Beatrice Novelli

6_20170406WheelhouseHouseReflected1_6mThe houses on Cliff Top in Today’s Image, reflected in a Filey Sands tidepool, have been flipped and turned so that they “look right”. The tallest dwelling is the old Coastguard house at the end of Queen Street, named Cliff Point when retired surgeon Claudius Galen Wheelhouse lived there.

I have been researching the SOUTHWELL family for a post next week and found Cliff Point mentioned, so I’m taking the opportunity of the photo “anniversary” to introduce Beatrice.

Her birth was registered twice, in the December Quarter of 1855, and in the March Quarter of the following year. Her given names were Helen Beatrice. She died in 1923 and on her gravestone she is Beatrice Helen. It may have been a bureaucratic slip but perhaps her parents had a change of mind after registration because she is “Beatrice H”, aged 5 at the 1861 census. The family name was transcribed as NOVELLE that year, NOVELLI in 1871 and NOVELLO in 1881. Beatrice married into the SOUTHWELLs in 1888, a family that also fell prey to government clerks. Beatrice Helen and Harry Glanville had nine children and two of their sons were sacrificed in the mud of Flanders. One is not easily traced because the CWGC has him under a different name to the one his family preferred.

Augustin Novelli was born in Manchester and described as a “Counselling Physician” in 1871. He must have had a lucrative practice because his household that year contained eight servants and a governess.

The SOUTHWELL household in 1871 was also well populated with servants. Harry Glanville Senior, ten years younger than Augustin, had seven servants. Obviously, being a “Clergyman without care of souls” paid well. He died unexpectedly between an afternoon of rabbit shooting and an evening game of billiards. The Stamford Mercury reported on 11 July 1890 that he had…

…by his many estimable qualities of mind and heart, won for himself more than common esteem and affection from all classes.

Harry Glanville Junior, aged 19 in 1881, was enumerated in the village of his birth, Limber Magna in Lincolnshire, but was staying with relatives. He gave his occupation as “rabbit fancier”. He must subsequently have decided to get serious about a career. Ten years later he was a law student, married to Beatrice, a father of three, and an employer of seven domestic servants, including two stud horsemen and a groom. A fourth child was born in Caistor in 1892 and the fifth in South Hampstead the following year. The London adventure was short-lived and the last four children entered the world in Filey. In 1901 the family was living on the Crescent but in somewhat diminished circumstances. They only had two servants. Harry was now a solicitor but perhaps not a successful one. It isn’t clear what came first, marriage break-up or Harry’s fall into drug addiction, but in 1908, while living in London, he took an overdose of “veronol” and died. The coroner’s verdict was “suicide whilst temporarily insane”.

In 1911 Beatrice was living in a house named ‘Bohemia’, in Mitford Street, Filey. Her 21-year- old son, Edmund, a law student, was with her. When he left Filey, Beatrice moved into a bungalow at Cliff Point, where she was looked after by a housekeeper, Grace JENKINSON, who clearly became a good friend. In February 1923, Beatrice was staying with Grace, not many doors away at 93 Queen Street. She had her own room and on the evening of the 17th, while getting ready for bed, her nightdress was set alight by the gas fire. Her screams for help were quickly answered, the flames extinguished and Dr. SIMPSON called. Sadly the burns and shock were severe enough to cause her death three days later.

G744_SOUTHWELLjanet_20180404_fst

To our dear mother, BEATRICE HELEN SOUTHWELL, born Oct 5 1855, died Feb 20 1923.

Desert Rat, Desert Fox

Libya

This satellite view of a small square of Libya, where rock and sand meet the Mediterranean Sea, is in the vicinity of El Agheila (Al Uqaylah). After Operation Compass routed the Italians in North Africa, the Allied Forces rested in this area – until Erwin Rommel’s infant Afrika Korps arrived to send them packing on this day 1941.

Cecil SIMPSON was born at Cayton and baptized at St Oswald’s, Filey, on 6th March 1918. He was, therefore, 21 years old when the Second World War began.  I don’t know how soon he joined the army but he was with the 1st Battalion Royal Northumberland Fusiliers when a force commanded by The Desert Fox ended his life.

