Missing Children

When William ANNIS filled out the 1911 census form he declared that his wife Mary had given birth to eight living children, of whom seven had subsequently died.

The survivor was Jane Alice (yesterday’s post). I had birth registrations for only three children, Jane 1, Jane 2 (I thought) and William in between. My search for the other five raised only one – a third Jane. This child replaced Survivor Jane but, rather disturbingly, her birth registration precedes the death of Jane 1. In the absence of birth registrations, I hoped to find notifications of the deaths of the missing children. I found nothing.

I looked in newspapers to see if father William had caught the attention of local journalists. The only story I turned up concerned a William Annis in Gloucester. Jane Alice’s father gave his birthplace as Gloucester at census time so, just maybe…

Gloucester Citizen 21 September 1889

Assault on an Old Man

James Goode was summoned by William Annis for assault at Flaxley Meend, on the 10th inst. From evidence it appeared that defendant called complainant, an old man, names, and on the latter threatening to throw a stone at him, he ran at him and gave him a blow on the head. Fined 10s. and costs or 14 days.

Our William would have been 65 at the time, with 22 years and three days of life ahead of him.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM ANNIS, died Sep 13th 1911, aged 87.

Also MARY his wife, died Aug 29th 1913, aged 80

‘At rest’

 

Bringing Jane into Focus

Jane lived for 88 years, married twice but didn’t bring any children into the world. She is memorialised on two headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Jane married John William COWLING on 8 December 1888 and just over four months later he drowned from the coble Concord. His stone has not fared well and much of the inscription is illegible, though its emotive carving has survived.

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Jane’s father, William ANNIS, was a Gloucester man, a labourer and brickmaker who made his way to Yorkshire and married Filey-born Mary CHAPMAN. They named their first child Jane but she died before her third birthday. A boy, William, came along a couple of years later and then another girl they called Jane. They gave her a middle name, Alice, but after the birth registration and baptism, this seems to have been forgotten. Kept from the record keepers at least.

Two years after John William’s death, Jane was in service to Elizabeth ATKINSON, a lodging house keeper on The Crescent in Filey. Seven years later, aged 34, she married Francis CRIMLISK, a grandson of Thomas and Catherine (McDEVITT), who came over from Ireland when Victoria became queen.

The 1901 census found Jane and Francis in Jones Yard, Queen Street and ten years later at 1, Cammish Yard. And it was there that Francis died on 13 May 1929.

Jane stayed in Filey for some years. In 1939 she was living alone at 27 Newthorpe, still working at the age of 75, as a Ladies Conveniences Attendant. At some point, she moved to Pocklington, where she died in The Poplars on 4 February 1953. Formerly the Pocklington Workhouse, then a Care Home for the Elderly, it has now been demolished. There is a photograph of it here.

The headstone made for Francis had promised that he would meet Jane again.

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Jane and Francis are not yet united on FamilySearch Tree. There’s work to do!

Jane Alice ANNIS

Francis CRIMLIS.

Edward COWLING (John William’s father).

Just Williams

I made another attempt today to discover where William ALDEN originated. In the 1881 census, he gives his birthplace as “Hornsey”, Yorkshire. I took this to be Hornsea. In 1891 he offers “Hatfield”, possibly Great Hatfield just four miles from Hornsea. In 1901 it is back to “Hornsey” and in 1911 “Hornsea”. Both William and Ann are wayward in giving their ages but a fuzzy search for William in Skirlaugh Registration District between the start of civil registration and 1843 doesn’t find him.

Looking again at the census, I was distracted by a William Alden working as a Carter in Skipsea with a calculated birth year of 1840, between one and three years older than Ann’s future husband may have been. He gave his birthplace as Thorpe, in Norfolk. The fact that Ann’s parents had married in Skipsea 29 years earlier gave me pause. (Perhaps she met him while visiting relatives and fell instantly in love.) After searching for this William in the Norwich area records, and coming up blank, I’m still wondering.

I also looked in newspapers for a Norfolk William who may have been driven from the county of his birth by a shameful deed. I found a William Alden, who could conceivably have been our man’s father, committing suicide by throwing himself from Whitefriar’s Bridge into the River Wensum. This was in 1856, the place of demise just a few miles from Thorpe. (It was suggested at the coroner’s inquest that “the deceased had suffered from a kind of religious fanaticism, and had also been much depressed in spirits”.)

