Yawl ‘Trio’

SH76 Trio was built by Robert SKELTON in Scarborough in 1859. Her first owners were three of the TINDALL family, Alexander, William and James; shipbuilder, sailmaker, and banker respectively. The last change of ownership noted by Captain Syd was in 1881, four Scarborough fishermen, Robert ALLEN senior & junior, James and John ALLEN, took possession. At some point thereafter Thomas Avery JOHNSON became skipper and he was aboard with two of his sons in 1895 when a gale blew up in the North Sea, off Spurn Point. The crew on a passing  Hull boat saw three of Trio’s fishermen washed overboard by a huge wave but could do nothing to effect a rescue.

The six men on board Trio were all from Filey and a pall fell over the town when news of her difficulties was received.

British Armed Forces and Overseas Deaths and Burials (The National Archives) gives 14 May as the date of the men’s demise. Five are remembered on headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard. Two are recorded as having been lost in the gale of 16 and 17 May, and the three JOHNSONs as having drowned on the 16th.

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Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN
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Francis CAMMISH
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Thomas Avery, Francis Cappleman, and William JOHNSON

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Cappleman, M (Wiggy) 1891‘Matty Wiggy’ CAPPLEMAN played for the Filey Red Stars FC and was photographed with the team in 1891 when he was 18-years-old. The insurance money from the benefit clubs was supplemented by local fund-raising events. The following was noted in The Scarborough Mercury on Friday 30th August 1895.

Dr. Spark, the Leeds City Organist, gave a very charming recital at Filey Church on Monday for the benefit of the widows and orphans of the fishermen lost in the Trio. The collection realized between £5 and £6. The programme was com­posed of some of the choicest illustrations of the gems of Silas, Tours, Mendelssohn, and Gounod, and Dr. Spark gave two or three of his own com­positions, which were very much appreciated. “The Vesper Hymn” and the finale introducing national themes by Purcell, Arne, and Dr. Bull afforded the veteran musician an opportunity of showing his wonderful skill as an executant and of displaying the passion and dramatic instinct which have always characterized his playing.

There were only two of the lost six on FamilySearch Tree when I looked a few days ago and in the process of gathering in the others I ran into some difficulties. I had hoped to point you to more complete pedigrees!

Francis Cappleman JOHNSON

Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN

Robert EDMOND was the member of the crew without a remembrance in the churchyard – and he isn’t represented yet on FST. Find him on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Dr. SPARK, a Devon man, makes a couple of appearances on FST – but as an only child without a mother. At the 1881 Census, he was living in Eccleshill, Bradford, with wife Elizabeth and son Thomas, age 23 and a law student. William Spark died in Leeds less than two years after his Filey recital.

[S. S.] Wesley’s articled pupil from his Exeter days, William Spark (1823-97) went with him to Leeds where he became Organist of St. George’s and then, after designing the Town Hall organ, Borough Organist from 1859 to 1897. His brother Frederick was a guiding light of the Leeds Triennial Festival and William played at each Festival between 1874 and 1886. Grove’s Dictionary dismisses his compositions as “numerous but unimportant”. Unimportant or not, they were nevertheless widely performed. His oratorio Immanuel figured in the Leeds Festival of 1877 and Spark’s recitals in and around Doncaster in the 1870s and 1880s (he appeared in the town as early as February 1853, conducting thirty voices of his own Leeds Madrigal and Motet Society) included his Concertstuck, a Fantasie and (several times) Variations and Fugue on Jerusalem the Golden, also solo songs and excerpts from Immanuel. Spark’s Yorkshire Exhibition March was written in 1875 for the grand organ in the Exhibition building. He wrote and lectured tirelessly, his lecture subjects in Doncaster at that same period including “The Vocal Music of the Victorian Era“, “The Minstrelsy of Old England“, “National Ballad Music of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales” and “Glees and Partsongs“, the illustrations for the latter talk including at least one of his own compositions. He edited books of music by others for organists to play.

Source.

Herring Coble ‘Unity’

The Driffield Times reported on 30 April 1892:-

After having enjoyed spring-like weather for a little while, an unwelcome change took place on Wednesday morning [27th], when it rained and blew incessantly. The weather and wind having changed toward evening, it being fine and pleasant, some of our fishing craft ventured to the fishing ground, and had already got a great many miles from land, when a sudden gale sprung up about four the next morning, a strong north wind blowing accompanied by heavy seas.

The small boats and a couple of larger herring cobles turned for home as soon as the weather “looked treacherous”. Two of the vessels needed the assistance of the lifeboat to get home safely. The skipper of Tally Ho! reported that they had been in the company of a third herring coble and great concern was shown for its crew. The boat was still missing on the morning of Friday (29th).

