Horse Trading

Graves BULMER, Neighbour 2 a few days ago, led a seemingly quiet existence. His son was rather more lively and I wrote about some of his adventures in Looking at Filey – The Liquidation of James Bulmer.

Today, while trying to sort out the paternity of James’ children for FamilySearch Tree, I happened upon an instance of misbehaviour by one of his sons.

“A Bill to the Whole World”

Singular Horse Dealing at Scarborough

Pony “Warranted Quiet When Sound.”

A singular state of affairs was revealed at Scarborough Court on Monday, when James Bulmer, jun. (35), horse dealer, Filey, was charged with obtaining a pony by false pretences. Mr Nicholl (Deputy Town Clerk) in the course of the proceedings mentioned three instances in which the prisoner had given bills payable to the York City and County Bank in payment of horses, where he had an account. In the case in question the prisoner bought a pony for £7 from Mr. Crawshaw, of Scarborough, in payment for which prisoner handed him a bill, which was stamped, and on it prisoner had written: “Pay to my order the sum of £7 for value received to Mr. Newman Crawshaw, Langdale Road, Scarborough, (Signed) James Bulmer, 36 Queen Street, Filey.”

The Chairman: Is it a promissory note?

Town Clerk: No. It is a bill addressed to the whole world. (Laughter.)

Mr. Crawshaw said he would not have parted with the pony if he had not thought the bill would entitle him to £7 when presented at the bank, which marked the bill as worthless. He gave the prisoner a recept and a warranty. The latter was as follows:- “Warranted quiet to drive and ride when sound.” (Laughter.)

Prisoner was remanded on bail.

Bradford Daily Telegraph 31 January 1899

James senior was almost certainly young James’ father but the lad’s mother was probably Ann TEMPLE and not, as Filey Genealogy & Connections has it, “Mary Ann BULMER”. James junior was born in 1864, eleven years before his father married “Miss Temple” but the most convincing birth registration I have for him is in June Quarter 1864 in Bridlington. His name is given as “James Bulmer TEMPLE”. The mother’s maiden surname is absent, suggesting an illegitimate birth. Ann was 23 years old and at the 1861 census was living with James senior at Moor Farm, Reighton, as his housekeeper.

Ann is on FamilySearch Tree in several guises, waiting to be hitched. Here is one. Poor Newman Crawshaw isn’t on the World Tree yet but his household in 1901 is easily found in Sources.

1901_CRAWSHAWnewman

 

Neighbours · 2

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I’m not sure who Graves BULMER’s parents are, or if he had any siblings. He has a limited representation on FamilySearch Tree.

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At the 1841 census, he was with wife Ann and their three young boys, farming from Moor House, at the edge of the village in the vicinity of Common Right Road. Ten years later his address was given as “the Houses near the Railway Station”, though an 1851 map shows there were hardly any dwellings in that part of Filey at that time. He had left the land to work as a publican and fishmonger. He died before the 1861 census was taken.

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In affectionate remembrance of GRAVES BULMER who died October 11th 1858, aged 52 years.

‘While spirits in the clouds above

Do sing and praise redeeming love

Their bodies in the bed of clay

Wait silent till the joyful day.’

Also JAMES BULMER, son of the above, died Feb 16th 1911, aged 77 years

‘Peace & rest’

Ann, a widow for fifteen years, was buried in St Oswald’s churchyard in 1873, though I don’t know exactly where. The space beneath Graves’ inscription waited another forty years or so before being filled with a remembrance of eldest son James’ passing.

In 1871 Ann was enumerated in Chapel Street North, described as an Innkeeper. In Filey Genealogy & Connections she is listed as a Beer House Keeper. Her domain, The Star, is pictured below about half a century after her death.

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1920, photographer unknown, courtesy Joanne Cammish

Neighbours · 1

WilliamGravesWilliam Munro and Graves Bulmer rest eternally in St Oswald’s churchyard, about a hundred paces from each other. In life, for a short time, they were near neighbours. In October 1834 a notice in a local newspaper gave advanced notice of an Auction of properties in Filey to be held early the following year.