Cecil is remembered on the Alamein Memorial in Egypt (located about 1,000 kilometers from where he died), on the Gristhorpe Memorial in Filey Parish, and on his parents’ headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

G113_SIMPSONjohn_20170503_fst

The pedigree of this branch of the Simpsons is not extensive on Filey Genealogy & Connections – and I have struggled today to find forebears on FST to whom he can be readily linked.

 

The Yawl ‘Ebenezer’

Captain Syd Smith’s database offers six fishing vessels named Ebenezer but only one yawl, registered as SH30, official number 14911. She was built in Scarborough in 1856 and was only three years old when she lost three of her crew. The Yorkshire Gazette of 9th April reported the tragedy.

Fatal Calamity at Sea

A deep gloom has been spread over Filey for the last few days, owing to the melancholy intelligence having been received on Saturday last that three fishermen, named Francis Haxby, William Sayers and Edmond Sayers, the two latter of whom were brothers, had met with a watery grave. This sad event occurred about four o’clock in the afternoon of Friday, the 1st inst., 30 miles distant from Flamborough Head. The particulars, so far as can be ascertained, are as follows:- The way in which fishing is carried on here, at this season of the year, is by proceeding out to sea a great distance, perhaps 50 miles, in large decked boats called yawls, manned with a crew of eight men. On reaching the fishing ground, two smaller boats called cobles, which are carried on the deck, are launched, three men getting into each. From these smaller boats the lines are put out, and will often extend for miles in length. The lines are taken in after a few hours, the cobles remaining attached to them. It was at this juncture the accident happened. There was a strong gale of wind blowing from the south-west, which, at this distance from the shore, brings on a dangerous sea. The yawl had broken its fore-yard, and whether the men in the coble had been directing their attention to this circumstance, not sufficiently regardful of their own perils, or from whatever other cause, must remain a mystery; but, sad to relate, on proceeding to the spot, nothing could be seen of the men,  –  the coble was there, and full of water. It is supposed a heavy sea had broken into her, or upset her, and that the coble had afterwards righted herself, – the poor fellows having been thrown out. It is to be regretted that the fishermen do not provide themselves with “life-belts,” to put on when following their dangerous calling; had these men had them their lives would probably have been saved. Edmond Sayers was an excellent swimmer, but this could be of little avail, encumbered as they are with clothing and heavy sea boots. William and Edmond Sayers are unmarried; Francis Haxby has left a wife and three young children. His widow will be entitled to some relief from the Shipwrecked Fishermen and Mariners Royal Benevolent Society, he having been a member of that noble institution. The bodies have not been recovered. The coble, too, and all the lines were lost.

Francis was part owner of Ebenezer, with his brother Jenkinson, Robert JENKINSON and Francis CRAWFORD. Jenkinson HAXBY skippered the boat. The vessel was transferred to Hull in the summer of 1876 and re-registered as H1228.

Francis is remembered on his parents’ headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, and on the stone below, which also names his wife, Susannah, and a fourth child, Mary, who died aged 5 years and 6 months, a year and a half before her father. Francis junior, the couple’s youngest child born in the spring of 1857, would drown from Eliza in October 1880.

D205_HAXBfrancis_20170928_fstb

Francis and the Sayers brothers on FamilySearch Tree.

A Chance Connection

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This morning’s sun was a glory so I carried on walking south to Reighton. Only a few hours have passed since I happened upon this stone but I can’t remember exactly where I saw it! Near the track up to The Bay, maybe. The date puzzled me. I have passed this way several times recently and not noticed the stone. Perhaps it was buried in the sand for over a year and the last storm scoured it out.

The lovingly remembered parents are not on FamilySearch, and as they were both born less than a hundred years ago I will leave it to the family to put them on the World Tree. Margaret’s mother was a CAMMISH, the second most populous family in Filey Genealogy and Connections so you can check out her pedigree here.

I photographed Mary Margaret’s headstone last summer.  ‘Dick’ LOVITT was a Hunts Cyclist who settled in Filey and started the fish shop in Mitford Street.