I think I’ll let Ann’s William rest in peace, with his secrets buried with him in Filey churchyard.

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A Missing Marriage

The funeral of Ann ALDEN took place 102 years ago. She was buried close to her son William, who had died eleven years earlier, and her yearling nephew William Edwin. (A cross marks their spot.)

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On the 1911 census form, William wrote that he had been married for 46 years and that he and Ann had eight children, of whom one had died. I have found the birth registrations of seven children, so one is missing.

I have been unable to find a civil or parish record of the marriage, so that is missing too.

Ann’s firstborn, Joseph, arrived on 11 April 1865, 45 years and 51 weeks before the 1911 census. William’s calculations may have been misjudged but I could not turn up a marriage in England and Wales in 1863 or 1864.

A woman called Ann Raine did, however, marry in Driffield in the last quarter of 1864. This town is not many miles from Lebberston, where the Aldens lived for most of their married life. This Ann’s husband was either Thomas BOYES or William HOLLAND. Before you write both fellows off, say Alden and Holland a few times, aloud. It is a stretch, I know, but perhaps the clerk was hard of hearing.

William and Ann’s children are no trouble to the Scarborough Registrar, though the mother’s maiden surname is not always right as RAIN. So the missing marriage registration is odd. A cursory search for Holland children between 1864 and 1870 found none in the East Riding of Yorkshire. In the same period, Driffield saw an influx of BOYES (both sexes), some of them the offspring of the aforementioned Thomas and his wife Martha STOCKELL.

Marriages Dec 1864
Boyes  Thomas    Driffield  9d 571
Holland  William    Driffield  9d 571
Raine  Ann    Driffield  9d 571
Stockell  Martha    Driffield  9d 571

Source: Free BMD

Find Ann on FamilySearch Tree.

Cant

An unusual name for a boy. I have been engaged in “workhouse work”, adding peripheral people to families on FamilySearch before giving those with Filey connections their headstone photographs. When Lily ALDEN married John William in 1899 she acquired two in-law Cant Candler SHEPHERDs, a brother and father. The father’s mother was Elizabeth CANDLER. Her father was born in 1785, and it seems unlikely that he was Cant the First.

It appears that Elizabeth’s younger brother, Cant, went to the United States, married Millicent Holliday, had nine children with her and died in Shipman, Illinois on 8 December 1901 aged 82 ( four days short of his 83rd birthday). There’s a photo of his gravestone here.

Four thousand miles away and four months earlier, unrelated by blood but nonetheless connected, William Edwin ALDEN, Lily’s nephew, died a year and three days after he had been baptised in St Thomas’ Church, Gristhorpe.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM EDWIN, the dearly loved child of WILLIAM AND MARY E. ALDEN of Gristhorpe, who died Aug 8th 1901, aged 13 months.

Also, MAGGIE their little child who died in infancy.

‘Suffer little children to come unto Me’

Also of WILLIAM ALDEN, dearly beloved husband of MARY E. ALDEN of Gristhorpe, died Sep 12th 1906, aged 37.

More on the Aldens tomorrow.

Election Results

I’m not sure what to make of them. My underdogs didn’t win a single seat. “UKIP is finished”. I’ve heard this a time or two today on the radio but consider it cant. (‘Hypocritical and sanctimonious talk, typically of a moral, religious, or political nature.’)

It wasn’t so long ago…

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Ship Inn Yard, 20 May 2014

The Impossible Wife

It was only a few days ago, but I have already forgotten what steps led me to Mary Jane JENKINSON. My genealogy workflow has always been rather chaotic and I have been attempting to instil some discipline into it. To keep track of Filey people, I now have a couple of Excel spreadsheets and several lists (in Word) to monitor chronology (important dates), locations and other things that seem important. There is rather more duplication of data input than I’d like but, hey, I have nothing better to do.

Anyway, I found Mary Jane on FamilySearch Tree married to the wrong man. My constant and mostly reliable guide, Filey Genealogy & Connections, waved the warning flag.

FamilySearch, as I write, has given Martin GULLEN three wives.

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You will notice that Jane and Mary Jane share the same family name and dates of birth and death. They also share a couple of children.

