The Two Husbands of Hannah Welburn

The Hoylands of Hoyland Common confirmed my fondness for geographical rather than trade family-names. (You can keep your bakers, turners and, especially, smiths.)

Hannah is a WELBOURNE in some sources, but I will favour WELBURN. Hannah was born in 1839 in Pickering, which is just fourteen miles from the village of Welburn. There is a Welbourn in Lincolnshire and one online fount of knowledge claims this is the original home of all Welbourns. The variant spellings, including Welburn, may all mean the same thing – a well by a stream or spring – so the first English Welburns could be from anywhere.

Hannah’s father James was a cooper and after her birth, the family moved a few miles to Driffield. There are sources on FamilySearch for Hannah and three siblings, but they don’t yet form a coherent unit on the Shared Tree.

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In 1861, at the age of 21, Hannah is enumerated at the family home in Westgate, Driffield, her occupation given as “Publisher’s Labourer”. Six years later she marries Samuel Sanderson HARRISON. In 1871 Samuel is described as a “Shopman (Draper’s Assistant)”. He clearly did well at the job because in 1881 he is a “Draper Master”. The couple remains childless though, and in the autumn of 1888, Samuel dies aged 46.

Hannah is named in the probate documents, but a young man called Alfred Herbert WELBURN (sometimes WELBOURNE) has insinuated himself into the family. He was a 14-year-old visitor at the 1881 Census and supposedly a nephew of Samuel, but in 1891he is head of the Harrison home in Middle Street South, Driffield, occupation Draper. Hannah is the next named, a widow “living on her own means”. Alfred was the son of Hannah’s brother, Richard.

In the summer of 1893, Alfred marries Mary Anne ROSS, Hannah’s stepdaughter. Her marriage to Primitive Methodist Minister Castle Ross had been registered three months earlier.

In 1901 Hannah is with Castle and his daughter Jane, a 26-year-old Music Teacher, in Glastonbury, Somerset. In 1911 the Minister’s house in Bournville is somewhat more populous. In addition to Hannah, there are Castle’s daughters Margaret, still single at 31, and Emily. Emily’s husband Alfred Wilson is there too, with their children Dorothy and Emily.

Hannah dies in Bournville in the spring of 1914, aged 74.

Castle returns to Filey, the place of his birth, dying here in 1928 aged 88. The inscription on his stone in St Oswald’s churchyard doesn’t “remember” Hannah.

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In loving memory of CASTLE ROSS, Primitive Methodist Minister,

who entered the higher life May 23rd 1928, aged 87 years.

Also of JANE, wife of the above, who passed on Oct 25th 1882, aged 45 years;

interred in Brigg cemetery.

‘For me to live is Christ and to die is gain’

Phil. 1. 21

Today on the Shared Tree he has only one wife, but the Welbourne connection is clearly indicated.

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Castle’s youngest daughter, Margaret Maud, is named in the probate documents and it is perhaps she who decided what the inscription should be on her father’s headstone. I feared initially that Hannah had been “disappeared” without a sign anywhere of her existence, but was happy to discover that she is remembered on her first husband’s gravestone in Driffield.

A Missing Marriage

The funeral of Ann ALDEN took place 102 years ago. She was buried close to her son William, who had died eleven years earlier, and her yearling nephew William Edwin. (A cross marks their spot.)

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On the 1911 census form, William wrote that he had been married for 46 years and that he and Ann had eight children, of whom one had died. I have found the birth registrations of seven children, so one is missing.

I have been unable to find a civil or parish record of the marriage, so that is missing too.

Ann’s firstborn, Joseph, arrived on 11 April 1865, 45 years and 51 weeks before the 1911 census. William’s calculations may have been misjudged but I could not turn up a marriage in England and Wales in 1863 or 1864.

A woman called Ann Raine did, however, marry in Driffield in the last quarter of 1864. This town is not many miles from Lebberston, where the Aldens lived for most of their married life. This Ann’s husband was either Thomas BOYES or William HOLLAND. Before you write both fellows off, say Alden and Holland a few times, aloud. It is a stretch, I know, but perhaps the clerk was hard of hearing.

William and Ann’s children are no trouble to the Scarborough Registrar, though the mother’s maiden surname is not always right as RAIN. So the missing marriage registration is odd. A cursory search for Holland children between 1864 and 1870 found none in the East Riding of Yorkshire. In the same period, Driffield saw an influx of BOYES (both sexes), some of them the offspring of the aforementioned Thomas and his wife Martha STOCKELL.

Marriages Dec 1864
Boyes  Thomas    Driffield  9d 571
Holland  William    Driffield  9d 571
Raine  Ann    Driffield  9d 571
Stockell  Martha    Driffield  9d 571

Source: Free BMD

Find Ann on FamilySearch Tree.

