Another Mistaken Mary

Mary Jane COLLING is a great-granddaughter of the elder Jane LUNDY (last Wednesday’s post) but today I discovered she has been abducted and married off to a West Riding boilermaker.

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You may wonder how Mary Jane could be mistaken for a COLLEY and be presented as a child of Jane JENKINSON and not the granddaughter she was.

There are two prime culprits. The 1881 census enumerator had a lapse of attention, entering Mary Jane as ditto, for “Colley”. But the correct relationship to the head of household is given.

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Fast forward to the computer age, and a similarly inattentive transcriber/digitizer of the CEBs.

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The given names of the “daughters” should have been one “tell” and the 12-year gap between them another, and more of a concern than the age of Jane, perhaps. Here is Mary Jane in her birth family –

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Sixteen was not a sweet age for Mary Jane. A verse on her headstone expresses sadness at leaving early.

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‘I.H.S.’

In loving memory of MARY JANE, beloved daughter of JOHN AND MARGARET COLLING and grand-daughter of WILLIAM AND JANE COLLEY, who died Sep 25th 1890, aged 16 years.

‘It was in the blooming of my youth

That death to me was sent

All you that have a longer time

Be careful to repent

For in my health I little thought

My days were run so near

But now the time for me has come

No longer to be here’

Also, the above WILLIAM COLLEY, the beloved husband of JANE COLLEY,

who died in the Lord Jan 23rd 1900, aged 72 years.

‘Gone but not forgotten’

Also, JANE his wife, who died Sep 2nd 1905, aged 77 years.

‘Kind thoughts shall ever linger

Round the graves where they are laid’

Richard the Boilermaker married Mary, daughter of butcher William Colley and Susannah. In 1881 she is with her parents, two brothers and two sisters in Stanley with Wrenthorpe, Wakefield. Twenty years later she is a wife and mother of two-year-old “Lawrance” in Goole. Sharing the dwelling in Kingston Street is Richard’s father, widower Edward Langton.

The Resting Places

When Paul gave me a quick tour of the churchyard to show me some of the headstones he and his helpers have repaired and restored, I showed him the grave of George Thomas Brown PLACE. This is how it looked in the summer.

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And yesterday…

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George was a Clerk in Holy Orders and served as a curate at St Oswald’s for a few years. He married his father’s housekeeper in 1906 when he was 47 years old. Emily HORNER was 35. They had one child, Mary Elinor, who was three-years-old when her father died.

The inscription stone has lost most of its leading but, in its much cleaner state, can be more readily deciphered.

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To the glory of God and in sacred memory of GEORGE THOMAS BROWN PLACE, called to higher service May 12th 1910.

EMILY PLACE, re-united Dec 24th 1939, and their daughter, MARY ELINOR PLACE, died March 20th 1985.

‘Non Omnis Moriar’

George was the eldest of seven children. Four of his siblings died in infancy, and brother Arthur Ernest at age 19. The youngest, sister Jane, married Thomas SAWYER of York and had three children with him.

Find the family on the Shared Tree.

Today’s Image

On Crescent Hill this afternoon, the prospect was somewhat different to what it was nine years ago.

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More Colley Wobbles

And another contrary Mary.

Francis COLLEY, born in Folkton in 1785, is not related by blood to young Jane LUNDY, the supposed descendant of Boudicca. He had at least nine children with Mary, born Colley, who was also not related to him by blood. All the children entered the world in Filey but on the FamilySearch Shared Tree they had, until yesterday, some younger siblings who were born in Sheffield. Mother Mary would have been sixty-years-old or thereabouts when she gave birth to the last of them.

My breakfast reading at the moment is A Measure of Darkness, by Jonathan & Jesse Kellerman, and this morning I read about the discovery of a dozen credit cards found on the corpse of a Jane Doe. A different name on each card. Clay, our resourceful narrator, begins to search for the owners of the stolen, cloned or faked cards. He opines…

Without a second data point, a name is close to meaningless.

