Migrating Birds

Robert BIRD ran a successful business as a tailor and woollen draper in Queen Street, Filey, for a quarter of a century or more. He seems to have had only two children with Ruth nee POSGATE; Mary Jane born in 1835 and Samuel Robert who arrived twelve years later. Both were with their parents when the 1861 census was taken. Mary Jane married in 1864 and built a nest with Alfred STATHERS. Robert retired from business not long afterwards and flew south to London where the enumerator found him in Hungerford Road, Islington, with Ruth and Samuel Robert, 24, who was working as a junior clerk in the Public Record Office. The trio had a lodger, a commercial traveller in the woollen trade called Adolph WEPPLER, who had been blown across the German Ocean by the winds of fate. The live-in servant, Elizabeth STATHERS, aged 40 and unmarried, was most probably Mary Jane Bird’s sister in law.

The older Birds may have tired of the Great Wen because ten years later they are enumerated in Westcott, just outside Dorking. They are living at The Lodge – and I want to believe they had a few contented years in this small property –

Nowadays, you would have to hand over about £600,000 to acquire ownership but, hey, it is only a couple of hundred metres from Nirvana Cycles.

Robert died in January 1885 and the homing instinct in Ruth was too strong to keep her in Surrey. She is buried in Filey – and her stone remembers Robert. I have put a photograph of it on the Shared Tree.

Path 127 · Headland Way

to Speeton Sands

The Bankrupt Brothers

Elizabeth Christiana VICKERMAN married Bridlington sailmaker Thomas SCRIVENER in 1809 and in the next fifteen years gave birth to at least six children. I do not know when she died but Thomas married again in January 1831 when he was 44 and Anna CALAUM 35. Henry Thomas was born at the end of November 1831 and Charles Waters in April 1834.

On Monday I mentioned the unusual bond the brothers had. I said that when William Charles Scrivener was born “maternal grandmother Elizabeth Sweet was also his aunt”. This is a true statement but it does not tell the whole story. William’s birth was registered in the June Quarter of 1867, eleven years after the widow SWEET married his uncle Henry Thomas. His father, Charles, married Elizabeth’s firstborn daughter in St Oswald’s, Filey on the 15th of May that year, when she was either near term or already a mother. Impossible to say when Elizabeth attained her grandmother to William status. She died before the year was out.

Why would a 24 year-old fellow marry a widow twenty years his senior and a mother of seven children, five still living? For love or money?

Some sources claim that Elizabeth’s first husband, William Sweet, was a solicitor but I think he was only a solicitor’s clerk. She may not have been a rich widow. In 1851, aged 20, Henry was working as a draper, but enumerated at an establishment in St Pancras that housed 55 boys and men between the ages of 13 and 47 (median age 25) – an assortment of carpet salesmen, cashiers, clerks – and drapers. I do not know what accidents or designs took him from the capital to the far north of England but in 1861, five years after marrying, he was head of a household in the parish of St Andrew, Newcastle upon Tyne, a “Mustard Manufacturer employing 2 Men”. (Elizabeth’s father in law, Samuel Sweet, had been a Mustard manufacturer.) Three of Elizabeth’s children were at home, including Jane Elizabeth, Henry’s his sister-in-law to be but described by the enumerator as his “daughter-in-law”.

The following year Henry declared himself bankrupt and, for reasons I cannot fathom, was still a bankrupt six years later.

Younger brother Charles Waters Scrivener set out on a more elevated career path. Aged 17 in 1851, he was a Student of Medicine in Hull. I have not been able to find him in the 1861 census but in 1871 he was living in Clarence Terrace, Filey (now West Avenue), an “MD Doctor”. With him were Jane, their second son Thomas, Jane’s sister Mary Elizabeth Sweet and a servant, Elizabeth FOSTER, 19. As mentioned on Monday, first son William Charles was with his grandfather on census night and it would appear that Mary was in Filey to help Jane in a time of trial. Four weeks after the census Mrs Scrivener was dead. She had given birth to three children in three years and had suffered the ignominy (maybe) of her husband’s bankruptcy.

