘In Heavenly love abiding’

FV ‘Emulator’

The steam drifter, wood built at Lowestoft in 1904, was bought by Matthew ‘Matty Airy’ CRIMLISK in 1914 when he saw the success ‘Billy Butter’ WATKINSON was having with a similar vessel, Lord Kitchener. Matthew shared ownership with William ‘Billy Trummy’ JENKINSON and the latter’s nephew, Richard Cammish JENKINSON. The war intervened and Emulator was requisitioned by the Admiralty and operated as a minesweeper. It is a terrible irony that she served without mishap until released by the government and then, on the first peace-time fishing trip from her home port, was blown up by a mine, about 25 miles east of Flamborough Head.

‘Matty Airy’ and his sons, Wilfred and Tom Robert CRIMLISK were killed. ‘Billy Trummy’ and his son, Thomas Castle ‘Toye’ JENKINSON also died, with Richard Cammish JENKINSON and Richard Baxter ‘Dick Fipney’ COWLING. Seven in all. A plaque in St Oswald’s Church names nine fishermen who died in 1919 but two were drowned from the coble Annie (yesterday’s post).

Seven Filey Men Lost

Drifter Sunk by Mine

There was great distress at Filey on Wednesday when it became known that the steam drifter Emulator, had been sunk through striking a mine 30 miles out of Scarborough, and that her crew of seven, all Filey men, had been lost. The Emulator left Scarborough on Tuesday afternoon for the fishing grounds, and the steam drifters Tryphena and Fear Not went out at the same time. The Tryphena returned on Wednesday morning and the Fear Not in the afternoon, and reported that shortly before ten o’clock on Tuesday night they heard a terrific explosion in the direction where they last saw the Emulator fishing. They missed the Emulator’s lights, and later, whilst cruising round, discovered traces of oil on the water, but there was no sign of any crew. A search was made at daylight by the Fear Not, but nothing could be seen, and after getting in their own lines the two drifters returned to port. The Emulator was taken over by the Government in 1916, and several members of the crew have been with her all the time. Latterly she has been fishing out of Grimsby, and only returned to Scarborough last Friday. She was owned by three of the men who, it is feared, have gone down with her, namely, Matthew Crimlisk, skipper aged about 40, married, of Filey (who had two sons with him); William Jenkinson, of Filey, mate (who had one son with him); and Richard Jenkinson. The other missing man is Richard Cowling, who married the daughter of a well-known Scarborough fisherman, and who leaves a widow and six or seven children.

Hull Daily Mail, 17 April 1919

There haven’t been enough hours today for me to find all the lost men and their families on FamilySearch Tree. Mainly because I have a studio portrait and headstone photograph, I’ll briefly introduce ‘Dick Fipney’ now.

wfsp_COWLINGrichdbax_portrait
photographer Walter Fisher, no date, courtesy Suzanne Pollard

Richard Baxter, son of William ‘Fipney’ COWLING and Margaret BAXTER, was born in 1871. Through common ancestors Robert JENKINSON and Margaret TRUCKLES, he was a third cousin to the other six aboard Emulator.

He married Alice BAYES in Scarborough in 1898  and the couple had seven children. Filey Genealogy & Connections shows that all but one married. The children of Richard and Alice haven’t been entered on the FamilySearch Tree yet.

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AB George Lewis

The headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard that remembers George LEWIS ( 1846 – 1918) and his wife Mary Jane née COWLING also asks us to think of…

…their beloved grandson, drowned in Falmouth Harbour while serving his King and Country, March 10 1918, aged 20 years.

D203_LEWISmaryjane_20171118_fst

Another seaman, Deckhand William CUTHBERTSON, drowned with young George but I have been unable to determine exactly how they died. The Lewis family headstone gives the wrong year for whatever accident befell them. The war was over; it was 1919.

One report says they were found floating in Falmouth Harbour, having fallen from their ship, HMT Emmanuel Camelaire, or perhaps from the dockside.

