Too Many Cooks

On the 22nd October 1915, the Scarborough Mercury reported that Percy COOK, confectioner of West Avenue, Filey,  had been fined 10 shillings at the Police Court for “not having had lights properly shaded”. (I guess the authorities were afraid of Zeppelin raids and needed to set an example.)

Life was sweets for Percy and his occupation should have earned him the respect of the town’s children. It seems to have done the opposite. A few years ago Martin Douglas told me of a nasty rhyme that urchins would hurl at Percy. (Martin heard it from his mother.) They would enter his shop, chant the verse and make a quick exit, pursued by Percy.

Percy Cook said come and have a look

At my old chocolate shop,

The scales are rusty,

The chocolates are fusty,

And you’ve gone off yer nut.

(Not the best advertisement for British education if the last line referred to Percy’s mental state.)

Percy died in 1944, almost twenty years after his wife Mary Jane née MOODY. The couple married late, aged 33 and 40 respectively, and did not have little angels of their own.

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In loving memory of MARY, beloved wife of PERCY COOK, entered into rest Sep. 27th 1925, aged 57.

Go thou improve the present hour,

Be thankful for the past,

And let thy future movement tend

To calm and soothe the last.

Also of the above PERCY COOK, died June 10th 1944, aged 71.

On Filey Genealogy & Connections Percy stands alone. He was one of at least eight children born to John Frederick Cook, a cashier and bookkeeper, and Catherine JOHNSON. At the 1911 Census, remarkably, six of the siblings were living together at 1 St Paul’s Road in Bradford. All were unmarried. Ten years earlier, widowed Catherine ruled a roost of seven children, one of them Percy, at Cliff Bridge Place, Scarborough. He was the only one to fly the nest during the next decade.

So, why too many Cooks, given this generation’s unwillingness to submit to the genetic imperative? Well, an hour or two of sleuthing, brings in 15 MOODYs, who connect with several Filey fishing families (BAYES, COWLING, SCALES). FG &C has these folk but to check them all out on FamilySearch Tree and add the West Riding COOKs is a daunting task.

I noticed in passing one source that elaborated on the Bradford address, labeling it “Manningham Hall”. This seemed rather grand and I wondered if our humble confectioner had been something of a black sheep. In 1901 his sister Evelin (various spellings) was pursuing the same trade but ten years later told the census enumerator that she was a lodging house keeper.  A younger brother headed the St Paul’s household in 1911 and the Find My Past transcription gives his occupation as a “Trains Merchant”. Inspection of the page image reveals he dealt in pianos, as did brother Vernon William Alexander. A noble occupation, romantic even, but the world was changing and in 1939 Sydney had to file for bankruptcy.

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I looked again for a foothold on FamilySearch Tree and found Mary Jane MOODY Cook’s mother, Ann KNAGGS. Someone to build on…another day, perhaps.

A few words about Today’s Image. The concrete jumble below Flat Cliffs/Primrose Valley Holiday Park is the remains of a short promenade that was, I think, still functional in the 1950s. I have seen an old postcard showing an ice cream van parked on it. I haven’t discovered the purpose of the concrete “rings” yet. Someone must know.

The Baltic Connection

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This is one of my favourite stones, with its dove flying from clouds on rays of light. And yet… It tells just a little of the sad story of this WILLIAMSON family. The inscription notes the father’s death in 1810 at 57, a reasonable “innings” in those days. But his youngest son died at 12 and the third of four children, John, drowned in the Baltic Sea, aged 19, in 1808.  Firstborn William drowned 10 years later, closer to home in South Bay, Scarborough. One of his sons would drown in Filey Bay in 1858, aged 50.

The only daughter of Francis and Ann CAMMISH, married “awd Marky” BAXTER and they brought six children into the world. She died aged 49 and Mark lived on for thirty more years.

But back to John. Filey Genealogy & Connections says he was a fisherman but the Baltic, as far as I’m aware, is beyond the normal range for a yawl, let alone a Filey coble. The war with France had a way to go and I’m wondering if John was pressed into the Royal Navy.

Last month I wrote about the Battle of Flamborough Head, which ended with Captain Pearson surrendering ignominiously to John Paul Jones,  but successfully ensuring the safety of the Baltic convoy under his protection. Roll on twenty years and the Royal Navy is in the Baltic Sea safeguarding its trade routes, thwarting Napoleon’s efforts to cut Britain off from the continent.

If you are not convinced by this scenario, I offer you another Filey fisherman, George Whiteley BOYNTON, who was given the byname “Baltic”. As a teenager, he sailed that sea when it was a theatre of the Crimean War.

I haven’t found “Baltic” on FamilySearch Tree but his parents are there, and his wife, Ann SAYERS.

This WILLIAMSON male line on Filey Genealogy & Connections ends with a grandfather going back in time but brother William leads the way to the mid-twentieth century. (William was baptized in 1779, four days before the Baltic fleet dodged Bonhomme Richard’s cannonballs.) The pedigree is not yet as extensive on FamilySearch Tree.

