Kings of Edith

Four years ago I wrote a post about Edith Beaumont BATES. After her death, husband Arthur Travis CLAY paid for the installation of a stained glass window in Filey St Oswald’s Church. Edith, Victorian in dress and hair style, is at the right hand of Jesus.

The Clays of Rastrick indicates my interest in the couple and their children but I didn’t follow through – until yesterday.

Edith has six IDs on the FamilySearch Shared Tree, and Arthur four, but none appear to take us back more than a generation. However, a seemingly trivial connection I made yesterday opened a portal.

One system-generated ID has given Arthur and Edith children but none have attached sources. So I gave a “minimalist Edith” parents to see what might happen.

Nothing much did – until the caret by mother Elizabeth Ledgard’s name was clicked. A trickle of this Elizabeth’s direct descendants soon turned into a flood. A consideable number ruled lands across the length and breadth of Europe for almost two thousand years.

I had wondered about Arthur’s  chutzpah in placing Edith in the company of her Lord. Maybe he knew something.

If you undertake the journey, it will be less frustrating if you start with Elizabeth. How incredible you find it will depend, in part, on what you think of the divine rights of Edith’s kings.

Clay memorial, photographed this morning

Abstract 78 · Ackworth Fresco

Update 18 September

I am not sure how I lost my way yesterday (with the failed link). The line from Edith’s mother [MTCC-DY7] stretches 71 generations to Christ Jesus son of Elohim [G8NL-D9Y]. Go on, be a pilgrim! (You won’t bump into any giants.)

I hope you will make your own way but if you must have a guide…

William Edward Ledgard, Edward Ledgard, Edward Ledgard, Thomas Ledgard, Robert Ledyard, Francis Ledgard, Michael Sheard, William Hepworth, William Hepworth, Henry Hepworth, Sir John Richard Osborn, Sir Peter Osborne, Henry Bourchier, Sir William Bourchier, Thomas of Woodstock, Humphrey de Bohun, Richard FitzAlan, Edmund FitzAlan, Sir Richard Fitzalan, John Fitzalan, John FitzAlan, John Fitzalan (3rd Lord), William “the Crusader”, William d’Aubigny, Sir William d’Aubigny, Lord William d’Aubigny, Roger d’Aubigny, Roger de Mowbray, Yves II, Ivo de Beaumont, Alber I, Gislebert, Henrich I, Otto I, Heinrich von Babenberg, Eberhard, Hludowic, Welf I, Isembert, Warin II, Rurhardus, Hartrad, Eticho Hertzog, Dux Adalrich, Leuthari III, Marcelus, Duc Sabirnis, Maximalus, Duc Lodhandr, Gunzo, Vithicab, Vadomarm Chlodomar, Guindomar, Wadomaire I, Chrocus I, Marcomir V, Childeric I, Sunno Magnus, Chlodomir, King of the Franks Marcomir, Odomir, King of Sicambrian Franks, Ratherius, King Antenor IV, Christ Jesus.

Boomer Bust

Monday’s Frank and Eliza GRICE had nine siblings and the GRO Births Index shares them out to three mothers called Hannah. In chronological order between 1858 and 1881 the digitized sequence of family names runs as follows:-

Bowmer, Boomer, Boomer, Boomer, Bowman, Bowman, Boomer, Bowmer, Bowman, Bowman, Bowman

It isn’t surprising to see confusion on the FamilySearch Shared Tree. First, a minimalist George BOWMAN, future father of Hannah.

There is a more extensive family with this same ID and an “Unknown Wife” as mother to Hannah Bowman.

And now father George with namesake third son. I have included the helpful Blue Hint.

At the 1861 Census, Father George was enumerated at home as “Bowmer” and also at his place of work, Church Cliff Farm, as “Bowman”, a shepherd. Young George Bowman was only listed at the farm as a servant, aged 23 and unmarried. He was a “Boomer” in 1866 when he took Elizabeth TRUMAND for a wife but their three known children were all registered as “Bowman”.

Bowman will be favoured if I’m first to tackle the Shared Tree merges.

Found Object 59 · Old Rope

Grave Mistakes

John Charles is the eldest son of Richard Jesse STEVENSON and Mary Darnton nee HULLOCK, who featured in three short posts earlier this month.

His death was registered in the December Quarter of 1950.

