‘Trio’ Again

A year ago I wrote about the loss of six Filey fishermen from the yawl Trio, off Spurn Point. I said that the only man not remembered in the churchyard was also absent from the FamilySearch Tree. He was there, but masquerading as the son of William and Ann TAIT.

Ann had given birth to her first child in 1834 and her ninth, and last, twenty years later, when she was aged about 44. It was possibly a misunderstanding that caused the enumerator in 1871 to add Robert to her roster, though she would have then been about 54 at the time of his birth.

Robert was the illegitimate son of William and Ann’s eldest daughter, Rachel, but only a few weeks after he was baptised she married Charles VEARY. Whether or not he was the boy’s biological father, Charles accepted him as his own.

Charles and Rachel seem to have had just one child in marriage, John William.

I think I have set the records straight on FST, though there is more information to add. Find the unfortunate Robert here. If you go to the pedigree you will see that Charles is a WILLIS. He seems to have adopted this surname shortly after he married. The GRO Index gives his “bachelor name” as Charles Willas VEARY. Filey Genealogy & Connections shows him to be the illegitimate son of Susannah VAREY. His sister, Sarah (Varey) WILLIS married Filey fisherman and boat owner William HUNTER. They had eleven children together and the name Varey (usually in parentheses) is occasionally met on the community tree. I have no idea who the original “Willis” may have been.

Fishing for Hoppers

The first HOPPER in the Filey Census is widowed fisherman Timothy, age 75 and heading a King Street household in 1841containing five people I have classified as boarders/lodgers – four members of a WILLIS family and a widow, Fanny MORGAN. In 1861, Bridlington born Robert Hopper, sailmaker, is living in Hope Street with his wife Annie Elizabeth, three children and Annie’s sister Susan “BERRYMAN”. In Filey Genealogy & Connections there is a gathering of Patrington Hoppers. The connection of these folk to Filey isn’t immediately clear but their descendants increased greatly and scattered. You can follow them, some to the United States (in the 21st century) on FamilySearch Tree, starting from William and Mary Ann née FEWSON.

There is only one Hopper remembered in St Oswald’s churchyard but the first headstone of 2019 to which I’ve turned my attention has seen me dancing around other Hoppers for much of the day.

a32_johnsonthosh_20120819_fst

Thomas Holmes JOHNSON doesn’t appear to have representation on FST, neither does his father, or grandfather Frederick HOPPER. Frederick, a fisherman and lifeboatman, was born in Hull but enumerated in Easington in 1861 so I’m expecting to connect him to the Patrington branch. If I am to tag the above headstone photo on FST I will probably need to bring a large troupe of Hoppers together on the World Tree. It may take some time.

(Until this afternoon I didn’t know that you really fish WITH hoppers. It is a variety of dry fly that bamboozles trout.)

Out at Sea

Four big lights on Alfa Italia cut through the murk late this afternoon.  Sarpen and Thornbury remain at anchor in Bridlington Bay and a few miles further south two more tankers, Delta Star and Baltic Favour are awaiting orders. When I checked Ship AIS at lunchtime I noticed Happy Pelican was making good speed to Grangemouth and had to smile, its filthy cargo of LPG notwithstanding.

Down Under

Radio NZ reported yesterday that 2018 was the hottest year since New Zealand records began.

Veteran climate scientist Jim Salinger has calculated the mean annual land surface temperature in 2018 was 13.5 degrees Celsius, which was 0.85C above the 1981-2010 average.

This was “a smidgeon” hotter than the previous warmest year on record, 2016, which was 0.84C above normal.

January, March, July and December were all at least 1C above normal, with January being a massive 3.2C above average, the hottest month ever.

Overall, the country has heated up by 1.3C since records began in 1867, Prof Salinger said.

Read the article here.

I checked the Wellington International temperature data downloaded from Weather Underground and found that the capital’s 2018 was the hottest of the last ten years, and just 0.05°C warmer than 2016. A smidgeon. The Wellington average annual temperature was, as you might expect, higher than the national figure, at 14.25°C. Auckland would no doubt be warmer still, and Invercargill cooler. What will 2019 be like?

A Net Loss

The yawl Admiral Hope was built in Scarborough in 1859 by Robert SKELTON. Registered as SH79, her owners are listed in Captain Syd’s database as John SETTERINGTON and Newman ELDERS, farmers from Hunmanby and Filey. The only skipper named is Castle JENKINSON.

In 1867, while fishing for herring in the North Sea, Admiral Hope’s nets were cut by a passing ship and the loss, in today’s money, amounted to about £25,000.