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Jane is without parents on both FST and FG&C. She was baptised on 6 April 1867 at the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Filey by her mother, Jane Jenkinson née COATES. The name of the child’s father is not known – she arrived a couple of years after her mother’s first husband drowned. Jane the Younger, had five Jenkinson half-brothers and sisters but they all acquired a stepfather when Jane the Elder married John PRESTON in 1870.

Jane, the first wife of Martin Gullen, died on the 5 August 1914 in Gristhorpe (Filey Parish) and is remembered on Martin’s headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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JANE, the beloved wife of MARTIN GULLEN of Gristhorpe, died Aug 5th1914, aged 47.

‘Farewell dear husband be content

For unto you I was but lent;

Weep not for me nor sorrow make

But love my children for my sake.’

There were five children. The youngest, Edith Mary, was seventeen when her mother died. Edith’s “other mother” on FST died childless on 7 September 1940. The only child of Matthew “Walsher” Jenkinson and Elizabeth née BAXTER. Mary Jane married John Richard HAXBY in Yarmouth in 1912, at the age of 46.

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I messaged Isobel via FST to suggest the “impossibility” of Mary Jane and have been given permission to make the necessary changes to the pedigree. Isobel is Martin’s great-granddaughter so I feel under some pressure to get things right first time.

I will unlink Mary Jane, marry her to John Richard and also wed Lily Shepherd née ALDEN to her first husband.

A stone has fallen next to Martin’s grave. It remembers Tom Gullen and his two wives, Alice and Emma Louise. Neither woman has forebears on FST. More work!

Labour

20190524CorbynLabourI didn’t pay much attention to the Labour Party’s invitation to vote for its candidates in the EU Elections. Yesterday I caught wind of a stench emanating for this organization. One of their cats, from years ago, had escaped from the bag. Flea-bitten, covered in sores. Stinking. This morning I watched Dionne “go off on one”. A former policewoman, she had picked up on what Carl Benjamin has just revealed. She is very angry. In seven terrible minutes, she might make you angry too – and vow never to vote for Labour again. Not just because of Corbyn’s Brexit betrayal. There is no chance whatsoever of Labour bringing this benighted, laughing-stock nation together. (If the links don’t work you will know the filthy story is true and hopefully will find other ways of getting out into the wild.)

Another Mystery Pearson

John was the son of Charles PEARSON and first wife Martha SIMPSON. The parents and several of his siblings are remembered in the churchyard but John isn’t to be found there. This is surprising as he had been the sexton at St Oswald’s.

The Scarborough Mercury on the last day of 1909 informed readers of his passing.

Another misfortune was the death which took place yesterday of Mr. John Pearson, the old sexton. So well known was he that his death, which came suddenly at the end, was regarded as a town’s matter-for the sexton was almost part of Filey. Visitors to the Parish Church will have seen him frequently. He was an aged man, well on to 80 years, and was quite a character in his way. He had been poorly for some little time past, and had been medically attended. It is thought that he had had a fit during the night, and died. Just over a year ago he was married for the third time. It was thought, at first, that there would be an inquest, but as he had been medically attended, it was deemed that an inquiry was not necessary. He had been sexton for very many years.

John’s age at death is given as 71 in the GRO Index. In Filey Genealogy & Connections he has only two wives listed but Kath acknowledges Elizabeth the Second in a note, but is not sure of who she is, adding “[there’s a] choice of a few in 1908”.

I have also been unable to determine who won the heart of John after Elizabeth the First died in 1874. Twist my arm and I’d say it was Elizabeth JENKINSON, daughter of George and Elizabeth née SIMPSON (and not related to him by blood through his mother). I’m not sure enough to add this marriage to FamilySearch Tree. John has, as yet, a tenuous foothold on FST. His half brothers and sisters have a better representation.

On Friday 10 January The Scarborough Mercury had this:-

Mrs. Pearson, wife of the sexton, of the Parish Church, died on Wednesday evening at about seven  o’clock, at her home in Church  Hill. She had been ill for some time.

John married Jane GREEN on 21 November that year and died thirteen months later.

Today’s Image

Since receiving its award last year, Nuns Walk has been made more suitable for the tenderfoot. The path borders have been skelped and, it seems, dosed with weedkiller. I preferred it in a wilder, more natural state.

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