Eighteen months after his wife’s death, Charles married again. His bride was Mary Ann WOODALL. Alas, it does not appear that her father was William Edward, Registrar of the Court.

By 1881, Charles seems to have re-established himself as one of Filey’s doctors. (In 1873 he was also Acting Assistant Surgeon of the 2nd East Riding of Yorkshire Artillery Volunteer Force.) The family of three had moved to 3 Rutland Street and with them was “June CALAM”, a single woman aged 62 described as Charles’ “sister-in-law”. I think this was Jane Ann CALAUM, daughter of Michael and Anna née BRAMBLES. Sources indicate that Charles’ mother, Anna CALAUM, was born eighteen years before Michael and Anna married. As I do not have Michael’s birth record yet, it is possible Jane and Anna were half-sisters.

Henry was a widower for just over five years. He married Jane WINN in Hartlepool in 1873 but I have not found a parish record that might have given his occupation. He had recovered remarkably from bankruptcy because in 1871 he claimed to be – a surgeon. He also told the enumerator he was 35 and had been born in Scarborough. On census night he was visiting widow Dora MORISON, 47, and her four children in Castle Eden, County Durham. Eldest son James, 17, was a Medical Student at Edinburgh University.

Henry died a Gentleman in 1879.

I have not been able to discover what he was doing at the Globe Hotel.

Brother Charles followed him to eternity about three years later and is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard, but nowhere near his first wife.

Dog 29 · Gizmo

The little fella migrated inland some time back. I hope he is keeping well.

Another Distant Horizon

There is a curious mismatch between the birth registration of Louisa Florence LING and the date of her parents’ marriage. The birth was registered in the June Quarter of 1878, with the Mother’s Maiden Surname given as MINORS. The marriage of Robert Ling and Emma Minors was not recorded by the authorities until the last quarter of 1880.

The 1881 census enumerator in Clerkenwell was derelict in his duty. Mrs Ling and her daughters suffered the same fate as most of their neighbours in being given first name initials. Louisa Florence is “F”. Later records would indicate that her birth names had been reversed. She would marry and be forever remembered as Florence Louisa.

The name change has flummoxed at least one online tree grower. In that parallel pedigree, George Simmons CAMMISH is married to a Yorkshire lass, Louisa Florence Ling from Lockwood. As already indicated, “F” first saw light in the Great Wen. I have no idea why she left the capital city but at the beginning of the new century she is in Filey. A journey of 200 miles brought her to the romantic attentions of a Filey grocer. She married George in St Oswald’s Church on 15 October 1902. The register shows her father to be deceased and, in life, a cigar maker. This was his occupation in 1871, when he was 19, but ten years later he is a draper. He died aged 38, when Florence was just twelve.

Florence and George did not have children of their own. The 1911 Census shows that they had adopted Beatrice Annie DREWSE, born in York three years before they had married. Beatrice is Mrs HUTCHIN when her adoptive father dies.

Harrison Cammish is George’s nephew, son of eldest sister Susannah, but he is not yet represented on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. (There is a Harrison Cammish with an ID, LV7T-NF1, but nothing else.) Find George and Florence here.

Path 114 · Old Tip

Little Warneford Annie

There isn’t a single representative of the WARNEFORD family name in Filey Genealogy & Connections. Kath’s database has Blanche Annie WARNFORD marrying Filey Draper Robert Dixon COLLEY. Born in “186-“, she doesn’t have a birthplace. The couple has two children, Edwin Warnford Colley and May, both born in Stockton, County Durham.

There is a small family of Warnefords enumerated in Queen Street, Filey, in 1881. Retired draper, Richard, his wife Elizabeth, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary. Richard had run a linen and woollen drapery business in York from around 1850 to the early 70s when he retired to the coast. In 1877 he bought at auction a house and shop on the South Cliff, Scarborough for £1,420 but clearly didn’t occupy the property for long.  After residing in Filey for a while he moved the thirteen miles to Bridlington, where he died aged 61 on June 4, 1886. His wife Elizabeth, nine years his junior, was living with married daughter Elizabeth in Sheffield in 1891. Daughter Mary, approaching 30 and single was there too. Both Warneford women were “living on their own means”. Head of household, daughter Elizabeth’s husband William Henry NEAVE, was described as a “Foreign Corresponding Clerk”, which sounds quite exciting.

