Just Agnes from Somewhere

On my afternoon walk yesterday I bumped into the second great-granddaughter of Agnes in Glen Gardens. From the comfort of her mobility scooter, Ann was keeping an eye on her own great-granddaughter in the children’s playground. Our long-time-no-see conversation quickly turned to family history and I promised to look into one of Ann’s mysteries.

I will get to the main affair eventually (I hope) but was soon sidetracked by Agnes and Richard.

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I focused on this couple initially because they are remembered on a headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of RICHARD PASHBY, died Jan 28 1890, aged 50.

Also AGNES, wife of the above, died July 23 1897, aged 54.

Also FRANCES & EMILY, their daughters aged 23 & 27 years.

Also JANE HUNT, mother of the above, died Sep 23 1895, aged 91.

‘Forever with the Lord’

Also GEORGE NELSON, died in infancy.

As you can see from the screenshot, FamilySearch Tree is not very illuminating with regard to Richard and Agnes. Both are separated from their parents and neither can be pinned immediately to time or place. Record hints direct attention to useful Census returns but these haven’t yet to be attached to the pair.

Filey Genealogy & Connections is much more helpful, offering all eleven of the children that can be found in the GRO Births Index. (Infant “George Nelson“  was a grandson of Richard and Agnes.)

FG&C  gives Richard’s parents as Thomas Pashby and Jane CAMMISH but without the dates of their deaths. The MI above suggests that Thomas died quite young and Jane remarried. There is, indeed, a Free BMD record of Jane Pashby marrying Joseph HUNT in Scarborough in the December Quarter, 1856. On another fragment of pedigree awaiting connection on FST, there is a record hint for Richard’s older sister Ann, revealing the Pashby household sheltering lodger Joseph Hunt in 1851. He is a Somerset man, 12 years younger than Jane.

FG&C also does better with the birth family of Agnes, giving her parents and five siblings. Her mother, “Mrs Sarah Jackson” is a PEARSON in the GRO Births Index. All the children were born in Snainton near Scarborough. Father John was born in Ebberston, the next village westward along the present A170.

Now I’ll have to knuckle down to putting Agnes Jackson of Snainton on FST and adding her headstone photo… and joining Richard to the other section of his pedigree on the World Tree.

Herbert Gets What He Deserves

Thanks to Richard at the Bike Shop, Gail and others, Filey’s World Champion has received local recognition for his exploits on the track, way back in the 1880s. His blue plaque was unveiled in John Street this afternoon, for all to see 24/7.

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Fellow Briton Chris BOARDMAN rode 35 miles in an hour in 1996 – but not on a penny farthing.

FindHerbert on FamilySearch Tree, and the following posts about him, and his family, on Looking at Filey & Redux.

In the Wheel World 13 April 2011

Good at Cycling 3 Aug 2012

Cycling in Filey 6 Mar 2013

A Marriage Made in Cyberspace 3 Oct 2017

Minna, Lost 4 Nov 2017

Setting the Record Straight 5 Nov 2017

One Spring in Wintringham 7 Nov 2017

Dr Cortis Speaks 12 Nov 2017

Champion 28 Nov 2017

I visited the grave of his mother and younger brother this morning.

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Julian Gets What He Didn’t Deserve

Chris Hedges, Truthdig

Suggit/Suggitt

England appears to be the heartland for this family name, with around 75% found in Yorkshire in the second half of the 19th century. Not that this is readily apparent if you check out the Ancestry distribution maps online.

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Photographer unknown, no date

Thomas SUGGIT, a general merchant, grocer and ship owner of Filey, married Zillah AGAR on this day 1837. They were both about 24 years old, the average age for tying the first knot in Victorian Britain. They brought nine children into the world and seven lived long enough to marry. Firstborn William Agar died on the day of his birth and middle child  Thomas Henry was killed aged 14 in a cliff fall on Carr Naze. The others supplied Thomas and Zillah with at least 31 grandchildren, 19 of them Suggits.

A descendant, James, kindly provided Looking at Filey with a number of photographs – and the fruits of a project to find the origins of the family name. James plotted the locations of Suggits and variants in UK telephone directories and found the “epicentre” in Redcar, Cleveland. He thought the name could be of Scandinavian origin, from Søgaard, Siggaard or Sygurth perhaps.

