The Rudston Mausoleum

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For too long the Mausoleum was a storage place for old lawnmowers and bits of plywood and timber. I was pleased this morning to see that an attempt has been made to clear it of rubbish. Maybe soon the structure will be afforded the full respect it deserves. There was some talk a while back of seeking a mason who might repair the stonework, perhaps even restore the structure to its original state. The cost would be enormous.

The shield-shaped plaque above the west windows bears an inscription that explains the building’s purpose.

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This monument was erected by the eldest son in honour of his father and mother.

Is also testimony of affection for his 8 brothers and sisters  and for other members whose names are inscribed within.

One of those named is William John –

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I searched under the assumption that he was a RUDSTON and failed to find him or any of his 8 siblings. This is really The BROWN Mausoleum.

But the Rudston name has great cachet in East Yorkshire, though quite where William John’s mother, Emily Rudston, fits into a long and complicated pedigree has yet to be discovered – by me at least.

Emily married the Reverend John Henry BROWN at All Saints Church, Sculcoates, in June 1838. Their first two children were born in Hull, the next two in Liverpool, two more in East Retford and the last three in Brewood, (pronounced Brood), Staffordshire. I don’t know how many are sleeping beneath the tiled floor. Kath has a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections for Harry COWLING (1920 – 2005), “an absolutely lovely man”.

He was a choirboy and had to go down to the Rudston Memorial – right down.  The steps to the mausoleum were not immediately outside the memorial, they were a bit further down the path so he and Jimmy Brown – as choirboys – had to go down with the funeral party. He told me that they were scared stiff.

It seems likely that the Rudston family name comes from the monolith that gave an East Yorkshire village its name. Eight hundred years ago there may have been a connection to the influential de GANT dynasty but they seem to have established themselves for generations at Hayton, near Pocklington. The pedigree is difficult to trace with certainty, in part because of a three-way split into Rudston, Calverley Rudston, and Rudston-Read. Andrew Rose has generously placed his fascinating narrative of The Rudstons of Hayton and Allerthorpe on the Pocklington History website.

You can find John Henry BROWN on the FamilySearch Tree but his wife Emily’s link to the Hayton Rudstons, if there is one, is not clear. I haven’t had time yet to check through all of Kath’s Rudstons and Rudston-Reads on Filey Genealogy & ConnectionsThere may be some answers in plain view there.

Feeling the Heat

Radio 5 Live’s Breakfast News majored on The Great Distraction this morning – the Premier League season kicks off this evening – but earlier this week I was shocked to hear Climate Change mentioned. What? Hothouse Earth, 200 feet of sea-level rise, some parts of the globe uninhabitable? Auntie rarely touches this subject and I wondered if these predictions were Project Fear offerings,

But no, it was just a 20-second piece triggered by a new scientific paper released by Stockholm Resilience. (A PDF can be freely downloaded.)

It took about 70 years for a Frenchman, an Irishman, and a Swede to explain that it would be no joke to pump unnatural amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Joseph FOURIER “discovered” the greenhouse effect in 1824, John TYNDALL carried out experiments beginning in 1858 and Svante Arrhenius supplied quantitative data in 1896.

The path to Hell on Earth is clear now. It just requires humankind to do a collective about turn. Homo sapiens appears, though, to have a death wish.

1850_TYNDALLjohn2_PnkPDJohn TYNDALL looks rather slight in this portrait, made about 1853 by an unknown photographer (and in the public domain). He was, however, a strong, adventurous young man, known as much for mountaineering exploits as his scientific achievements. He didn’t marry until he was 55 years old. His wife, Louisa Charlotte HAMILTON was just thirty but the couple doesn’t appear to have produced children. John endured ill health as he entered his seventies and in early December 1893, Louisa made a mistake when giving him his night-time medication. He remarked upon the sweet taste of the sulfate of magnesia he was expecting and Louisa realized she had instead given him chloral. When she told him he said, “My poor darling, you have killed your John.” At the inquest, a verdict of accidental death was recorded and much sympathy afforded to Louisa.

