Who is Mr. Reed?

The Crimlisk/Siddle survey of the St Oswald churchyard places a stone remembering Thomas MOSEY and his unfortunate son in Area H. My digitization of the typescript runs as follows:-

H11

To the Memory of THOMAS MOSEY, who died Jan 15th 1826, aged 49 yrs

‘In life much respected and in death much lamented’

JOHN, son of the above, who was drowned in The River Thames, Feb 5th 1819,

aged 17 years, and was interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel                   Road, London.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society version of the Monumental Inscriptions differs slightly and inconsequentially with regard to punctuation – except where Mr. Reed is referenced.

2210

…interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel Road. London.

Mind the gap! I don’t have the Crimlisk typescript to hand but my guess is that the name of the road – the address of the Chapel – is missing, unreadable. The Mosey stone has since disappeared.

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Some relocated and ‘H’ stones against the north wall, photographed this afternoon

The Reverend Andrew REED founded a school in London in 1813 and its current incarnation in Sandy Lane, Cobham, is an impressive institution. Just the sort of place to which a shipowner might send his child. Alas, Reverend Reed’s founding aim was

…to provide relief to destitute orphans, ‘to rescue them from the walks of vice and profligacy…

His first Orphan Asylum was a house in Shoreditch, so perhaps there isn’t a connection here to young Mosey. Tantalisingly, though, Rev. Reed became minister of New Road Chapel in 1811 following his training. It was later known as the Wycliffe Chapel and he remained in the post there until he was 74 years old (1861).

I couldn’t find a newspaper account of John’s drowning, and he doesn’t have a place yet on FamilySearch Tree. He is the third child of 15 on FG&C. All the children are given a Scarborough birthplace but there is a strong family connection to Filey. Rather touchingly, John was a first cousin once removed to Thomas Henry SUGGIT who died in 1862, aged 14, in a fall from the Carr Naze cliffs. (See LaF Redux post ‘About a Boy’, 6 October.) I hope to connect them on FST before too long.

Men Overboard

On this night in 1925, Robert Haxby JOHNSON fell from the steam drifter G.E.S. and efforts by other crew to rescue him were unsuccessful. The fishing boat was 36 miles East by North of Scarborough.

Twenty-two years earlier, and about five miles from Scarborough, a sudden squall capsized the herring coble Wild Rose and it began to sink.

…Two of the crew, Thomas H. Cowling, the skipper, who is 70 years of age, and T. Holmes, had just time to scramble into their small boat before the Wild Rose went down. Jenkinson Cowling, another of the crew, swam alongside the coble, and the fourth man, John Willis, went down with the vessel. His more fortunate companions were of the opinion that he was thrown against the halyards by the lurching of the boat, and, being unable to clear himself in time, was dragged down with it…

Aberdeen Press and Journal, 4 February 1903

The three were rescued by the crew of another coble, Romeo and Juliet, which just made it into Scarborough harbour “in a sinking condition”.

Robert Haxby JOHNSON was 36 years old and is remembered on the gravestone of his maternal grandparents Richard HAXBY and Hannah née CAMMISH.

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In Loving Memory of ROBERT, the beloved husband of ELIZABETH JOHNSON, who was drowned Jan 29th 1925 aged 36 years.

Robert isn’t on FamilySearch Tree yet but his Filey Genealogy & Connections pedigree is extensive.

John married Ann Watkinson DAY in 1894 when he was 21 years old, and the couple had 5 children in their short time together. FamilySearch has three of the children but one, Harry, was fathered by Walter WILLIS, a textile worker in the West Riding. Again, FG&C is currently the more reliable source for this Willis branch pedigree.

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In Loving Memory of JOHN WILLIS, died Feb 26, 1919, aged 20 years.

Also JOHN WILLIS, father of the above, who was drowned at sea Jan 29, 1903, aged 30 years.

We shall meet again

 

The Barque ‘Unico’

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Unico came to grief on Filey Brigg this day 1871. I favour her being the “barque” of the memorial obelisk rather than the “schooner” of this vivid report of her demise in the Driffield Times, 21 January.

Wreck and Loss of 13 Lives at Filey

The Italian three-masted schooner Unico, captain Angelo Dodero, coal laden from Newcastle for Genoa, which brought up in Filey Bay on Sunday, dragged her anchors in a gale of wind, before daylight on Monday morning, and struck upon Filey Brigg, and went to pieces immediately. Of the whole crew, thirteen in number, only one man, Litano Maccouchi, was found alive upon the rocks. A Newcastle pilot was also drowned.