The photo of Thomas came to me from another branch of the family, via Kath Wilkie, and I was informed that confidence in the identification was not quite a hundred per cent. But the sitter looks like a prosperous retired merchant to me and could easily pass for a Swede or Norwegian.

Thomas died in 1881 at Wenlock House in Church Street. Zillah continued living there until her death in January 1898.

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Photographed this morning

The presence of the anchor is possibly coincidental, but the owner who renovated the property a few years ago may have done some research and discovered Thomas owned several vessels. Captain Syd names the cutter Ebenezer and three yawls – Refuge and two named Zillah & Rachel (SH37 and SH95).

Find Thomas on FamilySearch Tree – and in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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A Fine Type of Englishman

I can’t remember how old I was when my father sat me down and explained that people lie. I do recall that he would subsequently say, often, that a particular person of his acquaintance would “lie and look at you”.

Theresa May has looked into a TV camera on hundreds of occasions in the last few years and lied to the British people. She continues to do so. She will never stop. (It’s clearly pathological.)

Claudius Galen WHEELHOUSE died a hundred and ten years ago. He was a surgeon of some renown, and in his years of retirement in Filey was variously a magistrate, churchwarden and chairman of several organizations at the centre of town life.

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Ah, those were the days, when people who served the public had high ideals of duty.

1849_OssyridecolumnsThebes_cgwAt the age of 29, Claudius was engaged by Henry PELHAM-CLINTON, Earl of Lincoln and later the 5th Duke of Newcastle, to take “medical charge” of a yacht setting out on a voyage around the Mediterranean. Claudius was able to indulge his interest in photography. He was an early practitioner of the Talbot-type process, producing paper negatives from which quantities of prints could subsequently be made. (Image left by Claudius is of the Osyride Columns at Thebes. Thirteen years later a rather more famous early photographer, Francis BEDFORD,  would follow in his footsteps.) The Mediterranean voyage ended in shipwreck but, safely back in England, Claudius presented his negatives to his employer. In March 1879 they were destroyed in a fire at Clumber House, along with many other works of art. Fortunately, Claudius had made an album of prints and the images lived on to illustrate some of his traveller’s tales.

One particularly wonderful story, told by Pam Smith, concerns a remarkable encounter between Claudius and another Filey ancient.

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In memory of CLAUDIUS GALEN WHEELHOUSE F.R.C.S., born 29th of December 1826, died 9th April 1909.

‘Waiting for the coming of our Lord Jesus’

And of AGNES CAROLINE, his wife, born October 10th 1824, died April 13th 1911.

Claudius died at Cliff Point, the former Coastguard House at the end of Queen Street.

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Postcard, no date, courtesy Christine Hayes

It may seem inappropriate to now take you back to Brexit but I watched a video this morning, made by a fine type of Swedish Man, and wanted to share it.

After the Workhouse

I returned to the John Stork Problem this morning. It isn’t going to be resolved anytime soon.

I did some more delving and found a snippet of pedigree that gave the cuckoo in the Filey Stork nest the correct parents – Henry and Hannah NETTLETON – but hasn’t yet married John to Hannah STEEL.

I also found “Right John” (after the system had initially denied his existence and I’d created an ID for him). This seems to do a good job of the children he had with Sarah HARPER but also gives him an earlier wife called Sarah TWINHAM. She has borne three children after her death but there’s another reason for her being “iffy”. I think she married a Thomas PICKERSGILL in York.

John’s true first wife, Sarah HARPER, gave birth to eight children before dying in 1864 aged just 37. FamilySearch Tree gives her mother’s name as “Mrs Margaret Harper”. In looking to confirm this, I turned up several christening records of Sarah and siblings being born to Robert Harper and Rebecca.

Five Harper children were born in Bridlington between 1818 and 1830 but I have only been able to find two of them in the 1841 census. Sarah, 15, and her younger brother Richard, 12, are in the Bridlington Workhouse. They are not listed together in the enumerator’s book, but their ages fit very well with their christening dates. What became of the parents and other children?

Sarah may have been resourceful, or perhaps life dealt her some better cards in her later teenage years. She met agricultural labourer John Stork and married him in 1849 when she was 23 years old. At the 1851 census, they are recorded in High Street, Bridlington, with their first child, Emily.

Their youngest child, Sarah, was only two years old when mother Sarah died. John married again the next year. Ann CHAPMAN may have been a good stepmother, and in 1871 she was also caring for Fanny CHAPMAN, a nurse child. This may have been the daughter of a brother because a birth registration for Fanny gives the infant’s mother’s maiden name as WATKINSON.