John died at Hindhead House in Surrey and there is a photograph of his grave in the Francis Frith Collection. His name and achievements are more grandly represented in The Tyndall Centre in Manchester where, among the many scientists and engineers investigating climate change and global warming there are two of my favorite “explainers”, Kevin ANDERSON and Alice BOWS-LARKIN.

John Tyndall came from a humble background and this is reflected in the brevity of his male line on FamilySearch Tree. (One source claims a connection to William TYNDALE of Bible fame.) Louisa was from “the upper crust” and amongst her noble forebears, you will see a  number of the BOWES family going back to William (1389-1465).

Lunatics at Large

On the 7th August 1880, the unfortunate George MARTIN appeared before the Bridlington Petty Sessions. This insignificant event passed me by on Tuesday so I made a note to update the story next year. This morning the Radio Five Live breakfast news informed me that “America” was intending to impose more sanctions on Russia for poisoning the Skripals. And yesterday several social media companies in the vicinity of San Francisco wiped Alex Jones’ Info Wars from their platforms. News of other hideous events appeared during the day. They all seemed to be connected.

I wrote a brief post about poor George in Looking at Filey a few years ago. Here is the syndicated news report that also appeared in The Scarborough Mercury.

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I added the following comment:-

The only likely young George MARTIN I could find was George J., aged 20 in 1881, a jet worker living with his widowed aunt at Pier, Whitby (RG114834 f95). I hope this was the wanderer because the record suggests he had three things going for him – a roof over his head, a wage coming in and family to care for him – enough to keep the demons at bay, perhaps. I wonder what became of him.

With access to more sources, I looked again and found evidence to support my hunch. Two months earlier a Whitby jet worker of the same name had appeared before a Scarborough court.

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I think there is just enough here to proceed on the assumption that these disturbed Georges are one and the same – and that he was with his Aunt in Whitby when the census enumerator came to call the following year.

I did some more detective work but failed to discover what became of George. I found out, though, that tragedy attended his birth. He was just a few days old, at most a month or so, when a terrific storm hit the northeast coast of England. Many vessels were driven on shore and wrecked. A lot of sailors lost their lives. The Whitby lifeboat went out at least five times and rescued a number of men before a particularly nasty combination of waves, rebounding from the stricken vessel Merchant of Maldon, turned the lifeboat over. Only one of the crew survived. Of the twelve that drowned…

Six of the bodies, viz., Isaac Dobson, Matthew Laidley, Wm. Walker, Wm, Storr, Wm. Tyneman, and George Martin, were recovered on the same day. The majority of these twelve men had saved the crews of five vessels that day; and these brave fellows, especially the Storrs and the Laidleys, had on many occasions within the last twenty years heroically and devotedly risked their lives for the preservation of others; and it mattered not how tempestuous the storm, or how heavy the sea, if they saw their fellow creatures in imminent danger, they would make intrepid and strenuous exertions to save them.

This Yorkshire Gazette account of 16 February notes those left behind included “Geo. Martin, aged 25, wife and infant”, and says, “It may also be remarked that George Martin’s brother and Christopher Collins’s brother were drowned by the upsetting of a coble on February 4th, 1842.”

When the 1861 Census was taken a few weeks later, on the 7th of April, infant George James was with his mother Jane at the home in Cragg, Whitby, of her older sister Ann, and husband Mark WINN. Ten years later Jane and George were enumerated at Pier, Whitby. And, as noted earlier, in 1881 widow Ann Winn, aged 60, is recorded at Pier with George James and niece Ellen NORTON, aged 12. Sources indicate that Jane had remarried and was living nearby, at Cragg, with husband William LEWIS and 24-year-old stepson, Henry – a police constable! (You couldn’t make it up.)

The WILTON girls, Ann and Jane, can be found on FamilySearch Tree, and Mark WINN too, but they are as yet “unconnected”. I couldn’t find the Georges Martin but they may be on the World Tree somewhere.