The Inquest

On Wednesday, an inquest was held at the Ship Inn, before J. M. Jennings, esq., coroner, on the bodies of three men cast on Filey Brigg, whose names are Gaetano Paganetti (mate), Carlo Lavaggi (able seaman), and Francesco Bugino (apprentice). From the evidence of Litano Maccouchi it appears that the vessel Unico, with a cargo of 600 tons of coal, sailed from Newcastle-upon-Tyne for Genoa, on the 11th inst., having on board Capt. Didero, a crew of 12, and a Tyne pilot named Corbett. The vessel arrived off Flambro’ Head on Saturday 14th, and being hazy, with strong wind from S.S.W. the pilot requested her to be anchored under Speeton Cliffs; this done the vessel rode safely until Monday morning, when, thick with rain, a fearful gale sprung up from S.S.E., which caused the ship to drag her anchor. The pilot at once requested sail to be made, anchor to be slipped, and stand out to sea; this was done, but in doing so the Unico struck upon the extreme end of Filey Brigg. A heavy sea was running at the time and so great was the concussion that the ship’s bottom was stove in; at this momentary crisis part of the crew got into three boats, which were on deck, the other part of the crew took refuge on the fore-rigging; no sooner done than an awful sea broke upon the ship, swept the deck, and hurled the boats into the gaping sea, thus drowning at one blow eight of the poor fellows; a twin mountain wave followed, which burst upon the ship, carrying away the foremast, upon which were the other six clinging for life, but these were also thrown amongst the breakers, which were spending their fury upon the fatal rocks, only one rose to the surface to grasp a piece of timber to which he tenaciously clung, when another wave lifted and cast him upon a safer part of the rocks; fearfully bruised and bewildered he climbed upon a higher rock, and upon this rock he sat shivering for more than an hour, when he was found by two fishermen, who carried him over rocks and to the Ship Inn, where every care and comfort was bestowed upon him.

James Gondrill, fisherman, said: I left my house on Monday morning about 7.15 a.m. and went on to the Brigg, when I met two fishermen carrying a shipwrecked man; I proceeded further on the rocks and espied another one of whose hands was uplifted firmly grasping some seed weed: with assistance I lifted him up and found him cold and dead; a little further on I found another lifeless man, both of whom were taken to the Ship Inn.

The Coroner, having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death.”

I think the reporter did rather better with the names of the unfortunate crew than whoever carved their names on the obelisk in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Here’s the Crimlisk transcription (the names are now obscured):

This stone is erected to commemorate a fearful shipwreck which took place

on Filey Brigg on 16 Jan 1871 of the Italian barque ‘Unico’ from Genoa

whereby 12 out of a crew of 13 including an English pilot perished

 

The following are interred in Filey Churchyard

ALGELO DODERO, Captain

GAETANO PAGANETTI, Mate

CARLO LAOAGGI, Seaman

FRANCESEAS BUGINO, Apprentice

and five others (Names unknown)

The East Yorkshire Family History Society transcription helpfully adds the Burial Register entries. These indicate that one body, supposed to be that of Captain DODERO, was not found for about ten days after the event and was interred with the others on 31 January.

*1871 Jan 19. Carlo Lauggi. Wrecked. 38.

*1871 Jan 19. Gaetano Paganetti. Wrecked. 37.

*1871 Jan 19. Francesco Bugiano. Wrecked. 17 yrs.

*These 3 men were washed up on Filey Brigg, from the wrecked barque Unico.

I walked to the overlook on Carr Naze this morning to photograph the scene of the wreck for Today’s Image. I was a little disappointed not be faced with a stormy sea and bruised sky but the upside was better light in the churchyard and Queen Street to picture two other elements of the story.

Fisherman “James Gondrill” was almost certainly James GOUNDRILL, born in Keyingham in 1839. At the census of 1871 he was living with his in-laws in Mosey’s Yard, off Queen Street, and working as a Gardener. Kath gives his occupation as Fisherman in Filey Genealogy & Connections but he began his working life as a Farm Servant (1851) and ten years later was a Servant to John Rook, the Miller at Mappleton. In 1881, still working as a gardener, he was living with wife Hannah and three daughters in Scarborough. The couple would return to Filey and be laid to rest in St Oswald’s churchyard. I didn’t have a photograph of their headstone in stock, probably because it is so hard to read, being well coated in lichen.

