Centenary

The War Memorial in Murray Street has been given a facelift for the hundredth Remembrance Day. I took a photo on the way home from the supermarket a couple of days ago.

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Mrs Annie CULLEY was given the honour at the Memorial’s unveiling ceremony in 1921. Two of her sons had died in the war.

BrightH_newThe bronze panels have been buffed and some of the blue-green patina has been replaced by brownish tones. Harry BRIGHT was not Filey-born but came to the town before the war and courted a local girl. When the war began he went back to his home area to enlist in the Hunts Cyclists – and the unit was posted to Filey. He has a page on the Wiki, to which I’ll add some of the information I’ve turned up this week.

Harry was already on the FamilySearch Tree but is still without his wife and son. One curious aspect of his brief service details on the CWGC website is the absence of any mention of parents or spouse. If you read the Wiki entry you’ll see that I’m not completely certain I have the right man. But Harry from Huntingdon came from a large family, and after his father died young his mother married a widower. At the 1911 census, Harry was in a household with five half and four full brothers and sisters.

Harry’s widow remarried too and had five children with John William HOLMES. She died aged 43 (or 44) and is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Note: The link to the CWGC website is throwing up run-time errors, possibly a temporary glitch but I’ve removed it. If you are interested, search for Harry Bright 20702, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

When Henry Robert Field CANHAM filled out the 1911 Census form in The Vicarage, Muston, he noted his marriage of 33 years and the production of 11 children with Emma Maria née JAMES, three of whom had died. Three unmarried daughters were resident at the Vicarage, Mary Lilian, 27, Maybell Beatrice Constance, 21, and Ellen Mary, 15.

Ten years earlier, Reverend Henry was away from home, enjoying a busman’s holiday at Hackthorn Vicarage in Lincolnshire, 45 miles from his responsibilities in Bourne, where 9 of his eleven children came into the world. Emma Maria headed the household in the Villa Brunne, in the company of son Ernest G, and daughters Lilian M, Mary B and Ellen M.

Mary B is clearly enumerated as a CANHAM but I can’t find a birth registration for her. She would be the twelfth child if born to the Vicar and his wife. As a result of her appearance in this Census, she has a place in the family on the FamilySearch Tree.

“Lilian Mary” is 7 at the 1891 Census but was registered at birth as Mary Lilian. She is Lilian Mary in the GRO Death Index and Mary Lilian on her headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard. It would appear that she lived most of her life with her dear sister, Ellen Mary – witness the touching “reunited” on the stone.

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The pedigree of “Mary B” remains a mystery. My guess is that she may have been a “waif and stray” taken into the Canham family, formally adopted perhaps and her birth surname changed.

At the time of his induction as Rector of Hatch Beauchamp in Somerset, Ernest Grey CANHAM, older brother of contrary Mary Lilian, told the gathering he could trace his family tree back to the time of Edward III. Contributors to FamilySearch haven’t managed to take the direct male line quite that far, but other branches lead to Welsh Lords and Ladies, and to 5th century Kings of the Franks and Burgundy.

I have found just one mark of the existence of the true Marys in Muston and Filey. From October 1917 to March 1919, Ellen worked 1,940 hours for a shilling a day in the kitchens of the British Red Cross VAD Hospital in Filey.

I think the hospital was located in Osborne House on The Crescent but have been unable to confirm this. Find more information about Voluntary Aid Detachment Hospitals here.

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Osborne House (left), The Crescent, Filey

Dying in Harness, Drowning in the Med

I have been doing more research into the three wives of William MOORE. In passing, I had noticed some references to a Nurse Catherine NICHOLSON who had served with some distinction in hospitals on the Western Front. I imagined William’s third wife undertaking those terrible duties. There seemed to be a couple of Nurse Catherines but they were, I think, Home Counties or Scots women.

