What Happened to Ada?

She didn’t make the cut for remembrance on the family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Doris and Phyllis Ida are two of the four daughters Ada had with Frederick Herbert. In 1911 the family was complete and living together in Abbeydale Road, Sheffield. Frederick, 44, was working as an Assurance Superintendent and Ada, a year younger, had her hands full with six children, from Sidney, 18, down to Marjorie aged seven.

Thirty years earlier, Ada WHEATLEY, 13, was living with her parents in Daniel Hill, Sheffield, less than two miles from the HORRABIN family. Ada isn’t given an occupation but Frederick, 14, is said to be a “school teacher”. At the end of the year, though, Ada is a witness in the case of The Crown v. Dover. Described as a servant, it isn’t clear whether she was in the full-time employ of Thomas SKINNER, who had died of arsenic poisoning. There is an account of the case on Wikipedia with several photographs, including one of the modest house in which the killing took place. It looks too small to have needed a housekeeper and servants. Thomas has an interesting back story – and a Wikipedia page – but no place on FamilySearch Shared Tree. His killer, under her full name, can be found there, but she only has her father for company.

Ada may have acquired a taste for drama from her participation in the murder trial. She found herself in the newspapers again in 1888.

The Stuart Wortley Working Men’s Club, Daniel Hill – The first entertainment was held at this club on Monday evening. Mr. R. Gleadhill presided, and a very excellent programme was gone through. Mr. Harris, Miss Ada Wheatley, and Mr. J. S. Marshall, assisted by a portion of the Society Minstrel Troupe, gave every satisfaction in rendering their songs, readings, and ballads.

Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 19 April

I wonder if this is where Frederick first set eyes upon Ada. They were married three years later.

Ada died in the spring of 1941 in Sheffield, aged 73. I don’t know how long Frederick stayed in the city before moving to the coast. His last address is given as 38 The Crescent in the burial register. His spinster daughters died from the house they shared in West Avenue, Doris in 1968 and Phyllis in 1973. I wonder if anyone remembers them – and knows what happened to Ada.

(The guilty Kate Dover didn’t serve her whole of life sentence. She was released from Woking Female Prison about 1895 and must, therefore, have done time with the innocent Florence MAYBRICK. Though the two women had arsenic in common, I can’t imagine them being friends.)

Mark of Man 67 · Churchyard

St Oswald’s, Filey

Grave Images

Over the last couple of weeks I have snapped over 2,600 photographs of St Oswald’s churchyard. The aim was to capture every grave, unmarked or with a headstone, flower container or kerb. There are 2,148 inscriptions in the East Yorkshire Family History Society’s 2014/15 Survey – my “extras” include stones added in the last five years plus context shots to assist in the creation of an accurate churchyard map.

Processing and matching the photographs to the 1977 Crimlisk and EYFHS Surveys, and drawing the map, will take hundreds of hours over possibly several more lockdowns. I’m hoping the effort will generate some blog posts along the way. Time will tell.

Quote of the Day

We need to increase public understanding of the need for medical countermeasures such as a pan corona virus vaccine. A key driver is the media and the economics will follow the hype. We need to use that hype to our advantage to get to the real issues. Investors will respond if they see profit at the end of the process.

Peter Daszak (about five years ago).

Mark of Man 66 · Bench

By the Old Tip Nature Reserve

A Confusion of Parrotts, Part 1

Reviewing my current list of “Stone People” this morning, I noticed that Emily Etta PARROTT was in need of a FamilySearch Tree ID.

This memory of her probably brings a smile to most people who notice the stone by the west wall of the churchyard.

Born in Upton, Lincolnshire, she was with Mary Elizabeth in Filey when the census was taken in 1901. They offered lodging to visitors at 4 Rutland Street.

Photographed this afternoon

That year, Emily was 27 and Mary 32. Some of Mary’s forebears were established in Filey before the end of the 16th century and it would be interesting to know how she formed such a strong bond with the daughter of an agricultural labourer from the other side of the Humber. The two women appear to have lived together to the end of their days, Mary departing first aged 91 and Emily following about fifteen months later.

About three years ago I found Emily’s parents on the Shared Tree, their record associated with the christening of their first child in 1856. Looking today for a more substantial pairing I happened upon Emily’s older brother George Woodward Parrott. Five years separate them, and both were born in Upton – but although they should have the same biological mother, George has been placed with  Elizabeth nee DOWLE.

This Elizabeth’s husband George died in 1911; “just Elizabeth”, mother of Sarah Elizabeth and Emily Etta, buried her George in 1885. The GRO Births Index shows her maiden surname.