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In loving memory of HANNAH, the dearly beloved wife of JAMES GOUNDRILL, who died April 19th 1898 aged 52 years.

For to live in Christ and to die is gain.

Also the above JAMES GOUNDRILL, who died Sep. 9th 1905, aged 66 years.

The grass withered, the flower fadeth. The word of God stands forever.

James and Hannah are on FamilySearch Tree but without their full complement of offspring and for the most part disconnected from their forebears. When I find the time I’ll attempt to bring them all together. I had a quick look at Italian records for Unico’s named crew without success. I hope Litano Maccouchi recovered from his ordeal and lived well, to a great age.

I walked the short distance to Queen Street to photograph the Ship Inn, sometime after 1871 re-named the T’awd Ship, and now a private dwelling.

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There is a fine view of the Bay at the end of the street and from Cliff Top a cargo ship was heading north beyond the Brigg. It was the Mistral, a Ro-Ro flying a Finland flag, heading for Teesport from Zeebrugge. Calm sea certainly, prosperous voyage maybe.

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The Brothers Chow

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Eight years after Elizabeth Richardson searched the Filey shore for her husband’s body, the family CHOW sought two of their own – brothers, Francis and James. Robert and Mary née PEARSON have ten children listed in Kath’s database, Filey Genealogy & Connections but only three had PIDs on FamilySearch until today.

FG & C has Robert drowning with his sons on 14 January 1808 but I have yet to find an official record to confirm this. This headstone offers circumstantial evidence that Robert lies beneath with  Francis and James, and that two months of searching separated discovery of the brothers’ bodies. The following verse is mostly hidden now but it was recorded by George Shaw in his book,  Rambles Round Filey, 1886 and is included in the East Yorkshire Family History Society transcription.

Most epitaphs are vainly wrote;

The dead to speak it can’t be thought;

Therefore, the friends of those here laid,

Desired that this might be said.

That rose two brothers, sad to tell,

That rose in health, ere night they fell –

Fell victims to the foaming main;

Wherefore awhile they hid remain.

Friends for them sought, and much lament,

At last the Lord to those them sent.

So child and widow may bemoan

O’er husband’s and o’er father’s tomb.

The EYFHS transcription adds the burial records for the brothers; James being interred on 24 January and Francis on March 25th, 1808.

The family unit isn’t complete on FST yet but here is the link to husband and father, Robert CHOW. By the time George, his youngest son, died in 1864 the family name was CHEW.

A Loving Wife

Extract from Household Words, Charles Dickens

The sea-side churchyard is a strange witness of the perilous life of the mariner and the fisherman. It is only by a walk in it that we acquire a clear conception of the real nature of that mode of livelihood which such hundreds of thousands, all round these islands, embrace, as a choice or a necessity. We resort to pleasant places in the summer time, and see the great ocean glittering and rolling in playful majesty, and our hearts leap at the sublime spectacle.

We see white sails gleaming on its bosom, and steamers trailing their long clouds of smoke after them, as they busily walk the waters, bearing joyous passengers to many a new scene. We meet the hardy blue-cloth sons of ocean, on the beach and the cliff; see them pushing off their boats for a day’s fishing, or coming in in the early morning with their well-laden yawls and cobbles, and the sea and its people assume to us a holiday sort of aspect, in which the labour, the watching, the long endurance of cold, the peril and the death are concealed in the picturesque of the scenery, and the frank and calm bearing of the actors themselves.

What a different thing is even a fisherman’s life when contemplated as a whole; when we take in the winter and the storm to complete the picture of his existence! But, as few of us can do this in reality, if we wish to know the actualities of a sea-faring life, we may get a very fair idea of them in any seaside churchyard.

We lately took a survey of two such on the Yorkshire coast, and the notes which we there and then jotted down will afford some notion of the strange and touching records of such a place. Our first visit was to the churchyard of Filey, a mere village, well known to thousands of summer tourists for the noble extent of its sands, and the stern magnificence of its so-called bridge, or promontory of savage rocks running far into the sea, on which you may walk, at low-water; but which, with the advancing tide, becomes savagely grand, from the fury with which the ocean breaks over it.

In tempestuous weather this bridge is truly a bridge of sighs to mariners, and many a noble ship has been dashed to pieces upon it.