The bravery of those Whitby fishermen and sailors, who risked their lives to save others, is in marked contrast to the behavior of “men” nowadays. A couple of news reports today say a Saudi led airstrike on Yemen has killed fifty people, most of them children in a school bus, and a report just released tells us that monks and teachers at Ampleforth and Downside schools have been sexually abusing children for over 40 years.

It seems unlikely that America will impose sanctions on the Saudis for slaughtering innocents. Perhaps it will be argued that International Law hasn’t been broken.

Unless I have missed something, there has been no evidence presented yet to prove that Russia tried to kill the Skripals with Novichok. The regimes in the United States, UK, some EU countries, Arab States, Israel – lunatics all and, terrifyingly, at large. (Many of their misdeeds are, of course, not reported at all.)

The Widow Precious

Elizabeth BEAN was born in Newland, near Drax, in 1817. She married John PRECIOUS, of Selby, in February 1841 and, as far as I have been able to determine, bore him just one child, Annie. The girl died in March 1856, just thirteen years old. Five years earlier, the census caught the small family visiting farmer Timothy KNOWLES and wife Sarah in East Retford, Nottinghamshire. John, described as a Spirit Merchant in 1841, was now an “Independent Gentleman”. Five years after the death of his only child, he was a schoolmaster, enumerated at the school in Hensall, near Pontefract.

In the early 1860s, something happened to turn John from a pedagogue to someone who supplied footwear to Filey folk. In October 1865, one of his workmen at the “shoe warehouse” in John Street stole three pairs of shoes. Richard BENTLEY, 40, was taken into custody, charged, found guilty and sentenced to three months in jail. Before he was released, his employer died. The body of John Precious was taken for burial in Selby but his widow stayed in Filey and kept the business going for another fifteen years or so. In 1868 she advertised her wares as follows:-

PRECIOUS, 4,   John  Street,   “Begs  most  respectfully   to  inform   the Inhabitants and Visitors of Filey that a first-class stock of FRENCH and ENGLISH boots and shoes are always on hand, which for beauty, style and elegance cannot be surpassed. A visit to this Emporium of Fashion will be esteemed a favour.”

 

And in March 1878:-

E. PRECIOUS, 4, JOHN STREET, NEW FILEY, keeps a first-class Stock of French and English BOOTS and SHOES, and Berlin and other Fancy Wools, are always on hand, which for Style and Elegance cannot be surpassed.

This morning, the sun shone upon Lilly’s Sandcastle, 4 John Street. (I’m assuming that there hasn’t been a renumbering of the street’s properties.)

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At the 1871 Census, Elizabeth was living here with her “grandson”, George BEAN, aged 14 and described as an “assistant teacher”. He would later get a real job, and in May 1892 drown from the fishing boat Unity.

In 1881 Elizabeth shared 4 John Street with her “granddaughter”, Elizabeth BEAN, age 15 –  the eldest of George’s four sisters.

There is much work still to be done on the BEAN pedigree but, as it stands today, Elizabeth was not related by blood to these young people.

Widow Precious decided to relinquish the John Street business in March 1882. An auction notice in the Scarborough Mercury described some of the house contents:-

BEDROOMS.-Iron and wood Tudor and French bedsteads and hangings, prime feather beds, bolsters and pillows, mattresses, palliasses, blankets, sheets, counterpanes, cane-seated chairs, carpets, washstands, dressing tables, mahogany chests of drawers, and other chamber requisites.

SITTING-ROOM.-Drawing-room suite in green rep (walnut frames), very handsome marble-top walnut chiffoner, plate-glass back and panels; splendid inlaid walnut whatnot, mahogany loo centre table, mantel glass, carpet and hearthrug, fender and fire-irons, pictures, &c.

BACK SITTING-ROOM and KITCHEN, &c.-Couch, arm chair, rocking chairs, tables, kitchen utensils, and all the pots, pans, and other articles too numerous to mention.