William’s Catherine was the fifth of ten children born to Edward NICHOLSON and Annie McCORMICK between 1870 and 1889. By the time the 1911 Census was taken, five of the children had died. About a year after she married William, Catherine’s younger brother lost his life while serving with the 1st/4th Bn, Cheshire Regiment. I was initially puzzled that he died at sea but a look down the list of fatalities on 4 May 1917 provided a partial answer.

85734 Private JOHN PERCY MULLINEUX      Royal Army Medical Corps

TF/202635 Private GEORGE NAYLOR MUMBY   4th Bn. Royal Sussex Regiment

55989 Private PATRICK MURPHY    Royal Army Medical Corps

M/273823 Private CHARLES WILLIAM MURRELL        906th M.T. Coy. Army Service Corps

Captain RICHARD OWEN NELSON     Army Service Corps

36336 Private JOHN HENRY NICHOLSON      1st/4th Bn. Cheshire Regiment  

63192 Private JOHN NISBET       Royal Army Medical Corps

Second Lieutenant CLAUD NORIE-MILLER    Army Service Corps

53628 Serjeant WILLIAM HENRY NORMAN     Royal Army Medical Corps

48050 Private CHRISTMAS GEORGE NORTHAM  1st/5th Bn. Welsh Regiment

70481 Private JOHN NOUTCH       Royal Army Medical Corps

 

There are 274 men who died this day and are remembered on the Savona Memorial in Italy. The bodies of a further 82 were recovered and are buried in the Savona Town Cemetery. They were not all fighting men. In the cemetery lies Barber THOMAS BONAR CHERRY of the S.S. Transylvania Mercantile Marine Reserve.

Transylvania

They were bound for Salonika, or onward to Egypt, and their grand troopship was sunk by torpedo off the Italian coast near Genoa. About four hundred drowned but over 2,000 were rescued, the majority by two (allied) Japanese destroyers.

One of those rescued, Walter Edward WILLIAMS of Weston super Mare,, was interviewed many years later and he tells his story of the sinking on Reel 2 (of 5) here. Searching for SS Transylvania online will raise more accounts of this event.

From the Nicholsons, I moved on to the family of William’s first wife, Annie Elizabeth COWAN. Tracing the origins of her father proved to be an engaging and enjoyable challenge. Thomas Albert began his life as a COWIN in Lonan Parish on the Isle of Man but ended it as a COWAN in Dalton in Furness, Lancashire 74 or 75 years later.

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1911 Census Form

His record on FamilySearch Tree has a link to an obituary published in Manx Quarterly #20. Here is an extract: –

The Barrow Guardian of December 9th had the following reference to the death of Councillor Cowan:-“Died in harness! This expression was never more fully realised locally than by the passing away of Councillor Thomas Albert Cowan, of Dalton, a man full of years and honour. At the time he was attacked by a sudden illness he was on his way to Barrow to fulfil a promised preaching appointment for a minister who was ill. It is quite true and appropriate to repeat what a friend of Mr Cowan’s said to me on Sunday evening: ‘He was taken when doing his Master’s work.’ And he was never happier than when performing some religious duty; it was ingrained in him. He had spent over 50 years as a local preacher and religious teacher; then for more than 25 years he was associated with the local Board and Urban Council, for 21 years a member of the Gas Committee, some years on the Education Authority and Burial Board, and one of the trustees of the Billincoat Charity. Truly he was a marvellous man. If he could do a good turn to anybody he was only too willing to give his services. As a speaker he was fearless, impassioned and convincing, hence his success in the early days of Nonconformity in the Furness district, when he fought tenaciously for the rights and privileges of his fellow dissenting citizens. I repeat he was a wonderful character, and could turn his hand to many things besides mining, religious work and temperance work. Where he will be most missed, however, next to his own home, will be in the Primitive Methodist Church, for here he was ever first and foremost, and none will ever know what he did and what he gave to his loved Bethel. We mourn the loss to-day of one of God’s noblemen.”