There are more Elizabeth’s than are helpful in this family. Draper Richard seems to have first married Elizabeth BREALEY in 1854. She gave birth to William later that year and died the year after. (I’m basing this supposition on the death registration of an Elizabeth Warneford aged 28 in York.) Elizabeth the Second appears very clearly in the next four censuses, birthplace Howden, but I cannot find a second marriage source. Christening records are available for Elizabeth and Mary (mother just “Elizabeth”) but birth registrations for them, and for Blanche Annie are yet to be found.

There is a civil marriage record for Blanche Annie and Robert Dixon COLLEY in Stockton (1884) but at her death in 1922 she is just Annie.

FamilySearch offers two christening sources for Anne/Annie Warneford.

1860_WarnefordAnnie11861_WarnefordAnnie2

The 1871 census gives “All Saints” as the birthplaces of four children of Richard and Elizabeth I and II – William, Elizabeth, Mary and “Annie”. I can only find a birth registration for the Annie who is a daughter of Farmer John. This little Warneford didn’t marry, preferring to live à deux with female companions.

Are Anne, Annie and Blanche Annie the same person? There isn’t enough evidence yet to say for certain one way or the other. But, hey, remember Robert Dixon Colley was a draper.

Robert is one of the Skipsea branch of Colleys. They settled in Filey for many years, but I haven’t yet happened upon any that sleep here eternally. So, I am unlikely to extend their pedigree on FST.

Doubting Thomas

KNAPTONthosjenningsThis is the duplicate record for Thomas Jennings KNAPTON that caught my attention yesterday. Born in 1815, “my” Thomas was 41 years old when he married Sarah SMITH in Homerton, Middlesex. The couple’s first child, Annie Elizabeth, can be seen in the screenshot (left) You will notice that the children with the other Sarah were born between 1840 and 1849. It is theoretically possible that this was Thomas’ first family.

I already knew, however, that my Thomas Jennings, masquerading as “NAPTON”, was working as a draper’s assistant in High Ousegate, York in 1841, a single man living in the home of his employer, Robert BAINBRIDGE.

The GRO Index was available first thing this morning. Checking the births of the quartet of children revealed that their mother’s surname at birth was also SMITH. At the 1841 census, a Thomas Knapton and his wife Sarah were enumerated in Rawmarsh, Rotherham, with two children age 3 and 1. John, the youngest child in the screenshot, had an older brother, William. This Thomas worked as a coal miner. The next ten years saw the arrival of Mary, Elizabeth, Ann and George. Mary, of course, was missing from the 1851 household in Green Lane, Rawmarsh, but William, 13, was working down the pit and John, 10, would soon follow him below ground. With three wage-earners towards the end of 1851, the family may have been managing just fine.

Five days before Christmas, Thomas and John were killed in a methane explosion at the Warren Vale pit. They were among 32 miners whose funerals took place on the 23rd December. Nine more were buried the following day. In all, 52 men and boys lost their lives in the disaster. There is an account of the event online here.

Mr Burgin went down the pit again and gave an account of the operations that went on to […] inspect the mine and recover the bodies.

“We then got some tarpaulin sheets and nailed them in place of the trapdoors and stoppings, which were all blown down. We continued on the level where we found six bodies. We then went to the No.3, or far most bank, and found Thomas Knapton, Henry Gothard, Joshua Bugg, Charles Sylvester and Benjamin Lane.

They were all dead…

In 1861, Elizabeth, now 17, and her brother George, 12, were living with their uncle John Knapton, a coal owner and farmer. I couldn’t find their mother’s death as a Knapton. I think she remarried before 1861 but I haven’t attempted to trace her.

A sad case of mistaken identity on the Shared Tree.