Bethalina

Bethalina CHAPMAN’s first husband, George COWLING, died 163 years ago today at the age of 26. While long-line fishing, he drowned “off Filey” – possibly somewhere in the watery expanse captured by Today’s Image.

Bethalina’s second husband, Thomas FREEMAN, died 142 years ago yesterday, aged 47. In 1861 he was working as a labourer but had turned to fishing ten years later.

Bethalina made it to age sixty. She had one child with George and three with Thomas – and at least 17 grandchildren.

I wrote a short post about girls’ names in Looking at Filey that featured Bethalina (aka Bothalina, Bothia, Bythia, Bithynia).  I also gave her a page on the LaF Wiki, which I’ll update soon.

Bethalina’s families are represented on both Filey Genealogy & Connections and Family Search Tree. I did some further research today, concentrating mainly on a second COWLING child that appears on FG&C. Thomas Marmaduke’s record shows he was born in 1856 and if that is correct then George could not have been his father.  Bethalina married Thomas FREEMAN in July 1857, so maybe he was the bio dad.

Thomas thoroughly confused the census enumerator in 1861 and the enumerators’ handwriting in that year and in 1871 has flummoxed the Find My Past transcribers.

Living with Thomas and “Bohahna” at 2, Wenlock Place in 1861 was “daughter in law” Mary CAWLING. There’s nothing much wrong with that, but his own boy and girl, William and Elizabeth, also bear the family name Cawling and relationship “in law”. In 1871 he has accepted Mary “COWLAND” as daughter and William as a Freeman. There are no signs of Thomas Marmaduke anywhere.

When I eventually caught up with the mystery child it was in Filey, marrying Mary Ann HOWE at St Oswald’s Church in 1903. (Mary Ann is “HOWL” in some transcribed sources.) He claimed, then, to be 45 years old and was therefore conceived after the marriage of Bethalina and Thomas Freeman.

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However, if he was truthful at the 1911 Census the connection becomes questionable. He gave his birthplace as Staindrop in County Durham. That place is in Teesdale Registration District and there is a likely record for him there but in June Quarter 1857. The mother’s maiden surname is given as HOWDEN.

Thomas Marmaduke’s wife gave her birthplace as Princes End, Staffordshire. This was an area between Tipton and Coseley in the Dudley Registration District. A convincing record gives her birth there in the June Quarter of 1878, mother’s maiden surname COLE. (The age difference between the couple is  16 years in the marriage register and 1911 Census return, and 15 years in the GRO Births Index.)

Mary Ann was about six months pregnant when she walked down the aisle. Thomas Marmaduke junior’s birth was registered in the quarter following the wedding. Curiously, FG&C gives the birthplace as Frankton near Rugby but the registration was made in Scarborough. The birthplace may be correct because in 1911 the family was living in Foleshill, Warwickshire, about ten miles away from Frankton.

A Sherburn Man

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William is remembered on the memorials in St Oswald’s (above) and Murray Street, though he was not a Filonian. His father Richard, a wheelwright and joiner, was from Langtoft; he married Esther VASEY in Allerston in 1873. After the arrival of two sons in Heslerton, the couple moved to Sherburn and were enumerated at an address in St Helen Street from 1881 to 1911.

William worked as a joiner and in 1901, age 20, he was a Visitor at Thomas Breckon’s butcher shop, 9 Union Street, Filey, with a motley crew of boarders that included a builder and bricklayer in addition to an apprentice butcher. Ten years later he was living in the town with his wife and their first child, Richard –  but he’d traveled a distance to find Daisy Ella, a Shropshire lass he married in Wolverhampton.

He was 33 years old when the First War began and, married with two children, I can’t imagine he rushed to volunteer. It seems more likely he would have been conscripted in, or after, 1916.

I haven’t been able to determine his whereabouts when he was killed. He joined one of the 24 Tank battalions that fought on the Western Front and in October 1918 he was with the 5th, probably taking part in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line. He may have died in the Battle of Courtrai (14-19 October) or on the first day of the Battle of the Selle (17-26 October).  He is buried at Tincourt New British Cemetery and remembered on Daisy Ella’s granite headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of DAISY ELLA HARLAND, died October 3rd 1953 and of her husband WILLIAM HARLAND, killed in action October 17th 1918.

William is on the FamilySearch Tree.

A Burmese Day

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William…who was drowned at Rangoon in Burmah

An exotic placename carved on a headstone in an English churchyard always raises questions and inspires conjecture. If there is a newspaper report “out there” explaining how 27-year old William WARE came to meet his maker I’d like to read it. In the meanwhile, I have to wonder if he fell out of a small boat on the turbid Irrawaddy of my childhood memory. Or was that the Limpopo? Thoughts then go further back in time to consider his journey out to the distant land. What forces pushed or pulled him there? Was he an agent of Empire or an adventurer? Was he traveling alone?