PARROTT, Sarah Elizabeth, Mother’s Maiden Surname: VICKERS. GRO Reference: 1857 J Quarter in GAINSBOROUGH Volume 07A Page 629.

PARROTT, George Woodward, Mother’s Maiden Surname: VICKERS. GRO Reference: 1868 S Quarter in GAINSBOROUGH Volume 07A Page 713.

PARROTT, Emily Etty (sic), Mother’s Maiden Surname: VICKERS. GRO Reference: 1873 D Quarter in GAINSBURGH (sic) Volume 07A Page 722.

The confusion doesn’t end here. The eldest brother of Sarah, George and Emily – Tom – is correctly pinned on the Shared Tree with his christening source but he has been married to the wrong woman and misplaced geographically in 1881 and 1891.

This will take some sorting out. I hope to offer my “workings” in Confusion Part 2 tomorrow.

PARROTT, Tom, Mother’s Maiden Surname: VICKERS. GRO Reference: 1859 J Quarter in GAINSBOROUGH Volume 07A Page 627.

Abstract 75 · Iron Stone

Seawall, Filey Sands

The Uncertain Future

Sajid Javid, who has taken over as the UK’s Secretary of State of Health from the unwholesome Matthew Hancock, seems certain that Covid restrictions will be lifted next month. He is spinning a fable that the old way of British life will return. He must be mad. Robin Westenra at Seemorerocks considers the lockdown variants planned for most of us in the increasingly uncivilized world.

This morning I began a final survey of St Oswald’s churchyard, with the intention of getting the job done before the world ends. Time for family history research will be limited for a while but I should be able to continue posting a Filey photograph each day.

Measure of Man 57 · Aircraft Carrier

Filey Bay

HMS Queen Elizabeth is currently poking the bear off the coast of Syria.

A Puzzling Mismatch

Fisherman James WYVILL, born in Filey in 1808, was thirty years-old when he married Mary CROMPTON. Over four years passed before their first child, Crompton, appeared in August 1843. Two years later, little Mary paid a brief visit and was followed by James early in 1848. Subsequent events suggest the brothers were close.

“Crump” married Elizabeth Jane FELL on 11 March 1865 and their first child, John William, was born about five weeks later. Two more children arrived before the 1871 census. The children were with their now widowed grandfather James in Queen Street and, it seems, their parents – but their father is given as James.

James would have been 23 in 1871 and older brother Crompton 27. Furthermore, on this census night James had been married to Jane WATKINSON for just five months and they had just welcomed their firstborn, William, into the world.

It appears that the same enumerator visited both households but didn’t notice a mistake had been made.

James junior had a little over nine years of life remaining, until a gale in late October 1880 destroyed the yawl Eliza and all her crew. Jane was a widow for just over four years and then married Crompton – under her birth family name and not as a Wyvill. I wrote about her a couple of years ago in Rachel’s Sister.

Nature Morte 21 · Puffin

Filey Sands

The Elusive John Hartas Lawson

You would think that fellows with unusual middle names would be easy to track and trace in Victorian Britain. Not so.

I have given “our John” a tick of approval because the minimal information attached to him on the Shared Tree is sound. Opening his single source on FamilySearch gives Emma Atkinson and Agnes Ramsden as possible spouses but, fear not…

The couple married in Filey St Oswald’s and the register entry tells us more.

John died less than eighteen months later but I couldn’t find any newspaper reports of his passing.

In 1901, Ann is “living on her own means” at 10 Mitford Street, Filey, with granddaughter Elizabeth. Ten years later at the same address she is described as a lodging house keeper, and a different granddaughter, Everellda, is with her. Helpfully, Ann noted the length of her marriage to Robert Killingbeck on the census form, 21 years, and that she’d had six children with him, of whom three had died. (Elizabeth is the illegitimate daughter of Ada, though she is Elizabeth ALMAND on the Shared Tree. Everillda is the daughter of Robert Tate KILLINGBECK and Christina SELLERS/SELLARS.)

John Hartas’ birth year – 1847 – has been calculated from his given age at death. A search of this year on Free BMD offers eleven boys called John Lawson plus one with a the middle name “Heslin”. This lad, born in Sunderland, was still alive in the twentieth century, so no misspelling involved there. There are sixteen just Johns born in 1846, plus four with middle names that can’t be mistaken for Hartas. None of the birth registration places caught my eye – and knowing his father was a labourer called John is of little assistance.

However, knowing that John Hartas had been married before suggested another strategy. I looked for a John H. marrying in a place of interest and found one in 1866. This is a little too early to be encouraging, but the marriage to either Johanna BENFIELD or Ella SOLOMAN took place in Kensington. At the 1871 census, Robert Killingbeck and Ann were enumerated at different Kensington addresses, Robert at York House Stables, where he worked as a coachman, and Ann at Dukes Lane (with daughter Ada, 1, mother Mary Tate nee HOLLAND, 46, and a nephew, Thomas, aged 2).