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SH87 Unity was  ­40 feet long and weighed 20 tons. Although described above as a Scarborough boat, Captain Syd notes that Thomas COWLING of Filey shared ownership with  John REYNOLDS and Arthur Harrison SELLERS. The database gives the lost-with-all hands-date as 25th April but that may be my digitization error! The official Overseas Deaths and Burials record gives the 28th April and this date appears on the headstone of John and Richard’s parents.

Unity

Also of JOHN AND RICHARD, sons of the above, & EDMUND ROSS JENKINSON, son-in-law, who were lost at sea, April 28th 1892, aged 36, 34 and 30 years.

‘In the midst of life we are in death.’

You can easily navigate to the three men on Filey Genealogy & Connections, from John CAMMISH senior.

Bean, G 1891George BEAN was an incomer to Filey, born in one of the Hecks (Great or Little), near Selby. He is on FG&C but I suspect he has been given the wrong mother there.  You can see, though, that his father in law is ‘Unity Jack’ CRIMLISK, after whom the doomed herring coble was presumably named. The image of him (left) was taken in 1891 in his guise of Treasurer of Filey Red Stars Football Club.

SH140 Tally Ho!, mentioned in the Driffield Times report, was lost in Filey Bay on 8th December 1892.

Coble ‘Annie’

Filey Bay was a millpond this morning. Ninety-nine years ago it claimed two lives.

Three men in the coble Annie were returning from the crabbing grounds at about 10.30 am when the tideway, racing strongly round the end of Filey Brigg, tipped them over. The youngest of the three at age 27, John LANE, who had only just been demobilized, clung to the upturned boat and was rescued by Richard Cammish JENKINSON in the coble Sunstar. Matthew Jenkinson CAMMISH, 65,  and Mortimer SCALES, 42, were swept away and their bodies never found.

The drama had been watched from the shore by helpless local folk and early season visitors. Everyone’s thoughts must have turned to the loss of seven Filey men from the drifter Emulator the previous week.

Matthew isn’t represented on FamilySearch Tree but you can find his pedigree on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

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Mortimer SCALES has a pedigree on FST that varies somewhat from FG&C. If each is carefully checked and verified they can possibly be merged without too much difficulty.

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I haven’t yet been able to trace the rescued John LANE.

The Yawl ‘Ebenezer’

Captain Syd Smith’s database offers six fishing vessels named Ebenezer but only one yawl, registered as SH30, official number 14911. She was built in Scarborough in 1856 and was only three years old when she lost three of her crew. The Yorkshire Gazette of 9th April reported the tragedy.

Fatal Calamity at Sea

A deep gloom has been spread over Filey for the last few days, owing to the melancholy intelligence having been received on Saturday last that three fishermen, named Francis Haxby, William Sayers and Edmond Sayers, the two latter of whom were brothers, had met with a watery grave. This sad event occurred about four o’clock in the afternoon of Friday, the 1st inst., 30 miles distant from Flamborough Head. The particulars, so far as can be ascertained, are as follows:- The way in which fishing is carried on here, at this season of the year, is by proceeding out to sea a great distance, perhaps 50 miles, in large decked boats called yawls, manned with a crew of eight men. On reaching the fishing ground, two smaller boats called cobles, which are carried on the deck, are launched, three men getting into each. From these smaller boats the lines are put out, and will often extend for miles in length. The lines are taken in after a few hours, the cobles remaining attached to them. It was at this juncture the accident happened. There was a strong gale of wind blowing from the south-west, which, at this distance from the shore, brings on a dangerous sea. The yawl had broken its fore-yard, and whether the men in the coble had been directing their attention to this circumstance, not sufficiently regardful of their own perils, or from whatever other cause, must remain a mystery; but, sad to relate, on proceeding to the spot, nothing could be seen of the men,  –  the coble was there, and full of water. It is supposed a heavy sea had broken into her, or upset her, and that the coble had afterwards righted herself, – the poor fellows having been thrown out. It is to be regretted that the fishermen do not provide themselves with “life-belts,” to put on when following their dangerous calling; had these men had them their lives would probably have been saved. Edmond Sayers was an excellent swimmer, but this could be of little avail, encumbered as they are with clothing and heavy sea boots. William and Edmond Sayers are unmarried; Francis Haxby has left a wife and three young children. His widow will be entitled to some relief from the Shipwrecked Fishermen and Mariners Royal Benevolent Society, he having been a member of that noble institution. The bodies have not been recovered. The coble, too, and all the lines were lost.