One of the first headstones which catches your eye in the little quiet churchyard of Filey bears witness to the terrors of the bridge. – “In memory of Richard Richardson, who was unfortunately drowned December 27th, 1799, aged forty-eight years :-

“By sudden wind and boisterous sea
The Lord did take my life from me;

But He to shore my body brought –
Found by my wife, who for it sought.
And here it rests in mother clay,
Until the Resurrection day.

“Also of Elizabeth, wife of the above, who died January 19th, 1833, aged eighty-nine.”

This fisherman was lost on the bridge, and his wife sought his body on the bridge for eleven weeks. She was possessed with an immoveable persuasion that there some day she should find him. All through that winter, from day to day, till late in March, she followed the receding tide, and with an earnest eye explored every ledge and crevice of the rocks, every inch of the wild chaos of huge stones that storms had hurled upon the bridge, and every wilderness of slippery and tangling sea-weed.

It was in vain that her neighbours told her that it was hopeless; that they assured her that she would get her death from cold; every day the solitary watcher might be seen, reckless of wind, or storm, or frost; and, at length, she did find the corpse of her husband, and saw it consigned to “mother clay.” She must have had a frame as hardy as her will and strong as her affections, for she survived this strange vigil of conjugal love thirty-four years, and to the age of nearly ninety.

The complete article can be read on the Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre website.

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The photograph is difficult to read but you can just make out the word “Child” at the base of the stone. In a note to Richard’s record in Filey Genealogy & Connections, Kath writes:-

He had been drowned from his coble at Christmas.  The story goes that his widow searched the Brigg for his body for 13 weeks in a terribly depressed state until she found him 13 weeks later.  Her baby was apparently neglected and left to the family but it too is supposed to have died.

I have found no record of a baby Richardson being buried around that time.

Two RICHARDSON children were baptized at St Oswald’s in the four years between Richard’s marriage to Elizabeth and his death but both Ann and Marianne were the children of John and Mary (maiden surname not known).

Elizabeth, Richard, and his parents are on the FamilySearch Tree.

The Coble ‘Mary’

The York Herald reported the tragedy on 19 December 1896.

Three Fishermen Drowned at Filey

During a strong E.N.E. breeze which prevailed at Filey on Monday, a local fishing coble, the Mary, owned by Mr. William Johnstone, was swamped to the south of the buoy at the end of the Brigg whilst returning from the fishing grounds off Speeton Cliffs, and the three occupants of the boat were drowned in the full view of a large number of fishermen and others assembled upon the cliff tops. The names of the unfortunate men are Robert Skelton (skipper), aged 37, who leaves a widow and two children; Thomas Johnson (25), who also leaves a widow and two children; and George Jenkinson, 18, single. The sunken coble put off from the town about half-past ten in the morning in company with four others. At the time indications were  not wanting of the heavy swell which afterwards arose. Notwithstanding, the five boats, of which the Mary was the smallest, being only 17 feet long, reached the fishing grounds in safety, and laid and worked their lines. At half-past eleven the wind had freshened considerably, and the sea running higher it was deemed advisable to return home. Preparations were made for this purpose, and all went well until they were about a mile from the shore, when the Mary, running before the swell, was chased and over-run. She sank immediately, and everything went out of sight. It could not be seen whether the men in her were entangled with the cordage or whether they floated for some little time, the other boats being some considerable distance away. The accident had been witnessed from the shore, and the lifeboat was instantly launched and proceeded to the spot, but with the exception of the men’s sou’-westers nothing could be seen of either coble or its occupants. The three men were all natives of Filey. They were very well known on the coast and amongst the fleets of the Southern boats which visit the locality in the summer, having previously assisted in life-saving from several wrecks. Johnson’s father was drowned 20 years ago within a short distance of the spot where he himself was engulphed.

The three lost fishermen are represented on the FamilySearch Tree but their families await assembly from the system-produced fragments. They are more clearly represented on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Robert SKELTON

George Thomas JOHNSON

George JENKINSON

Two of the three pedigrees carry information taken from the January 1897 Parish Magazine detailing the disbursements from money raised by a local appeal to assist the bereaved and straitened families.

