Glaves

Unusual family names are sometimes given to children. Glaves FOSTER’s mother was Ellis Glaves, born Cayton in 1791. In Filey Genealogy & Connections Ellis is often bracketed with Alice, but on FG&C Mrs Foster is plain Ellis.

Labouring the point perhaps, Ellis’s Father is Nesfield GLAVES, a son of Ellis (Alice) NESFIELD.

Glaves Foster’s maternal great grandfather, the husband of Ellis (Alice), was born in Seamer but the family moved a few miles to Cayton and then took another step to Gristhorpe.

Glaves was born in Gristhorpe in 1819 and died in “Newbeggin”. Now “Newbiggin”, there are quite a few places in the British Isles sharing the name. In Scotland, “biggin” or “bigging” means “a building, a house, a cluster of houses; a hamlet”. (Source: Scots Words and Place-Names). In England, the meaning is the same.

In 1861, Glaves was farming 225 acres at Little Britain, Gristhorpe but was at one of the Newbiggin farms by 1871. He died in 1875 and at the 1881 census his widow Mary was working their 320 acres with two unmarried sons and five Farm servants.

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Erected to the memory of GLAVES FOSTER of Newbeggin, who died March 11th 1875, aged 56 years

‘Watch therefore for ye know not

What hour your Lord doth come’

Also of MARY FOSTER, the beloved wife of the above, who died Nov 2nd 1885, aged 62 years.

‘The Lord my pasture shall prepare

And feed me with a shepherd’s care’

Find Glaves on FamilySearch.

The Brothers Philliskirk

George, named after his father and grandfather, was born in 1800. Harrison, six years later, took the surname of his paternal grandmother and Davison, from 1809, would carry his mother’s family name until his death.

All three were born in Bridlington, or that part known as Bridlington Quay, and George died in the town when he was 25 years old. Davison, the youngest of the three, married first, in Bridlington in April 1832. His bride was a Filey woman, Mary JENKINSON, and a few months later Harrison also married a Filonian, Mary WYVILL, in St Oswald’s Church. This second Mary was an aunt to the brothers James and Crompton Wyvill who married Jane WATKINSON (Monday and Tuesday’s posts).

Both marriages were long but neither was blessed with children.

Davison became a master saddler but then branched into property, multi-tasking as an estate agent. It seems he saw an opportunity when “New Filey” was established in the late 1850s. In 1861 he was Secretary to the York City and County Bank, encouraging people to buy shares in the Filey Public Bath and Saloon Company.

The many improvements recently carried out in FILEY, and particularly in the Hotels and Lodging Houses, have induced a much larger number of Families to visit the place during the Season than could at one time have been anticipated, and Filey has now become one of the most fashionable Watering Places on the Yorkshire Coast.

As a further attraction, and to comply with the wishes of many of the Visitors, some of whom have been compelled to leave the place in consequence of the want of such accommodation, it has been decided to erect suitable BATHS in Filey, and for this purpose a Company has been formed and registered under the “Joint Stock Companies’ Limited Liability Acts.”

The Building, which is now in the course of erection, upon a most eligible site on the Undercliff, contains Hot, Cold, Shower and Vapour BATHS; a SALOON and READING ROOM, and a suitable Dwelling for the Manager, and will, it is expected, be completed in the month of July next.

Nearly two-thirds of the shares have already been taken, and Forms of Application for the remainder may be had on application to

Mr. DAVISON PHILLISKIRK

Filey, June, 1861; Secretary, Filey

N.B. Bathing Machines in connection with the above establishment.

This building became an important focus of resort and all year round town social life and is currently nearing the completion of refurbishment as luxury apartments. I wonder how much Ackworth House cost to build 157 years ago.

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Photographed this morning.

Harrison worked variously as a painter, plumber, glazier and decorator, employing five or six workers (“men and boys”).

Both brothers were ardent Wesleyans and trustees when the foundation stones were laid for the “new gothic chapel” in May 1876. Davison had made a substantial contribution to the cost of the building but was too ill to attend the ceremony and died about five weeks later.

Harrison lived on for another thirteen years and when his turn came he was laid to rest next to his brother.

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Photographed this morning.

There is a less tangible memorial to the esteem in which Harrison was held. Linen draper and Filey Postmaster William STORY gave two of his children the middle name Philliskirk. Ann died in infancy but George would cross the Atlantic and make it into the Canadian Dictionary of National Biography. His short life in the service of God is considered on Faded Genes.

There is work still to be done on the Shared Tree but you can find the three Philliskirk brothers here. There are photographs of George Philliskirk Story and his wife here.

T. and Maria

When he signed the marriage register at St Oswald’s in 1860, Maria WATKINSON’s husband signed his name “Thomas COULTAS”. Until death parted them, the couple supplied census information five times, and on each occasion, the enumerator inscribed “Thomas” in his book.

In 1881 there were just three at home in Church Street; in 1891 five in Chapel Street – the parents and three unmarried offspring aged 24 to 29.