 

Also, two other MESSUAGES or DWELLING-HOUSES, one of them newly erected, and now in the occupation of Mr. Wm Dunn, and the other occupied by Mr. Munro, Surgeon.

Also, a neat STONE COTTAGE, with the Barn and Out-buildings adjoining, in the occupation of Graves Bulmer. Also the BATH-HOUSE, fitted up with Hot and Cold Baths, and a piece of Building Ground in the Town Street.

A note in William’s record in Filey Genealogy &Connections states:-

1823:  a warm bath may be procured by applying at the house of Mr Munro, surgeon, who is possessed of a portable one, manufactured out of tin on an improved construction, which can be either lent out, or persons may be accommodated with it at Mr M’s house.

(The date “1823” must be treated with suspicion. A 17-year-old surgeon?)

At the 1841 Census, four Munro men were living in Main Street, Filey. William is first named, age 35, occupation Surgeon. Donald, 65, is a Grocer; John, 20, a Confectioner; Donald, 25, an Engineer. Also enumerated are a Surgeon’s Assistant, two female servants and a boy, 10, also a servant. William’s wife, Agnes, had died the previous year but his mother (and the elder Donald’s wife) was still living but enumerated elsewhere.

In 1851, Donald senior is living alone in Murray Street, Filey, age given as 74 and described as a widower and “Out Pensioner of Chelsea and Bath Keeper”. I don’t know what happened to the younger Donald or John, but the deaths of William, his mother, and wife are recorded on this headstone.

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Erected to the memory of WILLIAM MUNRO, Late Surgeon at this place, who departed this life on 27th July 1841, aged 36 years.

Also of [blank] his Wife, who departed this life on the 25th Dec. 1840, aged 40 years.

Also of JANET, Wife of Donald Munro and Mother of the above, who died the 22nd December 1843.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society’s transcription gives the name of William’s wife as “—ES” but the first three letters of Agnes can, just about, be recognized. The GRO Death Index entry offers confirmation.

Name: Age at Death (in years): 
MUNRO, AGNES 41
GRO Reference: 1840  D Quarter in SCARBROUGH  Volume 24  Page 306

William’s father died in the June quarter of 1861, probably in Filey because his death was registered in Scarborough District, but I can’t find him in the census, taken that year on 7 April.

I’ve mentioned the Munro ethnicity – and don’t have the slightest idea what brought the family to Filey. I turned to FamilySearch, hoping to find William’s origins. I searched for him in Scotland with a birth year between 1804 and 1806 and 15 Williams of that ilk were returned. Only one had a mother called Janet.

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I checked the christening source.

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“Daniel” is a caution. But wait!

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1843_MUNROjanet_BURIAL

And on Find My Past there is a transcription from Scottish Marriages 1561 – 1910 recording the union of Donald MUNRO and Janet SHEPHERD at Canongate, Edinburgh, 28 May 1803. These pieces of evidence suggest that “Daniel” on the christening record is a transcription error.

I haven’t found a cause of William’s early death but he clearly made an impression on the people of the area. On 11 March 1878, under the challenging title Monuments of Negligence at Filey, a gentleman began his letter to the editor of The Scarborough Mercury thus:-

Sir,-Through seeing in your paper for some weeks past sundry notices relative to the ancient town of Filey, I was induced to visit the place, and would fain call back to memory the names of men such as Dr. Munro, Dr. Cortis, Mr. Suggitt, and many others who were ever alive to the necessity of enhancing the interests of this romantic spot, and by them a spirit of enterprise was manifested in attending to the wants of a growing population.

‘Sinus Salutaris’

Tomorrow I’ll tell what I know about Neighbour BULMER.