…Total sum collected £320.00 Mrs Skelton whose youngest boy is 8yrs old will have 8 shillings a week for 6 yrs.  Mrs Johnson whose youngest girl is only 1 yr old will have 4 shillings a week for 12 yrs.  At the end of these periods, the children may then be able to work for themselves.  These payments will exhaust £240 or £120 each.  Mark Jenkinson, father of the drowned lad, will have 5 shillings a week for 4 yrs and Mrs Johnson senior mother of one of the drowned  men will have 2shillings 6pence a week for 5 yrs.  These payments will take rather over £50 & £30 respectively, and the slight deficiency will be met by the interest on money.

 

On a previous examination of the value of “old money”, I decided that considering “labour earnings” gave the most appropriate figure for a fishing community like Filey. So, £320 in today’s money (2017) is £131,600. This seems a huge amount to raise from  such a small town  so you should bear in mind that the RPI “basket of goods” figure is £33,200 (source Measuring Worth.)

Mrs. Skelton’s  8 shillings a week can be visualized as either £41.65 or £164.50 – or anywhere in between. Six years of the lower figure would have amounted to a little under £13,000.

I don’t have much of a head for figures but I find these price/value comparisons fascinating. I noticed in yet another Titanic video, watched today, that third class passengers paid £7 9s each to sail to their deaths; £677 to £2,708.

TitanicFares

In 1972, Sitmar Line charged me £225 for the five-week voyage to New Zealand, “all-inclusive”, aboard TSS Fairstar. That’s between £2,725 and £4,365. How times and prices change but maybe value not so much.

Fairstar

Two Brothers, Valued

At the  1861 Census, William JENKINSON was living at Hope Cottages, Filey, with his wife Frances and infant daughter Mary Elizabeth. His younger brother, Matthew, was in Mosey’s Yard with Jane née COATES and two children, William and Mary.

William was master of the yawl Hope, and in a gale on November 2nd that year he was lost.

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At the beginning of December two years later, Matthew was drowned from his coble in Filey Bay.  The Yorkshire Gazette of 5th December carried a vivid account of the tragedy.

Two Lives Saved by “The Hollon” Life-Boat

This life-boat only arrived at Filey last week, and was the gift of the Lord Mayor of York, by whom it was formally presented to the town of Filey on Thursday last. On Tuesday several cobles went off in the morning for the purpose of fishing. The wind was rising at the time, and about noon blew a gale from S.S.E., with a heavy sea running into the bay. Seeing that the cobles would return shortly from the fishing ground, the new life-boat was speedily got out, manned and launched, in readiness to render assistance. The arrival of the boats was watched with great excitement. One boat upset near the shore, and the crew, consisting of three men, were thrown into the sea. The poor fellows had to struggle for life, and eventually the despairing cries of those on shore were changed to joy as they saw the last of the three men washed upon the beach, the lives of all having been saved. Shortly afterwards, another coble came in sight, the storm, in the meantime, having increased. When some distance from the shore, a huge breaker lifted the frail boat as if it were a toy, upsetting it and throwing the crew into deep water. The life-boat sped to their assistance, and after great exertions, succeeded in rescuing two of the men from a watery grave.; but the third, named Matthew Jenkinson, was never seen after the boat upset. He has left a wife and four children.

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Two months after Matthew’s death, widow Jane took their fifth child to St Oswald’s to be baptized.

The Shipwrecked Mariner’s Society is now 178 years old and still “making a difference”.

One would expect Jane to receive more support from the Society but how much did the widows receive in today’s money? £6 5s. doesn’t seem a lot, does it?

There are several online calculators and those offering a single, and simple, answer usually satisfy curiosity. In this instance, Frances received £535 at 2016 prices. What’s that, roughly – two or three weeks’ wages?

The £535 figure is a calculation of the changing “real price” of a “commodity” valued at £6 5s over time, arrived at by multiplying the original sum by the annual percentage increase in “RPI”.

There are other ways to make the calculation, though, and they give wildly different figures.

Historic opportunity cost: £631

Assessing the labour value/labour earnings/labour cost of our commodity: £4,162

Income value/economic status: £5,606

Economic cost: £14,950

These terms are helpfully defined at Measuring Worth. For the two bereft Jenkinson families, I think “labour earnings” might be the most appropriate. So imagine Frances receiving about £4,000 and Jane £7,700. That would have helped a lot, perhaps, but both widows married again – Jane in 1870 to John PRESTON and Frances in 1872 to Thomas SEXTON.

William and Matthew’s parents have, like the CREASERs yesterday, loads of IDs to sort out on FamilySearch Tree. I have made a start but suggest you go to Filey Genealogy & Connections if you are interested in following the family fortunes in pedigree form.