The FamilySearch ‘system’ had a Mary, married to Francis Colley, as the mother on a bunch of christening records. For each, they had another data point – the christening place – but this was ignored. So Filey Mary and Sheffield Mary were treated as one.

I looked for the Sheffield mother’s birth family name and decided it was COCKAYNE. Foolishly, I attached this detail to Sheffield Mary and thereby gave several instances of her Filey counterpart the surname Cockayne. (Both women had several IDs, one for each christening source.)

It took a while to clear up my mess but I think I have left the Sheffield Colleys in reasonable shape. There are some issues that still need to be addressed. Search in Records on FST for Mary Cockayne, born Sheffield in 1800 and the top hit currently shows William Cockayne and Betty as her parents. Clicking on her tree icon returns Filey’s Mary Colley. Mary Cockayne has a different ID and one possible duplicate for a Maria Colley. I don’t know how to fix this bizarre glitch.

If you have linked to the Sheffield Colleys on FST, you will see there are few sources given for the family. Harriet had been given a precise birthdate in 1848, without a source. I have added the GRO registration for 1840. This Harriet did not die in infancy. She went on to marry and is aged 60 in the 1901 census. (She married Marriott HALL on 11 June 1863. On the same day, in the same place, her sister Emily married Leonard COOKE.)

The apparent firstborn, Francis William, has a christening source but awaits his bride, Sarah BANKS (possibly MP6P-BVS). The marriage took place in 1857 when Francis William and Jonathan worked in their father’s Leather business. Francis senior employed 11 men in 1851 and the firm advertised a number of times for journeymen curriers over the next ten years. But in 1861 the father is listed in the census as “Out of Business”. Jonathan remains in the family home, aged 28 and unmarried, described as a Leather Dealer. A bit more research revealed that the partnership of father and two sons was dissolved by mutual consent on the last day of 1859. Jonathan continued to run the company under its original name, Francis Colley & Sons.

In the 1850s, Francis senior’s name appears a number of times in the local newspapers, sometimes twinned with that of his brother in law. In the Election for Sheffield Guardians in 1857, Thomas Bagshaw Cockayne came ninth in the race and Francis tenth. Both just missed out, as because only eight Guardians were elected. Twelve years later, both men were re-elected as Directors of the Sheffield Waterworks Company.

Returning to the coast and the other Francis and Mary. Six of their nine known children died in infancy. Although Filey Genealogy & Connections denies a blood relationship, the marriage record shows they were from the same parish. Love is perhaps blind to the size of gene pools. The three that survived childhood married. I don’t think I have all the offspring of these unions yet: five to John Colley and Martha PRETTY, and two to Jane (the second) and Robert Benjamin FOWLER. It seems that Robert Colley and Betsy HARPER, marrying in their mid-forties, left it too late to start a family.

Today’s Image

I don’t have a picture to illustrate the Colley story, but I offer a Glamour shot instead. The white glint on the horizon of the Filey Sands photo is the Vos Glamour. She looks somewhat raddled – handheld in poor light with the point and shoot at max zoom. Plenty of pictures online though – and I found this short YT video mesmerising. Oddly, Ship AIS had her down as a Passenger/Ferry. Fake Shipping News.

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Jane Lundy x2

The two Janes are of different generations and not related by blood, but are both connected to the same unfortunate man. Young Jane is the mother of Joseph Edward COLLEY, who drowned from SD Research in 1925. The older Jane is a great grandmother on his father’s side.

I have sought to establish the parentage of old Jane, born who knows where or when, and have so far failed. In 1841 she is with husband John and all five of her known children, in Prospect Place, Filey. Her age is given as 38 but her death registration nine years later says she was 56-years-old. If that is correct, she was 33 when she had the first child for whom there is a christening record. In the absence of a marriage source, we can only wonder if she gave birth to children before William in 1827. And dying before the 1841 census deprives us of a birthplace more specific than “Yorkshire”.

Filey Genealogy & Connections runs with Jane as the wife of John Colley.