Francis was part owner of Ebenezer, with his brother Jenkinson, Robert JENKINSON and Francis CRAWFORD. Jenkinson HAXBY skippered the boat. The vessel was transferred to Hull in the summer of 1876 and re-registered as H1228.

Francis is remembered on his parents’ headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, and on the stone below, which also names his wife, Susannah, and a fourth child, Mary, who died aged 5 years and 6 months, a year and a half before her father. Francis junior, the couple’s youngest child born in the spring of 1857, would drown from Eliza in October 1880.

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Francis and the Sayers brothers on FamilySearch Tree.

FV ‘Joan Margaret’

It is thought that HMT D. V. Fitzgerald triggered an enemy mine in the River Humber on this day, 1941. The explosion sank the motor fishing boat Joan Margaret, and the herring drifter Gloaming, with the loss of eight lives.

There are two posts about this event on the archived Looking at Filey:-

‘Joan Margaret’

‘Joan Margaret’ Revisited

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‘Joan Margaret’ about 1934, Grimsby New Fish Dock, courtesy Martin Douglas

Wreck Site gives the location of the event, details about the vessels and their crews. Joan Margaret, Gloaming.

Below is a list of those killed with links to their Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) web pages and, for the Filey men, links to their pedigrees on Filey Genealogy and Connections (FG&C). At the time of writing, only George WILLIS can be found on FamilySearch Tree. (I haven’t looked for the Gloaming men on FST.)

 

Richard HAXBY, CWGC, FG&C

Thomas Edmond PEARSON, CWGC, FG&C

George Robert PEARSON, CWGC, FG&C

John William POWLEY, CWGC, FG&C

George WILLIS, CWGC, FG&C, FST

Charles A. LITTLE, CWGC

William S. REDGRAVE, CWGC

Robert SWANN, CWGC

The Storm and Jacky Windy

The gales of 6th and 7th March 1883 caused the deaths of at least seven Filey fishermen. Five drowned from the yawl Integrity, off Spurn Head near the mouth of the Humber.

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Joseph WINSHIP was skipper of the vessel and his only child, John Williamson, was approaching his 13th birthday when his father was lost. John would take up the hard and uncertain life of a fisherman – and the curious byname ‘Jacky Windy’.

John married Mary Elizabeth POOL in 1889 and at the next three censuses the household in Chapel Street, and later West Parade, had room for widow Ellis Ann as well as the couple’s six children.

Two of the children had died as infants before 1911 but the boys born first and last made it to their eighties, as did their parents.

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Returning to the fatal storm – you can read an account of it on the archived Looking at Filey. The families of most of the drowned fishermen have some representation on FST but there wasn’t enough time in the day to fill gaps and make sound connections for this post. Find Joseph James WINSHIP here.

A Shaggy Dog Story

CHAPMAN, M (Shaggy) 1891A 1909 newspaper account of the sinking of Lina, (Tuesday’s post), informed readers that the skipper, Mortimer CHAPMAN, was “a few years ago, a famous footballer”. Here he is about 1891 when he played for Filey Red Stars. Several Filey amateurs did go on to professional Football League clubs and perhaps Mortimer was one of them.

His granddaughter, Jane GARTON, spoke about him when interviewed for the Heritage Lottery funded project Exploring Filey’s Past about twelve years ago.

My grandfather was a real Filey character. His nickname was ‘Old Shaggy’…He used to sit in the Memorial Gardens but he always had an old sou’ wester on and never took it off. He never took it off when he went to bed and he was buried in it. But he used to talk to people [and] they all used to talk to him…Old Shaggy, how he got his name, it was something to do with a dog and he used to say to this dog, “shake it shaggy” and then my granddad got the name Shaggy.

He was photographed on the Coble Landing in the late 1940s with eight other fishermen and a couple of children. Can you pick him out?

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Photographer unknown, courtesy Martin Douglas.

Morton, the sixth child of Thomas CHAPMAN and Mary JENKINSON, was baptized on the first of March 1815 but he died in January the following year. He was followed on the 29th  December 1816 by the first of five Mortimer CHAPMANs recorded in Filey Genealogy & Connections. The Chapman pedigree on FG&C doesn’t go back beyond Thomas and Mary so I don’t know if there were earlier Mortimers in the line. (The name seems to have Norman origins and is linked to a couple of places, one in France and the other in the Holy Land. Choose between its resulting meanings – ‘still water’ or dead sea’.)

Only Mortimer born 1844 is on FamilySearch Tree at the moment. He is Shaggy’s uncle. I’ll connect them on FST as soon as I can.