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2 Mitford Street this afternoon

By 1901 Thomas and Maria had moved to No.2 Mitford Street and on census night they had a house full. George, resolutely single at 38, was still under the parental roof and daughter Jane, now Mrs POSTILL, was there with infant Annie, 1. The wife of their son Thomas, Sarah Jane SELLERS was visiting (or maybe resident) with two of her children, George, 9, and Maria, 3.

Six months later, Grandma Maria was a widow. The Registrar entered her husband’s name as “John Thomas” and on the gravestone in St Oswald’s churchyard he is “John T. Coultas”.

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This monument is next to the stone remembering Maria’s parents and sister Jane. Elsewhere there are graves for a younger John Thomas and two Thomases, and several more remembering husbands of Coultas and Watkinson women. There’s a lot of work to be done! I did some merging of duplicates this morning, so these families are beginning to take shape on the Shared Tree.

Not So Plain, Jane

I noticed a detail in one source this morning that put a question mark against yesterday’s narrative that Jane WATKINSON married two WYVILL brothers.

On their entry in the St Mary, Hull, marriage register Crompton is correctly identified as a widower, and his bride as a widow but, against convention, Jane gives her maiden name WATKINSON, rather than her first married name – WYVILL. The register, alarmingly, states that her father is William COULTAS, Labourer (deceased).

The register entry for Jane’s first marriage to James Wyvill gives her father as William WATKINSON and helpfully adds the detail that he is “Sexton to Filey Parish Church”. This fits perfectly with Jane’s memorial on her father’s headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM WATKINSON, for 32 years Sexton of this parish,

died 20th March 1884, aged 76 years.

‘A door keeper in the House of my God’

Also MARY wife of the above who died 13th April 1897 aged 84 years

‘Thy will be done’

Also JANE WYVILL their daughter died March 19 1930 aged 79

‘Her end was peace’

This Jane may be a second iteration – there’s a birth registration in 1848 for a Jane who may have arrived earlier. I haven’t, though, found a death record, or the birth of a second Jane in 1850 or 1851. However, there is a christening source for March 1851, and that year’s census return gives Jane’s age as “1 mo”.

In 1871 there is a census entry in Mosey’s Yard for Jane, first husband James Wyvill and their first child William, also one month old. (The little chap wouldn’t see the year out.) Nearby in Queen Street, James is recorded again with his wife Elizabeth and three children. This isn’t a transcription error – “James” is clearly written – but the children belong to Crompton Wyvill and his first wife Elizabeth Jane FELL.

Support for Jane marrying Crompton after the deaths of her James and his Elizabeth Jane is found in the 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses. As close families would, Crompton and Jane accepted the children from those first marriages as their own, and no attempt is made by the census enumerator to indicate the mix of biological parents. On census night 1911, Jane, a widow aged 60 and working as a laundress, is with her “grandson”, 11-year-old Frank Cappleman Wheeler WYVILL. The boy’s grandmother is, of course, Elizabeth Jane Fell. Jane confirms that she had given birth to just three children, of whom one had died. That would have been William.

I can’t explain the naming of William Coultas in the Hull marriage register, mentioned above. Jane’s eldest sister Maria had married a Thomas COULTAS and the couple gave some of their children names that are found in other Watkinson families. (Example – John Clark COULTAS and John Clark WATKINSON.)  Maybe the clerk at St Mary’s had a senior moment.

Jane, Elizabeth Jane and the two Wyvill brothers don’t yet appear as they should on the Shared Tree. For now, you may have to go into the Details screens to see everyone I’ve mentioned. (Maria isn’t represented yet.)

Rachel’s Sister

Elizabeth Jane FELL was five years younger than Rachel (Saturday’s post) but, like her big sister, she married at age 24. She had six children with Crompton “Crump” WYVILL and four reached adulthood and married. One little girl died almost immediately on arrival, the other stayed for just over two years. They were both called Rachel.

Elizabeth didn’t make old bones.

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In loving memory of CROMPTON WYVILL, late Coxswain of the Filey Lifeboat, the beloved husband of JANE WYVILL, born August 28th 1843, died August 21st 1904.

‘His end was peace’

Also ELIZABETH JANE, wife of the above, born Oct 18th 1840, died May 1st 1879.

‘She sleeps in Jesus’

Also JAMES WYVILL, the beloved husband of JANE WYVILL of Filey, who was drowned from the yawl ‘Eliza’ during the severe gale on the 28th – 29th Oct 1880, aged 32 years.

‘Thy will be done’

Jane WATKINSON was 22 years old when she married had three children, all boys, before James was lost in a storm while fishing. After four years as a widow, she married James’ older brother, “Crump”. She was only 36 years old but the second marriage for them both appears to have been childless. After twenty years, Jane found herself a widow again.