1867_JENKINSONcastleNETS_NEWS

Admiral Hope was broken up in December 1880 and this may have prompted Castle to give the sea shortly afterwards. The census enumerator stated his occupation as “Fisherman” on 3 April 1881 but about three weeks later Castle stood before the magistrates at Bridlington Petty Sessions as a grocer, “charged with having a pair of small scales quarter of an ounce short”. He was fined 5 shillings plus 7 shillings costs, about £56 today. He died 10 months later, aged 59. His wife Mary followed him to the grave a year later. I put a photograph of their headstone on FamilySearch Tree today.

‘Pride of Filey’

The steam drifter SH215 Pride of Filey was built in 1907 in Portnockie on the Moray Firth. Originally named Emulator and registered in Banff (BF64), she was sold to Thomas WHITEHEAD of Scarborough on 29 November 1913. Her first three skippers were Isaac ROSS, William SAYERS, and J. W. CRAWFORD. The Admiralty requisitioned her for war service between 1914, and 1918 and in 1921 she was sold to Hull and renamed Cuhona (H307). (Source: Captain Sydney Smith’s database.)

On the 25th July 1914 one of her crew, Filey man Thomas William “Crow” JENKINSON, suffered a fractured skull while fishing. The vessel returned to port immediately but Thomas died in hospital before the end of the day. He was 50 years old, survived by his wife Frances Haxby née COWLING and eight of their ten children. You can find an as yet limited version of his pedigree on FamilySearch Tree.

1914_JENKINSONthoswm_NEWS

A Filey Shepherd

There were several farms in and around Filey in the 19th century but I don’t think any raised sheep. When Filey Fields Farm went under the hammer in the early 1930s the byres, sheds, and pens were for cattle only. So, any young Filey man wanting to work with sheep had to leave the town.

Robert CAPPLEMAN was born into a fishing family. Two brothers, Thomas and “Jack Wraxer”, negotiated the dangers of this dangerous occupation, as did the father, John Pockley CAPPLEMAN. Robert’s youngest brother, Stephenson, died a soldier in South Africa (see the post Three Soldiers, 30 May).

Robert began his working life as a fisherman. The 1881 census captures him aged 14 following in his dad’s wake. Ten years later he was a servant on Greenhills Farm near Pickering and the following year he married Mary Hannah BERRIMAN from East Lutton. The couple had five children in the first twelve years of married life, as they moved from farm to farm on the Yorkshire Wolds. The last two children, though, were born in Beswick, in 1902 and 1904. Thirty-five years later, Robert was recorded in the 1939 Register in Beswick, aged 72, and still working as a shepherd. His death was registered in December Quarter 1952 in Holderness District, which includes Beswick within its boundaries.

By chance, my bed-time Kindle reading at the moment is Wild Life in a Southern County. I have a copy of the book, picked up at Winchester Market for 25 pence in 1978, about a hundred years after it was published. In Chapter V, Richard Jefferies has this to say about shepherds:-

If any labourers deserve to be paid well, it is the shepherds: upon their knowledge and fidelity the principal profit of a whole season depends on so many farms. On the bleak hills in lambing time the greatest care is necessary; and the fold, situated in a hollow if possible, with the down rising on the east or north, is built as it werer of straw walls, thick and warm, which the sheep soon make hollow inside, and this have a cave in which to nestle.

The shepherd has a distinct individuality, and is generally a much more observant man in his own sphere than the ordinary labourer. He knows every single field in the whole parish, what kind of weather best suits its soil, and can tell you without going within sight of a given farm pretty much what condition it will be found in. Knowledge of this character may seem trivial to those whose days are passed indoors; yet it is something to recollect all the endless fields in several square miles of country. As a student remembers for years the type and paper, the breadth of the margin – can see, as it were, before his eyes the bevel of the binding and hear again the rustle of the stiff leaves of some tall volume which he found in a forgotten corner of a library, and bent over with such delight, heedless of dust and “silverfish” and the gathered odour of years – so the shepherd recalls his books, the fields; for he, in the nature of things, has to linger over them and study every letter: sheep are slow.

When the hedges are grubbed and the grass grows where the hawthorn flowered, still the shepherd can point out to you where the trees stood – here an oak and here an ash. On the hills he has often little to do but ponder deeply, sitting on the turf of the slope, while the sheep graze in the hollow, waiting for hours as they eat their way. Therefore by degrees a habit of observation grows upon him – always in reference to his charge: and if he walks across the parish off duty he still cannot choose but notice how the crops are coming on, and where there is most “keep”. The shepherd has been the last of all to abandon the old custom of long service. While the labourers are restless,there may still be found not a few instances of shepherds whose whole lives have been spent upon one farm. Thus, from the habit of observation and the lapse of years, they often become local authorities; and when a dispute of boundaries or water rights or right of way arises, the question is frequently finally decided by the evidence of such a man.

20170620StMargaretsBeswick
St Margaret’s, Beswick, 20 June 2017

Robert’s pedigree on FST is a work in progress. On FG&C he has a “guesswork wife” but his ancestors may be usefully compared with those on the World Tree.