Little Criminals

In May 1878, a 14-year-old youth called Arthur DOBSON faced a charge of stealing a horse and a set of harnesses, the property of Arthur JACKSON of Scalby Lodge Farm. Inspector DOVE explained that Dobson had taken the horse, wandered on his way and, without anyone noticing, hitched the animal to a waggon belonging to Martin ABBEY of Wykeham Carr. Nonchalantly, he had called at the house of a Mr WILSON in Ayton. He spun a yarn:-

…stating he was going to Sherburn for a load of bran for Mr Jackson, who had told him to put the horse up at Mr Wilson’s stable, and he would afterwards pay him for his trouble. Mr Wilson, being a relation of Jackson’s, assented, and the horse was stabled, and the lad preparing for bed, when Police-sergeant Heald arrived and took him into custody.

The case was remanded and I don’t know the outcome but the report in The York Herald, quoted above, continued:-

It may be mentioned that the prisoner is the same youth who, a few days ago, was charged with being secreted in the Market Hall, and discharged with a caution, the directors not willing to prosecute.

I could not find birth or census records that pinned down this miscreant. Confident in his ne’er do wellness I searched newspapers and found several young men with the same name who had done bad things. One kicked a drinking partner to death. Another passed fraudulent cheques.

I expect farmer Martin got his waggon back. But only a couple of months earlier, a farm labourer named Thomas HARLAND was charged at Scarborough on suspicion of stealing two hams, the property of Mr Martin Abbey, Wykeham Carrs, during the night of 27th February. I don’t know the outcome of this case either, but I suspect the hams were never seen again. I haven’t been able to track down the accused, though I didn’t try very hard.

I looked again at the census returns that detailed Martin’s household, which included all the servants living in. No names leapt out – except that of his niece, Mary Jane LOVEL. When she was just seven (and Martin 18), she was caught by the 1851 census at Wold Farm, West Heslerton, which was run by Martin’s widowed mother. Little had changed in the family by 1861. Ten years later, Martin had his own farm at Wykeham but his mother was still working the land at West Heslerton, and her granddaughter, Mary Jane was her housekeeper, now aged 27 and as yet unmarried.

Clearly, something had happened to Mary Jane’s parents. Her mother, Ann, was an older sister to Martin and had married Jonathan LOVEL in January 1840. At the census the following year the couple are living in Driffield, with first-born Philip. Jonathan is a butcher. Ann gave birth to Mary Jane in 1844 and died in January 1848. Jonathan followed her to the grave in March 1850 but in the intervening period, he found himself in court.

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Not a criminal then, just a brute. The only Mahala Lawson I could find who seems right was about 15 years old at the time of the incident described. Born in Horncastle, Lincolnshire to Francis, a shoemaker, and his wife Edey, she returned to her birthplace and married Matthew MORLEY, an agricultural labourer, in the spring of 1858. They had several children. Mahala died in 1919, aged 86. She has several IDs on FamilySearch, each generated by the birth of a child but not yet merged into a single family.

Big Criminals

Classiarius: Hubristic Globalism has failed.

‘Lucy’ Weathers the Storm

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Information supplied by Captain Syd informs us that Lucy was a 61-foot yawl with a lute stern built in Scarborough in 1878. Her first owner was William JENKINSON of Filey, almost certainly the father of Richard, named above. What eventually became of the vessel isn’t noted.

William JENKINSON is on FamilySearch Tree. Richard has a “guesswork wife” in Filey Genealogy & Connections and it appears that FST isn’t sure about her identity either. But the childless couple has a fine stone in the churchyard. I’ll try to confirm that Mary  Ann was a CRAWFORD when time permits.

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Challenger SH97 was a little smaller than Lucy, and older, built at Whitby in 1857. In 1889 her owners were Richard Williamson HARRISON and Thomas Storry HARRISON, both decorators of West Square, Scarborough. Richard Williamson became sole owner less than two months before Thomas Cammish WILLIS was drowned.

Thomas was alone at Challenger’s helm, about 32 miles east of Flamborough Head, when a huge wave broke over the vessel and swept him overboard. His seven or eight crewmates were presumably unaware of his disappearance for a short time but they would have been unable to save him had they realized immediately he had gone. Thomas left a widow and six children.

Ann KIRBY is another FG&C guesswork wife but I believe Kath chose well. She doesn’t give us the parents but FST has placed Ann as a child with the wrong family.

Two young KIRBY men from the Driffield area, apparently brothers Robert and William, married two COWLING women from Filey, Rachel and Margaret. The two Kirby-Cowling partnerships were near neighbours in Little Kelk when the 1861 Census was taken and paterfamilias Robert Kirby senior lived close by. Unluckily for confirmation purposes, Ann, aged 13, was enumerated that year in Queen Street, Filey, described as the niece of John JENKINSON and his wife Ann, née COWLING. Ann was sister to a Rachel and Margaret but FG&C has the latter marrying Thomas HUNTER.