STEVENSON, John Charles, Age at Death (in years): 82. GRO Reference: 1950 D Quarter in BUCKROSE Volume 02A Page 24.

A probate entry gives the date of his passing.

“Margery” (on the birth registration) was the last of twelve children born to John Charles and Eliza nee GRICE. I will connect her to the family HUNTER on the Shared Tree in the next few days.

Eliza is a younger sister to Frank, who made a mistake more terrible than any misguided cut by a monumental mason. (See Two Graces.)

Insect 41 · Common Darter ♀

Wooden bench, Crescent Hill

A Missing Child

When Richard Jesse senior filled out the 1911 Census form, he declared that his wife had borne thirteen children, of whom just one had died. I have added three to those already represented on the Shared Tree, including the accidentally killed George, but the thirteenth is proving elusive.

Photographs of the two stones remembering George, his sister Mary Darnton and their parents can be found here.

Mary was the only girl who didn’t marry. Four brothers and four sisters provided her parents with at least 38 grandchildren. Most appear to be strangers to the Shared Tree so there is much work to be done. I finished putting the twelve children of firstborn John Charles and his wife Eliza on the Tree this afternoon.

Insect 40 · Garden spider

Araneus diadematus

Out of the Workhouse

On Saturday I wrote about the accidental death of young George STEVENSON in 1904. His childhood home was the first house on Foreshore Road, Filey, also referred to as No. 1 The Beach or 1 Beach House.

5 September 2021

This photograph shows the house about ten years after the seawall was built. George’s father, Richard Jesse, was described in the 1901 census as an assistant surveyor and inspector of nuisances, and ten years later as an assistant surveyor and inspector of businesses. In 1851, aged 7, he was enumerated as a pauper inmate in the Boston Workhouse, with younger sister Fanny, 5.

The two children may not have been in the institution for long. They were the youngest of at least nine children born to Willam Stevenson, a Lincolnshire farmer, and Rebecca. William was about thirty-five years old when he married but Rebecca, eleven years younger, died before him in 1847, aged 46. William died in 1850. Their firstborn, also William, had married Eliza ALLEN in 1848 but the couple was clearly unable to give shelter to Richard and Fanny. The other siblings may have found homes with other members of the extended family.

I have not been able to find Fanny in 1861. (She is Frances Charlotte in the GRO Births Index and Charlotte Frances in the Fosdyke Parish Register.) Richard, however, an agricultural labourer now aged eighteen, is enumerated with William and Eliza and their five children. Richard’s birthplace is given as Kirton but he would subsequently offer “Fosdyke”, a parish in the sub-district of Kirton, and both within the Boston Registration District.

At some point in the next seven years, Richard Jesse crossed the Humber and found Mary Darnton HULLOCK. The couple married at Filey St Owald’s on 12 July 1868 and they brought twelve children into the world.

Two generations of Stevensons are scattered around the Shared Tree at the moment. I will attempt to bring them together over the next few days.

Abstract 77 · Seawall

“Tighten My Handlebars”

These may have been the last words spoken by George STEVENSON, 14, on the evening of May 4th 1904. The people gathered by his bedside agreed that, in a brief moment of consciousness before he died, he was addressing an older brother.

In 1901 George was living with his parents, two brothers and two sisters at Number 1, The Beach, Foreshore Road in Filey. He had a job in Hunmanby and was pedalling home from work when he rounded a corner and ran into a pony that was pulling a cart belonging to Joseph DANBY of Old Hall Farm. Francis MALTBY, a labourer, was a passenger in the cart. With a strong following wind, the boy was “going at a fair pace”. Newspaper reports indicate that George was on the wrong side of a road wide enough for two carts. Those final words, uttered most probably to James, 16, suggest a mechanical fault had resulted in the fatal loss of control.

Farmer Danby conveyed George to Filey and a doctor was called. At the inquest, held at the Horse Shoe Inn, Hunmanby…

Dr FORSTER said the shaft of the trap had apparently struck the deceased in the chest, rupturing a lung, and causing other serious injuries, as the skin was not broken, only scraped…

The cycle which deceased had ridden was brought into the room, and showed how fearful the impact was.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death,” exonerating Mr Danby from blame.

The father of the deceased rose and thanked Mr Danby and Dr Forster for the kindness they had shown his boy, and, much affected, Mr Danby deplored the accident.