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The FamilySearch Shared Tree is uncertain, offering three possibilities.

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Jane&Sarah

Mary and Sarah get the red lights because there are no sources to support their existence, let alone the relationship with John.

The third and the most compelling possibility has a “just Jane”, married to John and with just one child – the seeming first-born, William. With Jane JENKINSON, William has five children and two or three generations of descendants that bring the family into the 20th century. There is only a christening source for William and neither John nor Jane have birth and death dates. But they are both buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Sacred to the memory of JANE, wife of John COLLEY, Master Mariner, who died May 5th 1850 aged 56 years.

‘A loving wife, a friend sincere

A tender mother lieth here

In love she liv’d, in peace she died

Her life was crav’d but God denied’

Also, the above named JOHN COLLEY, who died Oct 13th 1872, aged 79 years.

‘Blessed are the dead

Which die in the Lord’

Old Jane’s parents may be impossible to find but Young Jane connects to a “super pedigree”. I don’t suppose for a moment that she knew of her direct descent from kings of Wales, Man, Mercia, Saxony, the Franks, the Goths, and the Visigoths. Take a pinch of salt, start here (where Young Jane connects to “Wrong Mary”), and see how far you can go. On my first run, I reached Julius Caesar and on the third Boudicca, Queen of the Iceni. Your mileage may vary.

Going to Waugh

It isn’t unusual for Filey Pedigrees to be Y Line heavy. Here is an example. It is based on information in Filey Genealogy & Connections.

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The Filey spear side of the family represented here is the 9th most populous in Kath’s database. In the two times great-grandparents column, I have given the other positions in the Names Table. (The count is a rough one and includes married women.)

I have been told recently that not a great deal is known about the distaff side. Three male 2xggps are not known to me but all 16 on the female side are missing from FG&C. (Boxes that are a darker blue/pink indicate that the family name is known at those locations.)

I have kept the male line identity anonymous for now, but I expect that the sequence of names in the 5th generation may amount to a unique code. Perhaps someone reading this will crack it. (Don’t forget the “9th” clue.)

The FamilySearch Shared Tree is a revelation, though it flatters to deceive. There are two men called Thomas WAUGH vying for supremacy in one generation. Both have a surprisingly high number of sources but neither looks “right”. They present their genetic credentials in this edited FST screenshot.

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Annie Elizabeth Waugh is the daughter of Thomas WAUGH and Annie PEARS. The couple married towards the end of 1877 in Hexham, so you can safely dispose of any children born before little Annie.  Her seeming twin, Pollie, should be sent back to Barnsley, where she belongs. The left panel has Annie Elizabeth’s full sister, Margaret Hannah, but all other children can be cleared from that field. Mother Annie died in 1883 at age 29 and Margaret Hannah quit life’s struggle the following year, aged two.

With two infant girls to care for, Thomas the Coal Miner wasted no time seeking a mother for them. He married Elizabeth BROWN within a year of his first wife’s death. In 27 years of marriage, Thomas and Elizabeth had five children, three of whom died before the 1911 census. The survivors were John Thomas and George Edward. Edith Brown WAUGH is the only casualty of childhood for whom I can find a reliable birth registration. Two other Waugh children with a Brown mother (Elizabeth Ann and Christopher) died in infancy but they were born in a different registration district. Chester-le-Street is almost 50 miles east of Haltwhistle, where Edith had been born, but it is only a few miles further to Houghton le Spring where their fifth child came into the world.

Annie Pears’ daughter, now “Annie Lizzie”, married miner George GLAISTER towards the end of 1898, in Gateshead. The birth of their first child and the death of the father were registered in the same quarter, about nine months later. I haven’t found a newspaper notice of George’s death, but he may not have set eyes on his daughter. She was given the names Annie Elizabeth Georgina.

Georgina wasn’t an only child. After a few years of widowhood, her mother married Thomas NOBLE in Gateshead and at the 1911 census, the house in Broomfield Terrace, Crawcrook, sheltered the parents and five children, including Georgina’s half-sister Hannah Lilian and half-brother Stanley.