I’m convinced William, and not Robert junior, was Ann’s father. I haven’t found a marriage record yet but the GRO Online Index and Census records combine to show he had five other children with Margaret COWLING, and the last was named  John Cowling KIRBY, which seems to be a clincher.

Ann and her sister Mary are only enumerated together with William and Margaret in 1851. Mary didn’t marry and she was living with Ann and Thomas Cammish WILLIS in 1891, and with widow Ann and unmarried son David WILLIS in 1911.

All this, of course, is by the by. A man died before his time and six children lost their dad. The eldest, Elizabeth Ann, was then 19 and the youngest, Frances Mary, just three.

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In Loving Memory of our dear mother and father, ANN WILLIS, wife of

THOMAS C. WILLIS, who died May 4 1917, aged 69 years.

Also of the above THOMAS C. WILLIS who was lost at sea,

February 22 1893, aged 47 years.

‘Be ye also ready’

Also, MARY KIRBY, sister of the above, died September 30 1927, aged 78 years.

Also of DAVID WILLIS, their son, died 12 Sep 1944 aged 61.

‘In Heavenly love abiding’

Difficult Births, Problem Children

I mentioned a while ago that the discovery of the GRO Online Index had changed my research life. No more waiting until 1911 for Free BMD to begin offering the maiden surnames of mothers.

Taking a break from Filey people, I looked at some of my own folk a few days ago. I have two grandaunts, Annie and Daisy ELSOM, who married fellows called WARD. Charles Edward was born in 1882 and Dick in 1889, both in Hull. But, like the STORMs mentioned a few days ago, they were not related by blood.

Dick was the son of William Edward WARD and Lizzie King HODSON and the GRO Index readily served him up with eight siblings.

Lizzie’s birth family is a different story. I will try to keep this simple. A composite picture of the HODSONs can be stitched together from the three censuses – 1861 to 1881. There are eight children born to Henry Hawkesley HODSON and Elizabeth King HANN. A ninth, Emma, is revealed by the GRO Index to have arrived and departed midway between 1861 and 1871. There is a cuckoo in the nest in 1861 – Henry’s 9-year-old stepson “George J. DRUMMEY”, who subsequently disappears, possibly into the navy and across the pond to the United States.

GeorgeDRUMMEY

The Census gives George’s birthplace as “Baston”, Lincolnshire. The GRO records him as George DEVANNEY, born December Qtr 1851 in Glanford Brigg, Mother’s Maiden Surname “KINGHAN”. (Barton upon Humber is in that registration district.) Elizabeth King HANN had married John DEVANNEY in Hull the previous year.

I have been unable to find a record of John’s death, but Elizabeth DEVANNEY marries Henry HODSON in Hull in 1860. A few months later they are at 3, John’s Place, St Mary Sculcoates, with George and three HODSON children – Ann Mary (age 5), Maria (3) and Harriet (0); mother’s maiden name for all three is HANN. Was Henry their father?

Lizzie King HODSON is the next child to happen along, in late 1863; birth registered in Driffield to mother DEVANNEY.

Thereafter:-

1865, Emma (KING)

1866, Charles (KING)

1868, Annie Helen (HANN)

1870, Harry (KING)

1873, Ada (DEVANNEY)

So, Elizabeth offered her maiden surname to the registrar for just four of her ten children (plus KINGHAN). Why she would give her first married name when registering her last child is a puzzle. Or at least it was until I dipped into Mark D. Herber’s Ancestral Trails and discovered that it wasn’t “a duty”  for those present at a birth to report it to a registrar at all until almost forty years after the civil registration system was established.  Hardly surprising, then, that in some parts of the country  15% of births were not registered between 1837 and 1875. (Neither was a registrar entitled to request sight of a marriage certificate or license.)

Parents misdirecting registrars in this way is a bit annoying – and it has a curious effect on Find My Past’s ability to deliver useful Hints. FamilySearch isn’t knocked out of its hint stride but there is some explaining to do when adding GRO sources to the World Tree. It took me the better part of two days to set up the Hodsons and Wards who were brought into my fold by grandaunt Daisy.

Elizabeth King HANN was already on FST but I had to create records for most of her children and WARD grandchildren. Other than Dick and Daisy’s son Reginald none of these people are related to me by blood, but I persevered because my headmistress at Stoneferry Junior & Infants in the 1950s was a Hodson, and a fellow pupil one Maurice Devanney, so I hoped to make connections! (I haven’t, yet.)