Filey Genealogy & Connections has one of William’s sisters but not the drowned man.

The full inscription on the headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard runs: –

In Affectionate Remembrance of RACHEL widow of the late THOMAS WARE

who died November 3rd 1885 aged 85 years

Also WILLIAM son of the above who was drowned at Rangoon in Burmah

October 15th 1858 aged 27 years

Also ANNIE ELIZABETH the beloved wife of RICHARD F. SCOTTER

and granddaughter of the above who died Feb 20th 1892 aged 27 years

Annie Elizabeth was one of 13 children born to Rachel and Thomas WARE’s younger daughter Ann and Thomas PETCH. She married Richard Ferguson SCOTTER in the December quarter of 1891 and died less than five months later.

Rachel DAVEY’s husband Thomas died at the age of about 39 in 1837. In 1861 widow Rachel, as old as the century and working as an “upholsteress”, had a house full in North Street, Scarborough. With her were daughter Ann, her husband Thomas Petch and four children, plus 18-year-old lodger Mary PETCH who may have been Thomas’s sister.

In 1871 Rachel’s company in North Street comprised her elder daughter Ellen, 41, and her husband John JONES. The Joneses appear to have been childless but in 1881 John was head of a household in Queen Street Filey, with Ellen, his mother in law Rachel – and Annie Elizabeth PETCH.  Annie was with the Jones couple, still in Queen Street, ten years later (masquerading as “Amelia” in the Find My Past transcription). In 1901 the Joneses were back in Scarborough, now in their early seventies and with another PETCH for company – Mary Ellen, single, aged 43.

From Find My Past I moved to FamilySearch and found something surprising that brought my attention back to William Ware. In the same quarter of 1858 in which he would have learned of his older brother’s death, John WARE married Rachel NEWTON in Scarborough. They named their first child William, born around September 1860 – in Adelaide. Their second child, Annie, was also born in the Australian Colonies, in 1864, but the next two, Thomas John and George Henry, entered the world back in “the home country”.

This information raises another bunch of questions – and speculation regarding the brothers as young boys. Did they ever talk about wandering the globe together? Did John go to Australia to complete a journey that William had dreamed of making?

The WARE Pedigree on FamilySearch.

HMS Royal Oak

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The seventh incarnation of HMS Royal Oak was torpedoed this day 1939, sinking 25 minutes after the first explosion into the dark, shallow waters of Scapa Flow. Of the ship’s crew of 1,234 men and boys, 833 were killed and the bodies of most who died remain on the vessel, now a protected war grave.

The family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard says Charles William BAILEY was “lost in HMS Royal Oak” so he is perhaps there still. It is one thing to see a single life remembered, another to see a list of those serving at the time of her sinking.

Charles William is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial and on the Filey Memorial in Murray Street.

He was unmarried when killed at age 40 but he has an extensive pedigree on FamilySearch Tree. The man most clearly responsible for his death, U-47’s commander Günther PRIEN, is not so blessed.

 

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Location of HMS Royal Oak in Scapa Flow: Open Street Map

 

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From a postcard © Wright & Logan, Southsea, accessed here

 

 

Crushed

Elizabeth Cook was an Essex girl, born 1826, but fifteen years later she was living in Church Street, Filey, with her widowed mother and two younger siblings. Five years later, aged 20, she married Richard LORRIMAN, a joiner. I have found four birth registrations for three girls and a boy. Eliza, Warris, and Ada Susannah reached adulthood and married but the girls left it rather late to have families and Warris registered his wife’s death in the same quarter as the birth of their first child, Richard Henry. The motherless boy was shipped from Castleford in the West Riding to Filey, where he was raised by his grandparents, Richard and Elizabeth. (Warris married again and had several children with Elizabeth NORFOLK.)

About 20 years earlier the elderly couple had lost their second child, Mary Jane, to a freak accident that must have scarred them both. The death certificate records that she was “crushed by the fall of a mangle”. She was three years old.

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Richard Henry’s step-mother seems to have been happy to leave him in Filey. In 1891, aged 13, he was living with Richard and Elizabeth in Hope Street, a few doors away from where I am writing this post. Ten years later he had returned to the West Riding. He married either Eleanor COLE or Grace HIGOTT in Leeds towards the end of 1901 but when the 1911 Census was taken he was living alone in Westfield Road, Leeds, married rather than widowed, and childless. He worked as a coal merchant and died in the summer of 1921 aged 43.

Mary Jane is Mary Ann on Filey Genealogy and Connections but somewhat more connected to her few known forebears than on FamilySearch Tree. Only her baptism is recorded there – as a “Lorryman”. Several of the characters on her FG & C pedigree are scattered about the World Tree and I’ll try to bring them together in the next few days.

My thanks to Brenda Pritchard in Canada who sent me the copy of Mary Jane’s death certificate some years ago.