When George’s girl married in 1919, she was just Georgina – and her granddaughter married into a Filey family.

 

‘Jack Sled’

26 November 1925: In newspaper reports alerting readers to the disappearance of the steam drifter Research off Flamborough Head, John Robert JENKINSON was referred to as ‘Jack Sleddie’ or ‘Jack Slade’. The Leeds Mercury explained the variant name…

…a characteristic of Filey fishermen, being that all of them and their families are known by a by name.

The Mercury’s Own Correspondent went on to say of Jack…

[he] has saved lives on several occasions at the risk of his own, jumping overboard more than once to rescue men who have been swept off by a wave.

The fear on this day was that Jack had drowned, with two of his sons, two sons in law and two distant cousins. Eight Filey Men in Lost Boat.

There was some confusion initially. The storm that caused the disappearance of Research sank the Scottish boat Ardilley, but its crew was rescued “at the last gasp” by the trawler Beryl and taken safely to Hull.

Confirmation that the fishermen on Research had perished came the next day when objects from the vessel were pulled from the sea at Hornsea. They included a couple of bits of wood, one bearing the letter ‘Y’ and the other ‘42’. Built in 1902, Research had previously been registered at Lowestoft, Peterhead and North Shields. Although a recent arrival to Scarborough, she still carried her Great Yarmouth registration mark, YH421.

Here is the Hull Daily Mail report on the 26th.

FILEY CREW MISSING

FEARED LINK WITH FLAMBOROUGH DISASTER

SCARBOROUGH, Thursday – There is no news up to this afternoon of the steam drifter, Research, which went out of Scarborough, in company with the steam drifter, Boy Hector, on Tuesday night at 11 o’clock, and ostensibly was fishing off Flamborough Head on Wednesday morning, when the fierce gale arose.

There are now grave fears that the Research was the boat that was seen to go down off Flamborough Head, but there is no confirmation as yet.

The Research, which is one of the oldest drifters sailing out of Scarborough, was manned by a Filey crew, under the charge of William Cammish, of Scarborough, as follows:

John Robert Jenkinson, better known as Jack Sleddie;

Robert and George Jenkinson (his sons);

George Cammish and William Colley (sons in law of J. R. Jenkinson);

Ted Colley, and

Ted and George Jenkinson (two brothers, younger members of the family).

The engineer is a North Shields man.

The owners of the vessel are Messrs. T. Melrose and sons Ltd, North Shields, but she is run out of Scarborough under the management of the Filey Utd. Steam Trawling Company Ltd.

VAIN SEARCH ON THE ROCKS

Nothing to trace the identity of the steam drifter which was sunk off Flamborough Head in Wednesday’s storm is yet available (wires the “Mail” Flamborough correspondent).

Searchers have been on the rocks all night, but nothing has been found.

A party of Filey fishermen have just visited Flamborough to gain a description of the craft, as a Filey crew – skipper Jenkinson, his two sons and another six members of the crew are missing.

The reporter got a couple of the crew names wrong. There wasn’t a George Cammish or William Colley aboard. Other newspapers published mangled family names. The most accurate in the first couple of days was a Shields newspaper but they named the only man who wasn’t from Filey as “engineer Southern”, a married man with five children.

Three headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard bear the steam drifter’s name.

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Joseph Edward COLLEY was the Mate on Research and not related to the Jenkinsons. Named in some reports as skipper, William Cappleman CAMMISH is remembered on his mother’s stone. She had died nine years earlier. Not surprisingly, the grave of Jane Baxter Crimlisk, Jack Sled’s daughter, remembers most of the drowned fishermen.

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In loving memory of JANE B. CRIMLISK, born 1885, died Sep 20 1931.

Also of her husband GEORGE J. CRIMLISK, born 1885, and her father and brothers, JOHN R. JENKINSON born 1862, ROBERT JENKINSON born 1890, GEORGE F.B. JENKINSON born 1897, WILLIAM C. CAMMISH born 1895, all drowned in the ‘Research’ disaster, Nov 25 1925.