Hull Daily Mail, 5 May 1904

In 1911, the Stevenson family was living in the same home on Foreshore Road. Henry had married and moved away. Jane had married too but was at the house on census night with her one-year-old daughter, Isabel Stevenson ROBERTS. Older brother Thomas Edward, 33 and single, had moved back in with his parents. Sister Mary Darnton was also unmarried. She is remembered, with George, on the restored stone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Newspaper reports, birth and burial records agree that George was fourteen when he died. Richard Jesse Stevenson noted on the 1911 census form that he had been married 42 years, and that only one of his thirteen children with Mary Darnton HULLOCK had died. Find the family with ten children on the FamilySearch Shared Tree.

Sand 39 · A Fleeting Impression

Filey Sands

The Errors of Our Ways

A couple of days ago, in the process of tidying up a spreadsheet of “Stone People”, I revisited the family of Benjamin Simpson and Ann nee RICHARDSON. I had left them in November 2019 with five children on the FamilySearch Shared Tree and noticed they had been given another child.

The late arrival of a bundle of joy is sometimes described as “a surprise”. That would have been an understatement for Ann, giving birth at age 60 when her youngest son Benjamin junior was 22 years old.

FamilySearch attempts a rescue.

The single source attached to Hannah M is the 1891 Census, which clearly shows her to be the daughter of Ann.

Grandson Benjamin is the third child of Richard Richardson Simpson (the Second) and Christiana BULMER. You may have twigged that Hannah M is his older sister.

SIMPSON, Hannah Maria, Mother’s Maiden Surname: BULMER. GRO Reference: 1878 S Quarter in SCARBOROUGH Volume 09D Page 356.

GRO Births Index

Curiously, the “System” declares there are no Possible Duplicates for Hannah M, but she flourishes elsewhere as Hannah Maria.

The single source for Hannah Maria is the 1881 Census. It correctly identifies her place in the scheme of things and introduces us to younger sister Elizabeth Ann. The source for Lilly of the screenshot is the 1891 household of Charles Bulmer and Rebecca nee ELIOTT. I haven’t found a birth registration for her and suspect she has been mistaken for Elizabeth Ann, who went by “Lizzie” according to a note in Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Hannah Maria married Francis Davidson Forrest GOODWILL in St Mary’s Church, Scarborough, on 19 February 1900. Both died in their fifties, Francis in York in 1930 and Hannah in Scarborough in 1934.

Sea 39 · Swimmer

Filey Bay

Adding Jane

Further searching hasn’t uncovered any vital records online that support the existence of little Jane JENKINSON. who died her infancy and is remembered on the family headstone. (Last Saturday’s post, Over the Target.)

She appears, however, in the comprehensive Filey Jenkinson pedigree in Filey: Fishing, Faith and Family by Irene Allen and Andrew Todd. Published by Blackthorn Press in June this year, it updates and greatly expands Filey: A Yorkshire Fishing Town (1985).

Jane appears in Chart E5 as one of almost eighty descendants of Thomas Jenkinson & Mary CASTLE. She is shown arriving after Mary Elizabeth (1848-1850) and before Mary Ann (1852-1853). I have added her to the FamilySearch Shared Tree, offering 1850 as the year of her birth and death.

Some information on this ‘COLE’ branch was obtained from a family bible reportedly discovered in a cottage awaiting demolition.

A note on Chart E5

I am reluctant to banish ‘Wrong Robert’ without first establishing his parentage. Perhaps someone else will do the dirty work.

Wave 48 · See Creatures?

A Distant Marriage Horizon

I haven’t been calculating the distances young Filey born men and women travelled to find a spouse but would guess the average is not much more than ten miles for both sexes. Henry JOHNSON journeyed almost 300 miles from the Yorkshire coast to find Beatrice Ellen SELLICK. They were married in Bridgwater in 1923. I don’t know if they set up home in Filey shortly afterwards but their son, Bernard Tom Henry, was born here in 1930. The 1939 Register found them living in West Avenue.

Henry and Beatrice are remembered on the broken headstone of Tom Henry Johnson and Mary Ann BULMER.

I have put a photograph of the stone on the FamilySearch Shared Tree and will add a little to the Sellick pedigree tomorrow.

Path 150 · Cleveland Way

Evening moon over Flamborough Head