Little Warneford Annie

There isn’t a single representative of the WARNEFORD family name in Filey Genealogy & Connections. Kath’s database has Blanche Annie WARNFORD marrying Filey Draper Robert Dixon COLLEY. Born in “186-“, she doesn’t have a birthplace. The couple has two children, Edwin Warnford Colley and May, both born in Stockton, County Durham.

There is a small family of Warnefords enumerated in Queen Street, Filey, in 1881. Retired draper, Richard, his wife Elizabeth, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary. Richard had run a linen and woollen drapery business in York from around 1850 to the early 70s when he retired to the coast. In 1877 he bought at auction a house and shop on the South Cliff, Scarborough for £1,420 but clearly didn’t occupy the property for long.  After residing in Filey for a while he moved the thirteen miles to Bridlington, where he died aged 61 on June 4, 1886. His wife Elizabeth, nine years his junior, was living with married daughter Elizabeth in Sheffield in 1891. Daughter Mary, approaching 30 and single was there too. Both Warneford women were “living on their own means”. Head of household, daughter Elizabeth’s husband William Henry NEAVE, was described as a “Foreign Corresponding Clerk”, which sounds quite exciting.

There are more Elizabeth’s than are helpful in this family. Draper Richard seems to have first married Elizabeth BREALEY in 1854. She gave birth to William later that year and died the year after. (I’m basing this supposition on the death registration of an Elizabeth Warneford aged 28 in York.) Elizabeth the Second appears very clearly in the next four censuses, birthplace Howden, but I cannot find a second marriage source. Christening records are available for Elizabeth and Mary (mother just “Elizabeth”) but birth registrations for them, and for Blanche Annie are yet to be found.

There is a civil marriage record for Blanche Annie and Robert Dixon COLLEY in Stockton (1884) but at her death in 1922 she is just Annie.

FamilySearch offers two christening sources for Anne/Annie Warneford.

1860_WarnefordAnnie11861_WarnefordAnnie2

The 1871 census gives “All Saints” as the birthplaces of four children of Richard and Elizabeth I and II – William, Elizabeth, Mary and “Annie”. I can only find a birth registration for the Annie who is a daughter of Farmer John. This little Warneford didn’t marry, preferring to live à deux with female companions.

Are Anne, Annie and Blanche Annie the same person? There isn’t enough evidence yet to say for certain one way or the other. But, hey, remember Robert Dixon Colley was a draper.

Robert is one of the Skipsea branch of Colleys. They settled in Filey for many years, but I haven’t yet happened upon any that sleep here eternally. So, I am unlikely to extend their pedigree on FST.

Doubting Thomas

KNAPTONthosjenningsThis is the duplicate record for Thomas Jennings KNAPTON that caught my attention yesterday. Born in 1815, “my” Thomas was 41 years old when he married Sarah SMITH in Homerton, Middlesex. The couple’s first child, Annie Elizabeth, can be seen in the screenshot (left) You will notice that the children with the other Sarah were born between 1840 and 1849. It is theoretically possible that this was Thomas’ first family.

I already knew, however, that my Thomas Jennings, masquerading as “NAPTON”, was working as a draper’s assistant in High Ousegate, York in 1841, a single man living in the home of his employer, Robert BAINBRIDGE.

The GRO Index was available first thing this morning. Checking the births of the quartet of children revealed that their mother’s surname at birth was also SMITH. At the 1841 census, a Thomas Knapton and his wife Sarah were enumerated in Rawmarsh, Rotherham, with two children age 3 and 1. John, the youngest child in the screenshot, had an older brother, William. This Thomas worked as a coal miner. The next ten years saw the arrival of Mary, Elizabeth, Ann and George. Mary, of course, was missing from the 1851 household in Green Lane, Rawmarsh, but William, 13, was working down the pit and John, 10, would soon follow him below ground. With three wage-earners towards the end of 1851, the family may have been managing just fine.

Five days before Christmas, Thomas and John were killed in a methane explosion at the Warren Vale pit. They were among 32 miners whose funerals took place on the 23rd December. Nine more were buried the following day. In all, 52 men and boys lost their lives in the disaster. There is an account of the event online here.

Mr Burgin went down the pit again and gave an account of the operations that went on to […] inspect the mine and recover the bodies.

“We then got some tarpaulin sheets and nailed them in place of the trapdoors and stoppings, which were all blown down. We continued on the level where we found six bodies. We then went to the No.3, or far most bank, and found Thomas Knapton, Henry Gothard, Joshua Bugg, Charles Sylvester and Benjamin Lane.

They were all dead…

In 1861, Elizabeth, now 17, and her brother George, 12, were living with their uncle John Knapton, a coal owner and farmer. I couldn’t find their mother’s death as a Knapton. I think she remarried before 1861 but I haven’t attempted to trace her.

A sad case of mistaken identity on the Shared Tree.