JAMES H.N. JENKINSON, born 1892, lost at sea 1911

‘Loved in life, treasured

in memory’

Also of FANNY ELIZABETH, widow of JOHN ROBERT JENKINSON, died March 27 1939, aged 75.

‘She suffered much, but murmured not’

Also of LILLIAN her daughter, widow of WM. C. CAMMISH, died Aug 6th 1949, aged 54.

‘Reunited in Heavenly love’

MATTHEW JENKINSON, died in infancy.

aw_JackSled1913_jswsThis man, photographed in a group outside the Ebenezer Chapel between 1910 and 1913, is named as “J. Sled” in an album kindly loaned to me some years ago by Ann Wilkie (WILLIS).  He would have been about 50-years-old. Photographer: Rev Stanwell.)

Find Jack and his family on the Shared Tree­ and their story told in more detail here.

Research is constantly remembered on Filey Promenade.

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A Dynasty

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This modest house in Chapel Street was the last home of William ROSS and his wife Mary Elizabeth before they died in 1921 and 1931, aged 82 and 92, respectively. On their headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard it says after Mary’s inscription: –

We shall meet in the sweet bye and bye.

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Kath has this note in Filey Genealogy & Connections: –

…see the story of the Ross family – how William was saved and became religious. His brother Castle Ross was a well-known minister. 1867: a labourer – see also Kendall’s ‘Storm’.

It is tempting to imagine him being rescued from drowning in a storm while fishing and following the Lord’s advice to get a labouring job on land. But he is a fisherman in the 5 censuses from 1871 to 1911. and in 1883 he was (probably) the captain of the yawl Tranquility. I have written about it before but here again is the story from The Scarborough Mercury of 3 August.

SUDDEN DEATH ON BOARD A YAWL.-On Monday morning, about 5-30, as the yawl Tranquility was about to proceed to sea, one of the men named Charles Hamilton, a native of Barton upon Humber, was observed by the Captain, William Ross, to sit down. The Captain asked him if he was ill, but the deceased made no reply. Seeing the man looking very ill the skipper ordered the boat to be launched and the deceased was rowed on shore, and the doctor was sent for with all speed, but on Dr. Orr’s arrival he found life to be extinct. The deceased had a wife living at Hull. He had only arrived at Filey on Saturday night last and gone on board the yawl that morning. An inquest will be held.

Other than this distressing event, William and Mary’s lives together in Filey seem to have been unremarkable. Before she married, aged 20, Mary had lost her father to the sea. John WILLIAMSON was drowned off Reighton in 1858, I think from the coble Rachael & Anne. Death took one of her six children in 1877 when young Thomas Castle was just 7, but four married and produced at least 19 grandchildren. Tragedy would strike some of William and Mary’s descendants – and great wealth would accrue to others in the extended family. And my parents would contribute to the Ross fortune, by feeding their frozen foods to me when I was a child.

William was the uncle of Thomas Ross, son of older brother John and Eliza WHEELER. Thomas crossed the Humber to seek his fortune and found it in Grimsby, founding the firm that became Ross Frozen Foods.

William was a granduncle to John Carl Ross, son of Thomas and Maria BANNISTER. John Carl took over the business when his father retired and ensured its continuing success.

John Carl’s grandson David, William’s second great grand nephew, grasped an early opportunity offered by technology and quickly amassed a fortune estimated at £873 million. But he flew too near the sun.

I don’t know if the Ross Family representation on the FamilySearch Shared Tree mirrored what happened “in real life”. The family was connected on Filey Genealogy but split on FST. I doubt there really was a rift between those who stayed in Filey to continue long-line fishing from small boats and the Ross adventurers who built a fleet of distant water trawlers. Whatever, I’ve built the bridge on FST. You could start with the Dynast John Carl and travel back in time to Old Filey. There are images aplenty online – just search for ‘Ross frozen foods’.