[Mr. Crompton Wyville]. Who was approaching the allotted span of life, died on Sunday in a sudden manner. He went out for a walk on Sunday afternoon on the Crescent and met several friends. On returning home he was taken ill, breathed heavily, and died in a few minutes. Deceased having been medically attended, there was no necessity for an inquest, and although the end was not altogether unexpected, Mrs Wyville and family have received many expressions of condolence in the bereavement. During the time deceased was coxswain of the Filey lifeboat, several good services were rendered by the crew, and Crompton Wyville was known as a brave and fearless man. When he retired from the position about ten years ago, the Lifeboat Institution showed their appreciation of his services by presenting him with an illuminated address of thanks. His interest in the institution continued to the end, up to the time of his death he acted as collector at Filey. The Rev. A. N. Cooper, vicar, conducted the last rites.

Driffield Times 27 August 1904

Jane was 81-years-old when she died in 1930.

Find Elizabeth Jane, Jane and the Wyvill brothers on the Shared Tree.

On the Fells

As a family name, FELL may have evolved from the European landscape or from an occupation. A fellmonger prepared skins for tanners and curriers. Yorkshire has its share of Fells, though you would think the largest English county a desert if you put your faith in Ancestry’s 1891 census distribution.

There is a cluster of these folk in Flamborough, and a few in Filey but the 1881 Census shows them scattered about all three Ridings and in Lincolnshire. (Kath has around a hundred Fells in her Filey Genealogy & Connections database and they rank equal 66th in the frequency chart (with DOBSON and TEMPLE). A quick glance shows John to be the most common name for boys, and Mary for girls.

There are two Rachels, and both were daughters of John FELL and Mary CAMMISH. The first Rachel was born about a year after her parents married in 1830 but she didn’t live to a second birthday. The next child, their only son Richard, lived for only six months.

Two years later Rachel the Second arrived and she not only married but had nine children with fisherman Thomas JENKINSON. Thomas just made it to his sixties; Rachel died aged 63.

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Thy will be done

In loving memory of THOMAS JENKINSON, the beloved husband of RACHEL JENKINSON, who died May 11th1895, aged 60 years.

The voyage of life is at an end

The mortal affliction is past

The age that in Heaven they spend

For ever and ever shall last.

Also RACHEL, wife of the above, who died Oct. 1st 1899, aged 63 years.

Thy will be done

Find Rachel on FamilySearch Tree.

PC Harvey and the Fisher Lads

In the summer of 1870, five Filey fisher lads were in court, charged with obstructing a footpath on the Crescent “by walking abreast and jostling each other”.

P.C. D. Harvey, stationed at Filey, said that on the 19th [of June], about 8 p.m., he was on duty there, on the Crescent. His attention was drawn to the defendants, all standing on the footpath and larking. He crossed over the road to speak to them, but on seeing him they made off. He followed them, and told them if they continued this practice, he would have to report them.

On that same evening, Police-sergeant Hanswell, in plain-clothes, saw the defendants, walking four or five abreast…

…and taking up nearly the whole of the pathway, which is 9 or 10 feet wide. They repeatedly jostled each other when persons were coming, so as to force them off this pathway. He watched them for about half an hour…and saw several people had to turn off. For some time this practice had been going on and many complaints made.

The defendants were found guilty and offered a choice of paying the court 6s 6d or going to prison for 7 days.

Three other Filey fisher lads were offered the same choice for a similar offence.

The miscreants were Thomas Robinson, George Arvery, Abraham Sanderson, William Waller, Matthew Cammish, Benjamin Watson, William Scotter and Alfred Lowley.

I traced most of them were quickly in Filey Genealogy & Connections, aged between 16 and 18. Four or five years later, several were married and fathers. The sea may have given them a living but it also took away. Abraham Sanderson was baptized on 15 October 1854 and his father was drowned three days later. William Waller was eight when his father may have suffered a similar fate. If Matthew Cammish was Matthew Jenkinson Cammish (born 1854), he would mourn the loss at sea of four uncles. William Scotter was not Filey-born. One of his sons would be killed in the First World War, aged 29.

I imagine the jostling fisher lads were slightly older versions of this bunch, posing against the lifeboat house doors.

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Photographer unknown, no date, courtesy Martin Douglas.

Daniel HARVEY was caught in Filey by the census enumerator the following year, living in Church Street near the vicarage. Both he and his wife, Mary Jane, were Gloucestershire born and bred but spent most of their adult lives in Yorkshire. They had eight children and by 1871 had buried two of them; Marmaduke at about the time the fisher lads were misbehaving. Of the five young ones in Church Street, three would reach a good age.

At age six, Daniel was a “cloth worker” in Minchinhampton and at 26 a pawnbroker. Entering the police force was good for him. In 1881 he was a sergeant in Gate Fulford, York and ten years later a Superintendent, living “above the shop”  in Welton near Hull.

Daniel died in 1899. I was initially surprised that this Harvey family was not represented at all on the FamilySearch Tree. The only son to make it to adulthood had ended up as headmaster of a school in Cumberland, where his wife was the assistant head. But they had no children of her own. Annie Eliza Harvey did not marry and Lilian’s marriage didn’t last long – husband Walter JACKLIN died at 43. So there are no known descendants of Daniel and Mary Jane to share memories with us.

I found a way to remember them through Wallace Dean’s wife, Sarah Elizabeth GREENWOOD. I’ll add some more of their people over the next few days.

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The Crescent, this afternoon