 

James at Rest

The grave of James Jackson SMITH (Saturday’s post) is just to the right of the surprisingly leafy tree that hides the east window of the church in Today’s Image. I have added some more information and sources to his pedigree on FamilySearch Tree and penned a rudimentary Life Sketch. I failed to find him in a couple of censuses and the sketch attempts to make a case for his two marriages.  His first marriage, to Elizabeth Harriet CULPIN, gives his two sons a much longer branch than any of his own thus far – to John Culpin (1565 – 1593), a Yorkshireman.

Apropos my little canary…

Beyond the current heatwave, the overall warming trend has disrupted snakes’ breeding cycles, meaning there could potentially be more snakes, acting more aggressively, because they were charged up by the heat.

“So the likelihood of a venomous snake coming into a dwelling to escape the heat is probably a lot more than it used to be,” Mr Modra said.

University of Queensland snake expert Professor Bryan Fry agrees, saying snakes are the “scaly canaries in the coal mine” warning of deeper problems in the ecosystem.

“Snake encounters will go up with this extreme weather as snakes are trying to escape the heat,” Professor Fry said.

Source: Climate Change in Australia (second article from TVNZ), Seemorerocks

A Dangerous Dog

The name of the animal is long forgotten but the owners will forever be known as Filey’s most illustrious residents. In August 1901 Dame Madge Kendal and her husband were away, treading the boards when their pet decided to play with matches. The Scarborough Evening News told the story.

A fire broke out on Sunday night [25th] at The Lodge on The Crescent, Filey, occupied by Mr and Mrs Kendal. A visitor was walking in the Crescent Gardens about seven in the evening, and observed flames issuing from one of the bedroom windows of a house at the far end of The Crescent, known as South Crescent Lodge. He immediately gave the alarm. The only occupants of the house were Miss Margery Kendal and the servants, Mr and Mrs Kendal being in town fulfilling a theatrical engagement. A good supply of water was easily procurable, and the flames were extinguished before the arrival of the local fire brigade. On an examination of the room by Sergeant Smith and a constable, who were on the scene immediately after the outbreak, it was found that a dog had been playing with a box of matches in the bedroom and had caused them to become ignited. The mattress and bedding were burnt, and the carpets, dressing table, and some books were scorched. The damage is estimated at about £10. A strong wind was blowing at the time, but the prompt action of the servants and police prevented the flames from spreading to other parts of the extensive and valuable premises.

A few months earlier the caretakers were the only occupants of the villa. Their names are given as James Jackson SMITH born Flintham, and Mary Jane Jackson SMITH born White Notley, both aged 50. James has a substantial headstone in the churchyard, all to himself, and its inscription reveals him to be a few years older than his census entry suggests.

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In loving memory of JAMES JACKSON SMITH who fell asleep Dec 9 1916, aged 74 years.

‘The Lord is my Shepherd’

James’ wife may have been older too, and her middle name was Ann, not Jane. If I seem uncertain it is because a Flintham/White Notley couple must have married in 1870 because at the 1891 Census they were enumerated in Northfleet, Kent with a son, Edward Jackson SMITH, 21. Father was working as a Foreman on the railway, the son as a tramway conductor. Disconcertingly, Mary Ann THOMPSON had married a plain James in 1870, and a Mary Ann NEWMAN married James Jackson SMITH in Chelsea in 1889. FamilySearch Tree has Miss Newman (MFVP-FBP), born 1850 in White Notley, with her parents John and Jane but as yet unmarried. Trouble ahead.

The “famous” people in this post are also problematic on FamilySearch Tree. Find them here, with just one of their children. I expect they may put in better performances elsewhere on the World Tree but, sigh, that just means a deal of merging has to be done. I hope there will be more instances of light relief, though. Today I was surprised to find that  William Hunter Grimston’s occupation is given as “Comedian” in the marriage register – the same line of work as Margaret Shafto ROBERTSON’s father. (Search online for Dame Madge KENDAL for lots of photographs. Check out Old White Lodge for some fascinating inside stories.)