Frederick II and Prince Eugene

William LORRIMAN and Sarah BUCKLE named their third son Frederick but the little chap only just reached his first birthday. So, four years later, they named their fifth son Frederick. At the turn of the century, Fred faced a portrait studio’s camera and sent a number of the resulting cartes-de-visite to relatives, of which at least one survives.

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Photographer unknown, courtesy Brenda Pritchard

As a young man, he seems to have chosen to become a career sailor in the Royal Navy, retiring, owing to ill-health, near the end of the First World War. One of the sources offering information about his service says he died “of disease”. There is no indication that he succumbed to the Influenza Pandemic, which didn’t really get a hold in continental Europe until shortly after his death. Fred is buried in Gillingham, not far from the family home in Chatham.

Grave of Frederick Lorriman_s

Frederick’s final posting had been to HMS Prince Eugene, a Lord Clive Class Monitor launched in 1915.

Mary Rebecca married again about nine years after Fred’s death, when their daughter Ivy would have been 19, and died aged 72 in 1953.

Find Fred on FamilySearch Tree.

 

 

Delville Wood

I haven’t been able to establish exactly when and where Tom CHAPMAN sustained the wounds from which he died, on this day 1916. He was serving in the 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment and the following extract from a snowdenhouse article places him at Longueval four days earlier.

On the 23rd a joint operation by the 3rd and 5th Divisions was put into action. Both Divisions attacked from the west of Longueval with the 3rd Division on the right and the 5th Division on the left. At 3:40 am the 1st Northumberland Fusiliers advanced followed by the 13th Kings and 12th West Yorks. They made good progress advancing through the northern part of Longueval and into Delville Wood itself, until they came up against heavy machine-gun fire from the front and left. They were forced to fall back at first to Piccadilly Street and then to Pont Street. Two other battalions captured a German strong point close to the Orchard in the north of the village but after being heavy counter attacked they were also forced to retire.

“Piccadilly Street” is the road north out of the village, so I think Tom may have fallen in the area circled on the Google Earth satellite image below.

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He was taken to a nearby casualty receiving station and then, perhaps, moved to a hospital where he died.

The Battle for Delville Wood was a bitterly fought affair and South African units particularly suffered enormous casualties. Graham Leslie McCallum writes about his grandfather’s experiences on the Western Front here. Scroll down until you see photographs of Longueval and Delville, which may change the pictures you have in your mind of a French village and wood in summer.

Tom was buried in La Neuville British Cemetery, Corbie, which is about 30 km west of Longueval. He is remembered on a family grave in St Oswald’s; he has the left-hand kerb and older brother Frank the right.

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Memories of FRANK CHAPMAN, died 28 Dec 1926, aged 38.

And TOM CHAPMAN, died of wounds in France, 27 July 1916, aged 20.

Tom is on the FamilySearch Tree.

Remembering Jenkinson Haxby

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission record states that Jenkinson died on the 7th July 1916. His body was not recovered for burial and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial with 1,463 others. I’ve looked carefully down the list and he is the only casualty serving with the 2nd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment.

He is also remembered on the headstone of his grandparents, Matthew and Jane HAXBY in St Oswald’s churchyard but the inscription records his death on the 8th. Only 354 deaths are recorded on the Thiepval Memorial for that day but there are a number of men from the 2nd Bn Yorkshires. I haven’t been able to establish where Jenkinson was killed but after several days of little action in the Battle of Albert the attempt to capture Trônes Wood began on the 8th, so maybe that is where and when he fell with some of his brothers in arms.

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And their beloved grandson L/C JENKINSON HAXBY, 2nd Yorks. Regt., killed in action July 8th 1916, aged 23.

‘Wars bitter cost, a dear one missed.’

(On the Memorial Plaque in St Oswald’s, Jenkinson is among Filey men who died in 1917 and is recorded as serving with the West Yorkshire Regiment.)

I did some work today on his father’s birth family but not enough to put Jenkinson or his mother Elizabeth Ann JENKINSON on the FamilySearch Tree. Grandfather Matthew HAXBY 1834 – 1902.