Emmanuel Camelaire
Photographer unknown, no date, Imperial War Museum

George was a “Trimmer Cook” – two clearly separate jobs. The first required him to get his hands dirty in the boiler room, and the second to keep them reasonably clean in the galley. I don’t know how long he had served in the Royal Naval Reserve but Lives of the First World War gives his birth date as 14 October 1896. His birth was registered in Scarborough, December Quarter 1898, so perhaps he was too young to join the service and lied about his age. He was fifteen when the war began.

He left a widow at their home in Grimsby, Christiana, four months pregnant with their first child. Annie LEWIS was born on the 9th of August and I photographed her stone in the churchyard this morning.

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The LEWIS family is a work in progress on FST.

 

SD ‘Research’

This was a fishing vessel that may have been just about worthy on a mill pond, but in heavy seas whipped by gale force winds, it put the crew of nine in the greatest danger, this day 1925. Had it pushed through the storm to Bridlington in deep water it might have survived but it grounded on Smithwick Sands and was overwhelmed by the waves. None of the crew survived and their bodies were never found.

Eight of the men were from Filey, five of them from one family. The ninth was James SOUTHERN, the boat’s engineer. Kath has a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections to the effect that James took the berth because he had six children and it was coming up to Christmas.

The tragedy is well described in Allen and Todd’s book, Filey – a Yorkshire Fishing Town, and you can read the extract at the Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre website.

A plaque on the wall of St Oswald’s Church remembers all Filey fishermen who “perished at sea & whose bodies were never found” between 1901 and 1848. A quarter of their number was lost from Research. The eight have memorials in the churchyard – on four headstones. Jane Baxter CRIMLISK née JENKINSON asks us to think of her father, husband, two brothers and a cousin. (A third brother, James Henry Newby JENKINSON drowned in another place at another time.)

F87_Research

In loving memory of JANE B. CRIMLISK, born 1885, died Sep 20th 1931. Also of her husband GEORGE J. CRIMLISK, born 1885, and her father and brothers JOHN R. JENKINSON, born 1862, ROBERT JENKINSON, born 1890, GEORGE F. B. JENKINSON born 1897, WILLIAM C. CAMMISH, born 1895. All drowned in the RESEARCH disaster.

The brothers Edwin Chapman and George JENKINSON, cousins to ‘Jack Sled’, are on a stone by the church, and Joseph Edward COLLEY with his parents and a sister, Amelia. William Cappleman CAMMISH has a second mention on another family stone.

I couldn’t find Ted and George on the FamilySearch Tree but the other lost Jenkinsons are gathered here.

The rustbucket on which they perished is recalled on Filey Promenade and you can see where she went down on a ‘thumbnail’ chart at Wreck Site.

Polygon Wood

PolygonWood

Before the Great War began the wood may have had this exact shape – but probably a different mix of tree species. It was fought over in October 1914 by, amongst other regiments, the 2nd Worcesters. When they returned in September 1917 –

…the aspect of the scene at dawn was very different from what it had been three years before. The open fields had been beaten into a desolate expanse of boggy shell-holes. Such trees as still stood had been stripped and broken. On the skyline to the left, a mere stubble of bare tree trunks marked the site of Polygon Wood.

The Battle for the Wood “raged” throughout the day of the 26th and in the hours of dark the area was subject to an intense bombardment.

…as dawn broke at 5am the artillery of both sides suddenly ceased their fire. For some minutes all remained under cover, then, as the guns did not recommence, men
ventured cautiously from their defenses and gazed around in wonder. The intense bombardment of two days and nights had beaten the whole area into a different
appearance. Such landmarks as had existed beforehand had disappeared. The surface of the ground from Stirling Castle to Gheluvelt had been churned up afresh, the whole
landscape was even more desolate and repulsive than before.

Source

The battle for Polygon Wood was effectively over. “Intermittent sniping alone
continued throughout the day of Thursday the 27th of September.”

Perhaps it was a sniper’s bullet that ended the life of Private Harold CRIMLISK of Filey, fighting with the 6th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment.

Harold is buried at Cement House Cemetery, about 12 kilometers distant from where he fell. There is a small cemetery at Polygon Wood and this source offers a gallery of 14 photographs showing the difference a hundred years make.

Harold and some of his forebears may be found in Filey Genealogy & Connections and on the FamilySearch Tree.  He also has a page on the Looking at Filey Wiki.