A man, in disguise, who attended one of Dame Madge’s theatrical performances has a somewhat more substantial pedigree on FST.

South Crescent Villa is now The White Lodge Hotel.

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(Today’s Image of Filey Bay and Muston Sands was taken from the corner of Glen Gardens, a stone’s throw from The White Lodge.)

A Net Loss

The yawl Admiral Hope was built in Scarborough in 1859 by Robert SKELTON. Registered as SH79, her owners are listed in Captain Syd’s database as John SETTERINGTON and Newman ELDERS, farmers from Hunmanby and Filey. The only skipper named is Castle JENKINSON.

In 1867, while fishing for herring in the North Sea, Admiral Hope’s nets were cut by a passing ship and the loss, in today’s money, amounted to about £25,000.

1867_JENKINSONcastleNETS_NEWS

Admiral Hope was broken up in December 1880 and this may have prompted Castle to give the sea shortly afterwards. The census enumerator stated his occupation as “Fisherman” on 3 April 1881 but about three weeks later Castle stood before the magistrates at Bridlington Petty Sessions as a grocer, “charged with having a pair of small scales quarter of an ounce short”. He was fined 5 shillings plus 7 shillings costs, about £56 today. He died 10 months later, aged 59. His wife Mary followed him to the grave a year later. I put a photograph of their headstone on FamilySearch Tree today.

He Lived in a Pigsty

While searching for stories about Robert CAMMISH, owner of the yawl Jane Elizabeth I found this affecting snippet: –

1877_COLEMANjamesh_NEWS

Poor lad.

The COLEMAN family presented themselves neatly in the Filey censuses of 1861 and 1871. The seemingly horrible father hailed from Suffolk and the mother from Scotland. They married in Beverley, about 25 miles or so from Filey. All seven of their children were born in Filey, in Chapel Street or on Scarborough Road. On John’s agricultural labourer’s wages, life must have been a struggle. It isn’t really a surprise that everything fell apart when the mother, Jane, died the June quarter of 1876, aged 42. And a month after James’ court appearance, his older sister Caroline died at just twenty. Their father must have been in despair.

The family fragmented. When the census was taken in 1881, Thomas, 22, was working as a general labourer in Whitby; Isaac, 16, was living in Reighton; the younger sister, Esther, was lodging in Silver Head Street, Scarborough. The undersized boy who had lived with pigs, now 15, was apprenticed in Bridlington to blacksmith Charles DOOKS. I wonder how much bigger and stronger he’d grown! About six weeks before the census was taken, James was in court again, but I’m happy to report it was a case of a biter bit.

1881_COLEMANjshMaulson_NEWS

Five shillings then equates to about £25 now.

This is the last bit of information I’ve found concerning James. Unable to find a marriage or death registration for him makes me think that he may have emigrated. But his name surfaces in the Coleman family in 1897 when Isaac named the second child he has with Ada JACKSON after his little brother. After a spell in the army, with the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, Isaac married in 1894, was a “steelworker” in 1901 and a “general worker labourer” in 1911.

Isaac’s father, John, was at the wedding and “made his mark” in the parish register as a witness. Curiously, the mother’s maiden name on James Harris the Younger’s civil registration is CUSTANCE. I can’t explain this. The mother of Isaac’s other children is, as expected, JACKSON – except for a second John William, whose mother is also given as CUSTANCE. On the 1911 census form, John states that he and Ada had produced nine children in their 17 years of marriage, of whom two had died. These figures tally with the GRO Index of Births (and Deaths) – if the Custance children are included.

The Filey Colemans are present and correct in Filey Genealogy & Connections but were scattered about on the FamilySearch Tree. I made an effort today to bring them together. I have held back from connecting the father, John Harris COLEMAN, to his forebears because he is currently absent from the list of children born to Jeremiah and Sarah née HARRIS. There isn’t much doubt that he belongs there but I’m hoping “family” will check the records and add the Filey branch to the world tree.