Today’s Image

Two days after the patriotic beach scene was recorded, England was beaten 2 – 1 by Italy in the first group match of the 2014 Fifa World Cup in Brazil. A few days later, Uruguay defeated our lads by the same score. I remember nothing about the third match. A goalless draw with Costa Rica meant an ignominious exit by England in the group stage. National pride this year is at the feet of a relatively young bunch of multi-millionaires. They should do better than the faded “golden generation” last time out. I just hope our traveling supporters have a good time in Russia and come home with a different narrative about the Federation than the shameful one peddled by the United Kingdom regime these past few years.

Yawl ‘Dorothy’

Captain Syd has Dorothy in his database, registered as SH 142, and built in Scarborough by T. W. Walker in 1883. She was 63’7 long, lute stern, weighed 44 tons and worked out of Hull initially (H1348) before being brought “home” in 1891.  Her first Scarborough owner was fisherman William MENNELL. The vessel passed through several sets of co-owners and numerous skippers, though only five of the latter are listed. She was broken up in April 1905.

In late April 1902, she brought melancholy news to Scarborough that one of the six crew, John COLLING, had died in his sleep as Dorothy sailed from the Dogger to Grimsby with her catch.

1902_COLLINGjohnDeath_NEWS

John was 28 years old and his widow, Elizabeth Ann née WILLIS, a year younger. Betsy Jenkinson Colling was born twelve or so hours after her father died. As she grew older she would surely have been told about Thomas Cammish Willis COLLING, a younger brother who had lived for just 5 months in 1900.

Elizabeth Ann did not marry again and died in 1961 aged 86.

Betsy married Thomas Robert CRIMLISK, known as “Tommy A” (to distinguish him from Tommies B and C), and lived to the equally grand age of 85.

I put John on FST a few weeks ago and added Elizabeth Ann and the children today. John was one of 13 children and, although two siblings died as infants, two others easily passed their biblical span, four reached their eighties and three celebrated their 90th birthdays.

G669_COLLINGjohn_20120807_fst

In loving memory of JOHN COLLING, the beloved husband of ELIZABETH A. COLLING, who died at sea on the yawl ‘Dorothy’, April 26 1902, aged 28 years.

‘They sleep in Jesus free from pain

Our loss though great to them is gain

Beloved by all who knew them here

And to their kindred none more dear

Yet hope through Jesu’s death is given

That soon we meet with them in Heaven.’

THOMAS C. W. COLLING their beloved child who died Dec 20 1901 aged 5 months.

Also the above named ELIZABETH ANN who died Jany. 20 1961 aged 86 years.

‘In Heavenly love abiding’

Scottow · Scotter

Mark SCOTTOW was baptized this day, 1854, in Runton, Norfolk. In August 1917 Mark SCOTTER was “killed by enemy submarine”.

G448_SCOTTERalice_20170423_fst

The origins of surnames are often fancifully explained on websites that hope to sell you parchments but I found one today that suggested SCOTTOW derived from a village of that name in Mark’s birth county. It also pointed out that there was a village in Lincolnshire called SCOTTER.

Ancestry has re-designed the surname distribution maps it freely provides online.

1891_ScotterFamilies_Ancestry

Taken at face value, this map shows a Norfolk heartland and zero Scotters in Lincolnshire, so if one accepts the morphing of Mark’s surname in his lifetime, the Scottow theory looks good.

Mark was part of the Norfolk Scottow/Scotter diaspora to the Yorkshire coast and the above map doesn’t register the seven Scotter families in Filey in 1891. If you read the small print, though, you will see that Yorkshire has 42% of Scotter families in England and Wales in that census year. We need a more accurate map.

SCOTTOW is ranked =206 in Filey surnames with 23 males and 6 females.

SCOTTER is ranked =25 with 93 males and 85 females.

These are “unique individuals” in Kath’s Filey Genealogy & Connections database, not people counted several times in census returns.

I counted the birth registrations in the districts containing Scottow, Norfolk and Scotter, Lincolnshire in three decades, 1851-60, 1871-80 and 1901-1910, and in Scarborough Registration District.

There were no Scottows or Scotters registered in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire over those 30 years.

Thirteen Scottow births were registered in Erpingham, Norfolk in the first decade and none in the last.  There was one Scottow birth in Scarborough between 1851 and 1860 and three in the last decade.

For Scotter the count for the three decades in Erpingham was 5, 8 and 4.

For Scarborough, it was 4, 23 and 22.

This is a rather sketchy statistical analysis but it seems to confirm the growing acceptance of Scotter over the “original” Scottow – and the migration of Norfolk fisher families to the Yorkshire coast.

In 2011, David Scotter wrote three articles about the diaspora for Looking at Filey. You can learn more about Mark here.

Mark on FST.