It is tantalising to think that Ann and John may have met in Kensington, even as she had more children with Robert, but for this to eventually end in them marrying requires  the wife of John H to follow Robert Killingbeck to the next world before 1889. I have found no evidence of this happening.

I will keep searching but other tasks await. Perhaps you, dear reader, can help.

Landscape 140 · Filey Bay

Cliff path above Muston Sands

Two Days Later

The grave of David Barkley PINDER and his wife Mary Jane nee THOMPSON, by the west wall of St Oswald’s churchyard, is marked by a kerb and is not “photogenic”. But some random connection a few days ago triggered my interest and I needed an image to put on the FamilySearch Tree. I was delighted on Thursday to find the plot adorned with buttercups, herb robert and (I think) sweet woodruff. I wouldn’t mind sleeping eternally under this covering for a few weeks each year.

I happened to pass by the grave yesterday.

I looked on the bright sides – at least the inscriptions on the kerb were visible.

Which grave image would you choose to put as a memory on the Shared Tree?

Flower 24 · Yellow Iris

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Iris pseudacorus, Carr Naze pond.

His Wife, Agnes

Husband One

FamilySearch Shared Tree

Husband Two

Husband Three is Cdr Edmund Henry Outram 1858-1937.

…and of AGNES, his wife, died June 3rd 1939, aged 70.

The grave in St Oswald’s, Filey is sadly undistinguished for a man who was awarded a DSO  for services in the Royal Navy Reserve during the First World War – a rectangle of granite kerb enclosing a patch of packed earth, gravel, grass and weeds.

I described Commander/Captain OUTRAM as an “old sea dog” in an earlier post that introduced the only son he had with Agnes, killed at the age of 21 in that terrible conflict. I mentioned that the family of three was proving difficult to trace but that I would continue searching. It has been a while…

You may have noticed that Cdr Edmund H. Outram, resting eternally in Filey, was born in in the same year as Husband One. The only source attached to Edmund Edward is the 1881 Canada Census and the page image offers just “Edmund” – no middle name or initial. Here is Edmund Henry’s Probate information.

It is beginning to look like another case of mistaken identity, both men seemingly born in Sydney, Cape Breton. The 1859 birth year of Husband One’s Agnes is ten years earlier than that of Edmund Henry’s Agnes – 1869 is indicated by the death registration and Monumental Inscription.. Agnes One’s parents are given as John Young and Jane Wallace Craig on the Shared Tree but there is a source for a two year-old Agnes Young with different parents in the 1871 Canada Census, residing in Sydney…

FamilySearch screenshot

The 1871 census also records a six year-old Agnes Young (Agnes Two?) in Nova Scotia but 400 kms away in Halifax. So, we may have three individuals of each sex, mixed up.

One of the men, Husband Two, died a bachelor. Edmund Healy Outram, Vicar of Ropsley, is single when the 1911 England & Wales Census is taken, and there is no mention of a wife in a newspaper account of his funeral in April 1929. One of the mourners attending the service was a cousin, Edmund Outram. Was it Husband One or Husband Three? See their relationship with Edmund Healy, the unmarried husband, on the Shared Tree.

I have not been able to find a birth registration for young Edmund, whose life ended on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. Father Edmund’s address in 1937 was the same as that noted in the CWGC record – 41 West Avenue.

Photographed yesterday

Agnes downsized to an address nearby, shown on her Probate record.

Photographed this morning

The value of the Effects left by Agnes is about £109,000 in “today’s money”, compared with her husband’s £200,000. This is small beer compared to the value of Great Western Railway shares transmitted by Julia Maclean Outram to Henry Edmund (sic) Outram, Emilia Julia Evenett (widow) and Charles Alexander Outram. £154,893 3s. 0d in 1930 is worth over £7 million now. This shines a melancholy light on the grave plot in Filey churchyard – and upon the thrown away life of young Edmund.

Path 135 · Church Ravine

A Mainstream Media Disconnect

TV News in India recently reported the Modi Government’s plea to social media platforms in the West to remove “Indian Variant” references from their platforms – because it doesn’t exist. Oh, yes it does. In the UK the notorious mutant is more than likely to provide the excuse the UK regime needs to break the promise to release Brits from all lockdown restrictions in three weeks time. The BBC this morning was preparing us for the Great Disappointment.

Unattributed image from today’s UK Column News

A Sense of Belonging

I wrote about John MABBOTT in July 2011. The Looking at Filey blog is still inaccessible at The British Library’s Web Archive so I offer it below, in full, with some comments inserted in square brackets.