G40_LOVITTmarymgt20170723_fst

 

Oddchildren

 

1931_OddfellowsChildren3_4m
Photographer: A. T. Spencer, Hull, 1931

 

My mother fell 31 years short of receiving a birthday card from the Queen. She would have been 100 today. She is thirteen years old in the photograph above, masquerading as a French peasant girl. This seems rather faux as the theme of the gathering appears to be the promotion of British Empire produce.

My mother went to Lime Street School in Hull. A Board School built in 1879, it was blitzed in 1941 and subsequently demolished. The numbers and age range of the children suggest they may have all come from that one school for an end of academic year treat.

They are in the Oddfellows Hall, Charlotte Street. The names on the Honours Board at the back made place identification easy – if I’m correct in my deduction, that is.The framed portrait collection to the right celebrates Workers of the Centenary Year. (The Friendly Society was formed in 1810.)

My Pavlovian response to the names was, obviously, to see who I could find on FamilySearch Tree. James William WINDAS was hiding in plain sight. He was a yeast manufacturer.

1931_OddfellowsMum2_4mDoris Lockett left school at fifteen and worked in a grocer’s shop. My dad was a shop assistant too, but I can’t remember if their eyes met across a crowded stock room. In their late teens, they went on holiday to Blackpool, chaperoned by my grandmother, Ruth Anna. I think the photo below may have been taken there in 1937. I miss her but we meet occasionally in dreams and talk nonsense.

Mother1

 

ML.201

WATKINSONr_WW2Motor Launch 201 was one of eight such vessels in the 13th Flotilla of a Royal Navy Coastal Force based at Yarmouth during World War Two. On this day, 1941, one of its crew, Able Seaman, Robert WATKINSON, lost his life. One brief entry online records that he was “killed”. The marble block on the family grave in St Oswald’s churchyard says otherwise. I haven’t been able to determine what actually happened.

F142_WATKINSONrobt_20170602_fst

Filey Genealogy & Connections reveals an extensive pedigree, showing Robert’s descent from several of the town’s fishing families. On his father’s side a 3rd great grandfather is George JENKINSON, and on his mother’s George’s brother, Robert JENKINSON – the sons of Robert (1756-1808) and Margaret TRUCKLES.

Robert’s pedigree on FamilySearch Tree is waiting for the scattered fragments to be linked together. I have made a start.

Birth, Marriage, Death, and Burial

1902_HAXBYjenkSIGNATURE.Jenkinson, the last of the ten children born to Richard  HAXBY and Hannah CAMMISH, arrived on this day, 1875. When he was 27, and four years married to Sarah Lizzie SCOTTER, he attended the wedding of older brother Robert and signed the register.

Robert was a 35-year-old bachelor when he married Eliza WATKINSON, (29, spinster). The couple would have three children, George William, born 1903, Richard (1905) and Elizabeth Watkinson (1907).

On the 23rd March 1911, Robert was drowned about eight miles north-east of Flamborough Head.

1911_HAXBYrobt_NEWS

Though described in this report as a motor coble, I suspect Annie was perhaps a yawl – to have carried a small boat. In the Deaths at Sea Register (from whence the eight miles distance comes), Robert is listed as “2nd Hand”. I don’t know who the boy Cammish may have been and Captain Syd’s database doesn’t offer a likely candidate for Annie. It does, however, indicate that James DOUGLAS, born 1885, had taken ownership of Contest a week before this sad event. Perhaps the other Filey fisherman James, born 1860 and Sexton at St Oswald’s in his twilight years, was the owner named above.

The funeral of Robert’s son, Richard, lost from Joan Margaret (Tuesday’s post), took place on the 23rd March 1941. A small headstone also remembers his parents and William WATKINSON, an uncle I think.

E102_HAXBYrichd_20180320_fst

In loving memory of RICHARD HAXBY, killed by enemy action, 20th March 1941, aged 36.

‘Love’s last gift’

Also of his parents, ROBERT, lost at sea, 23rd March 1911, aged 43.

ELIZA, died 29th July 1944, aged 72.

Also, WILLIAM WATKINSON, died 2nd Jan 1934, aged 85.

The loss of Robert is also recalled on a much grander stone.

G726_HAXBYrichard_20170512_fst

The “Memory” to Robert on FST has the inscription.