Elizabeth moved a short distance to the Crescent and experienced some aggravation. In 1885 she introduced a Mr. Haxby, probably Frederick (1830 – 1910), to Judge BEDWELL at Scarborough County Court. The reporter for the local paper described the case thus:-

PRECIOUS v. HAXBY.-This was an action brought by the plaintiff, Mrs. Elizabeth Precious, The Crescent, Filey to recover damages from the defendant, Mr. Haxby, joiner, of Filey, for damage done to her property which she holds as tenant under a two years lease, granted by Messrs. Rowntree and Sons, of Scarborough, the then owners of the property.-Mr. Richardson, of Bridlington, represented the plaintiff, and Mr. Royle the defendant. It was stated by Mr. Richardson that the property in question was subsequently conveyed to the defendant. The property was situated in the Crescent at Filey, and was rented at £75. The defendant and his men came one day, and in spite of all remonstrances of the plaintiff pulled down a wall, which act, it was alleged, interfered with the privacy of the house. The defendant had several times asked the plaintiff if she would have the wall down, but she, said that on no account would she consent to it-Mr. Royle raised the question of jurisdiction, and the case was ousted, being struck out of the list.

This unhappy experience may have been enough to drive Elizabeth from Filey. In 1891 the enumerator found her in Bilton, just outside Hull, living with her “sister”, Ann, eight years younger and also a widow. Elizabeth defined herself as a “retired lodging housekeeper”. Ann was still working the family farm.

When Ann married James ENGLAND in 1846 she gave her last name as BOULTON, not BEAN. She was only 21 when she married and unlikely to have been a widow. I don’t have the proof yet but I became fairly sure that Ann and Elizabeth were full sisters when I discovered their father was called John Boulton Bean (Source: marriage record for John Precious and Elizabeth). He is represented on the FamilySearch Tree as the illegitimate son of Ann BEAN, a case perhaps of the family accepting the father was a Mr. BOULTON.

Elizabeth didn’t make it to the 1901 census. Thirty-five years of widowhood ended on the farm at Bilton in the September Quarter of 1900.

Duckling Update

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Spot the mother! (The boating lake in Glen Gardens this morning.)

O Pioneers!

My 3rd cousin 5 times removed, Susannah Rebecca TILLET, was born in Norfolk in 1822. Her father, William, didn’t live to see her married to Daniel OSBORNE in 1844; her mother, Susanna, welcomed four of the couple’s seven children into the world – though the first two, twins Richard and Robert, didn’t stay long. The third child, Susannah Rebecca (named after her mother), was four years old when granny Susanna died. Three more Osborne children were born in Norfolk and then, at the age of 31, Daniel decided to take his family to America. They sailed on the good ship Thornton and arrived in New York City early in July 1856, giving their final destination as Utah. Before the end of the month, they set out from Iowa City, traveling with the James G. Willie Company.

A Willie Handcart Survivor plaque continues the story of Susannah Rebecca the Younger.

At the age of  12 years Susannah Rebecca Osborne and family were members of the Willie Handcart Company of 1856. She, her mother and sisters Martha Ann and Sarah Ann were rescued from under the handcart in Echo Canyon, Utah, by John Saline. Soon after their rescue, Susannah Rebecca Tillet Osborne, mother of three little girls,, died and was laid to rest in a meager, snowy grave just hours from Salt Lake City. Her father Daniel Osborne and Daniel Osborne Jr. also died and were buried on the plains. John and Susanna were later married and came to the Gila Valley where they raised ten children. Their numerous descendants are sincerely reverenced and truly humbled by their great faith, noble devotion and everlasting love for the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We are forever amazed, honored and stand in awe of their life story.

MAY GOD BE WITH YOU UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN.

I wouldn’t have known any of this had FamilySearch not sent me an email! Here’s the first sighting of my pioneer cousin.

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O Susannah, I’m not ashamed to say I cried for thee.