John and Sarah Harper’s seventh child, Rebecca (perhaps named after her grandmother), married John MOORE, a fisherman who later worked as a brickmaker’s labourer.

They had eleven children, of whom nine reached adulthood. John and Rebecca are remembered on a handsome stone in St Oswald’s churchyard. It stands quite close to the grave of Rebecca’s Uncle Robert Stork. Her father, “Right John”, has a Filey burial record but no known grave.

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A Companion for Today’s Robin

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I snapped this chaffinch in Crescent Gardens this morning and didn’t notice its warty feet until I processed the photo. It seems finches of several species are prone to Fringilla papillomavirus (FPV). The condition is also called papillomatosis or, colloquially, fur foot or bumblefoot. The “warts” don’t seem to affect the general health of the birds but may accumulate to such a degree that perching becomes problematic – and feet are sometimes lost.

Brother John

Robert STORK, son of Luke and husband of Margaret CHAPMAN and Rachel HUMPHREY, (and Filey’s Bellman for 28 years), had a younger brother, John.

John appears on the FamilySearch Tree as Robert’s brother and married to Anna STEEL. In Kath’s database, Filey Genealogy & Connections, brother John has two wives, Sarah HARPER and Ann CHAPMAN.

(There is another pedigree in FamilySearch Genealogies supplied by James Mutzelburg that favours John marrying “Hannah”.)

In the Bridlington Parish Church marriage register, the father of Hannah Steel is given as William, a miller. John’s father is Henry, a labourer. If this record is accepted at face value, this John is not Robert the Bellman’s brother.

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Eight years after the wedding, in High Street Bridlington, William Steel is living with his daughter and son in law, and two of their children – George and Jane Ann. William gives his birthplace as Eastrington. I think he is the William christened at Laxton, near Goole, in January 1794, the son of Robert and Elizabeth. A Burton Agnes marriage in 1817 to Elizabeth MASSENDER is possibly the union of this John’s parents.

The other John married Sarah HARPER in 1849 and two years later she gives her birthplace as Haisthorpe, near Burton Agnes. Sarah’s parents were possibly Robert and Rebecca.

To give you the two sets of children now would be confusing. I’ll just say that FST John may have had more children than he is given and some of those listed appear to have wayward birth years. Kath hasn’t given Luke Stork’s son John all his children either. I found two more.

The two Johns had one thing in common. They were both familiar with the inside of the same magistrate’s court.

FST John first…

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In 1871, John and Hannah gave their address as “The Hall, Haisthorpe”. Thirteen miles away, John is enumerated in King Street with five of his children and a nurse child, Frances CHAPMAN. His second wife, Ann Chapman, (not the mother of Frances), was away on census night. The household also contained a lodger, John McGURK, an Irish bootmaker.

And just down the street lived brother Robert and second wife Rachel Humphrey.

Bellman

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Photographer unknown, no date, courtesy Filey Museum

His headstone tells us that Robert STORK was Filey’s bellman for 28 years. The privilege of crying out the town news cost him, in today’s money, about £3,000. I’ve based this figure on a Local Board meeting report that Thomas WEBB had offered £1 7s 6d for the position of Town Crier, “a similar sum to that paid by the previous bellman, Robert STORK”. That was in 1902 and confirmation that Robert had just retired from the post is found in a news item of 1895:-

Filey’s aged and famed bellman, who in March will attain his 73rd birthday, whilst in August next he will attain his majority, having acted by that time for 21 years as bellman, proposed the health of Mr. Nicholson…

Thomas Webb, thrice married, had taken Robert’s daughter Mary Ann for his second wife.

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In loving memory of ROBERT STORK who died Sep 5th 1904, aged 82 years. For 28 years Town Crier.

‘His end was peace’

Also MARGARET his wife, who died Feb 2nd 1869, aged 49 years

‘Not dead, but sleepeth’

Also ELIZABETH their daughter, who died Dec 18th 1857, aged 6 years

‘She fell asleep in Jesus’

Also RACHEL STORK, wife of the above who died Nov 27 1909, aged 87 years

‘Prepare to meet thy God’

On FamilySearch Tree, Thomas is waiting for his third wife – and Robert’s brother John seems to be an impostor. I’m not quite sure how to deal with him as he has living descendants in America. I’ll make a case for the rightful brother and present it here in a day or two.