The stone has begun a glacial topple from the vertical but its position by the path in the churchyard guarantees that most people passing by will notice John MABBOTT – and perhaps wonder about the “of Filey” beneath the name.

In 1881 the census enumerator caught John with his wife Ruth at 80 Ashton Old Road, Openshaw, his occupation Herbalist & Patent Medicine Dealer. He was 57 years old and Ruth 56. Any children they may have had would have flown the nest.

Ten years later John was in Filey with another wife, Mary Elizabeth, eight years his junior. Checking Free BMD I found that Ruth, born MASON, died about June 1882 in Chorlton Registration District, which includes Openshaw. It would appear that John had no family to keep him in Lancashire because about eighteen months later he married a former Governess, Mary Elizabeth BIRD, in Selby. In 1881 Mary Elizabeth had been staying in Filey with a much older cousin, Mary BIRD, at 14 Hope Street.

Mary BIRD described herself as a ‘proprietress of houses’ at the 1861census and in 1881 as a ‘retired milliner’. Her retirement came to an end a few weeks later and perhaps Mary Elizabeth was a beneficiary of the substantial estate.

In 1882 or ’83, then, there were two bereft and maybe lonely people whose paths unaccountably crossed. Whether it was for love or convenience John and Mary Elizabeth married in Selby and set themselves up in one of cousin Mary’s houses in Filey. They enjoyed almost ten years together. Can we be sure they were happy? I think the “of Filey” is a clue. John seems to have been a wanderer – the 1841 to 1871 censuses might confirm this – but maybe his last years in Filey were his happiest and he asked Mary Elizabeth to let everyone know this by implication on his headstone. It is one thing to feel comfortable in a community though and another to be accepted by it. One wonders if old Filey family tongues wagged disparagingly when they saw the inscription. 

According to the Census John was born in Sleaford, Lincolnshire.  I haven’t found any other sort of record to confirm this but I did happen upon a PDF of burials in that town which prompted an intriguing thought or two. (Well done Sleaford Town Council for making this information freely available on the web.) [The URL for this PDF doesn’t work now.]

The first Mabbott on the list is Alma, aged 0 in 1859 when John was 37. Ruko Inkermann MABBOTT died the following year before reaching his (her?) first birthday. Other tiny Mabbott infants died in 1862, 1865 and 1867. And the father of at least some of these babies was almost certainly a John MABBOTT who married Mary POWDREL (or POWDIEL) on 18th October 1855 (Family Search England Marriages 1538 – 1973 Source Film 989862; Free BMD Dec Q Sleaford 7a 835).

It may not have been Filey’s John though. On the 30th May 1866 another John MABBOTT, born 1822, was buried in Sleaford and there had only been one of these Johns in the town at the1861 census.

Thirteen Mabbott burials are recorded in Sleaford in a hundred years. The modal age is 0, the median 3 and the average just 26 years so our John did very well to reach seventy, though I guess the herbal remedies and patent medicines helped.

After her husband’s death Mary Elizabeth moved back south, close to the places where she was born and married. She died in or near Selby on 22nd June 1915 and although she is remembered on the headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard it isn’t clear that she is actually buried there. [A record of her burial in St Oswald’s churchyard was found later.]

I have put John MABBOTT and his wives on the Filey Tree even though it is unlikely any other family groups will ever connect to them. I think it’s what he would have wanted. I have also opened a Wiki Page for him with blank tables for 1841 to 1871 census information that will help fill the gaps in his life journey.

[The “Filey Tree” was a database briefly hosted by FamilySearch but it disappeared in the major revamp of the Shared Tree some years ago. The “Wiki Page” is no longer easily accessible online. I offered some thoughts on the 1851 census last Friday ( John Mabbott’s First Marriage). In 1861, John “Mobbett” is visiting John BOWNS and family at Earls Terrace, Newton in Makerfield, given age 37, married, working as a Smith, birthplace “Sleaford, Lancashire” in transcription (RG09 2898 f99 p29). On census night ’61, Emma “Mabbott, widow”, age 39, “Cotton L Weaver”, birthplace Manchester, is a lodger at 55 Mulberry Street, Hulme, Chorlton (RG09 2898 f99 p29). In 1871, at West View, Openshaw, John heads a household containing second wife Ruth Mason nee GREEN and two of her three surviving children, Amos (16) and Martha (12). As the eldest, Mary at 19 was possibly in service somewhere in Manchester. (There is a Mary Mason of this age in a Manchester Prison but the receiving ledger gives her birthplace as York.)]

Path 133 · Martin’s Ravine