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Today’s Image

In June 1841, Church Cliff House was occupied by farmer Richard LOWISH, his wife Mary Ann, and their daughter Ann, with five male agricultural labourers and two female servants living in. In August the following year, Richard sold 35 pure-bred Leicestershire rams by auction and in April 1843 assigned “all his real and personal estate and effects” to three trusted men and sailed for America. In 1850 he was enumerated in Lost Creek, Vigo, with Mary Ann and four children. The youngest of three girls, Emma G. aged 3, had been born in Indiana. You can find them on FamilySearch Tree.

Delville Wood

I haven’t been able to establish exactly when and where Tom CHAPMAN sustained the wounds from which he died, on this day 1916. He was serving in the 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment and the following extract from a snowdenhouse article places him at Longueval four days earlier.

On the 23rd a joint operation by the 3rd and 5th Divisions was put into action. Both Divisions attacked from the west of Longueval with the 3rd Division on the right and the 5th Division on the left. At 3:40 am the 1st Northumberland Fusiliers advanced followed by the 13th Kings and 12th West Yorks. They made good progress advancing through the northern part of Longueval and into Delville Wood itself, until they came up against heavy machine-gun fire from the front and left. They were forced to fall back at first to Piccadilly Street and then to Pont Street. Two other battalions captured a German strong point close to the Orchard in the north of the village but after being heavy counter attacked they were also forced to retire.

“Piccadilly Street” is the road north out of the village, so I think Tom may have fallen in the area circled on the Google Earth satellite image below.

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He was taken to a nearby casualty receiving station and then, perhaps, moved to a hospital where he died.

The Battle for Delville Wood was a bitterly fought affair and South African units particularly suffered enormous casualties. Graham Leslie McCallum writes about his grandfather’s experiences on the Western Front here. Scroll down until you see photographs of Longueval and Delville, which may change the pictures you have in your mind of a French village and wood in summer.

Tom was buried in La Neuville British Cemetery, Corbie, which is about 30 km west of Longueval. He is remembered on a family grave in St Oswald’s; he has the left-hand kerb and older brother Frank the right.

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Memories of FRANK CHAPMAN, died 28 Dec 1926, aged 38.

And TOM CHAPMAN, died of wounds in France, 27 July 1916, aged 20.

Tom is on the FamilySearch Tree.

‘He Opened Africa’s Skyways’

This is the inscription on the headstone of John WILLIAMSON in Cape Town’s Maitland Cemetery. Born Filey in 1895 he must have spent quite a few years in South Africa. Skyways can’t be opened in a hurry, surely.

John was one of the unlucky generation, called upon to fight for the elites in the worst of wars. I haven’t been able to confirm it yet, but I think he served as a motor mechanic in the infant Royal Air Force between 1915 and 1918. There is circumstantial evidence that he migrated to South Africa shortly after the end of the First World War and was serving in the South Africa Air Force when the Second began. His brief service details on the CWGC website reveal that he was known as “John Billie”. Plain “John” when his birth was registered, his father was a John William, a more likely reason for the diminutive, perhaps, than the surname.

I haven’t found a marriage for John in the UK but an online search found a possible daughter in law in the Capetown suburb where he lived with his wife ‘C. M.’ Cato ‘Dinky’ Williamson née LADAN, was the sister of sculptor Eduard Louis LADAN (1918? – 1992). She was one of South Africa’s first female pilots. Eduard served in the SAAF in the Second World War and was rewarded for distinguished services in the King’s Birthday Honours in 1943.

John is remembered on the Filey War Memorial in Murray Street and on a family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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And their dear son, Lt. JOHN WILLIAMSON S.A.A.F., died July 22nd 1942 aged 46, buried at Capetown, S.A.

‘Loved, honoured and remembered.’

The family is represented on the FamilySearch Tree but the pedigree is limited to just five generations of his direct male line.

Today’s Image

The mysterious algal bloom is back on the boating lake. Last evening it covered about three-quarters of the lake surface, a mosaic of slimy green ‘floes’. The wind overnight had pushed these to the eastern end, up against the retaining wall.

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When I photographed today’s star duckling I didn’t notice the lump on its back. I guess compromised nature will have to take its course.