A Tale of Two Hannahs

Researching further into the GASH/STONEHOUSE family I found that Hannah, born in 1854 to David GASH and Anne GLENTON, had married. At the time of the 1891 Census, she was staying with her parents in Sands Road, Hunmanby, described as “Single” but given the surname “SHANTON”. With her was a grandson of David, six-year-old William Shanton. I looked at the page image and saw this unusual family name as THORNTON. Further delving revealed that both Hannah and William had been enumerated twice. They were listed at their home in Cooks Row, Scarborough with John Thornton, 72, and his other son John, 12. John senior’s advanced age, 35 years greater than Hannah’s, sent me to the page image.  He was indeed in his seventies and would die at the end of  1891.

He married Hannah on 7th March 1878 at All Saints Church, Scarborough. They were both of “full age” and both residing at 21 Cook’s Row. Their actual ages were 59 and 23 and they would bring two children into the world, John in 1879 and William in 1884.

The next discovery was a census record for old John in 1871 showing his wife Hannah was born in 1819, not 1854.

It isn’t unusual for someone to marry twice, with both spouses having the same given name. It was quite a surprise, however, to find that John had married Hannah GLENTON in October 1845. Hannah “the First” turns out to be the aunt of Hannah “the Second”.

The marriage register in 1845 reveals Hannah’s father is George, a fishmonger. The 1841 Census shows him living in The Bolts, Scarborough, with his wife (another Hannah) and 15-year-old son, Ambrose. Both of his daughters had flown the nest. Anne, 17, was working nearby in Sandgate as a domestic servant to Benjamin SHAW, a baker.

John’s first marriage produced three children. Elizabeth died aged 6 years and the third child, John, didn’t survive his first year. I haven’t found a record for William’s death. He was twelve in 1861 and it is reasonable to suppose he died before the William of John’s second marriage was born. It is curious that Hannah the Second agreed to her sons being given the same names as her Aunt Hannah’s dead boys.

A George Glenton who married Hannah DARLEY features prominently on FamilySearch Tree but I will follow the lead suggested by a fishmonger of the same name marrying Hannah ARMSTRONG in Scarborough in 1814.

Find Hannah the Second on FST. A few years after John’s death she appears to have married again and died aged 66 in 1921. When I’ve confirmed details I will add the information to the World Tree.

Today on Filey Bay.

20180623Regatta1_2m

Further to yesterday’s link post. It appears that four Englishmen shamed themselves and their country after the England v Tunisia match last Monday. Three inebriated “football supporters” and a “reporter” who sometimes writes for The Guardian. Graham Phillips takes them all to task, using industrial language.

England Nazi-Salute Fans

Response to Shaun Walker’s ‘Nazi Song’ allegations

 

Family Gash

This day 1829 David GASH [LCMS-6D5]was baptized in Boston, Lincolnshire.

Lincolnshire and Yorkshire make up the heartland for British Gashes. Of 208 people born with that name and enumerated in the two counties in 1881 69.7% were yellowbellies. The tykes were fairly evenly allocated to the three Ridings. Only 4.3% had been born outside the two counties; 74.5 % of the 208 were born in Lincolnshire implying a limited migration to Yorkshire. I haven’t tried to find exactly when David made that move. He is in Sutterton, Lincolnshire in 1841 with parents and four siblings and  Kath’s database has him marrying Ann LANCASTER in Scarborough when he was 24 years old.

Here he is on the FamilySearch Tree (FST) the eldest of nine children born to Edward and “Mrs Mary Anne GASH”.

GASHdavid1829_1_FST

But wait, David has a duplicate ID. Here he is shown with some of his descendants and his parents Edward and Mary Ann.

 

GASHdavid1888_1_FST

This second fragment of pedigree is low on children  and the maiden names of wives. Kath’s Filey Genealogy & Connections (FG&C) is richer in Yorkshire coast Gashes and identifies at least one of the wives.  It also links the younger David to three mtDNA generations where FSToffers none.

Yesterday I hunted around for the GASH wives and had some success, finding names that have evaded the compilers of several Ancestry public trees. (I don’t have an Ancestry account so cannot inspect those pedigrees closely or readily contact the owners.)

My perfunctory research needs to be checked but I discovered that “Old David” (born 1829) married the widow Ann LANCASTER. Born Ann GLENTON her marriage to William LANCASTER was registered in Scarborough  in March Qtr 1847 (Vol 24 Page 506).Here’s the GRO entry for David and Ann’s son Edward George.

GASHedwdgeo_GRObirth

I found seven GRO records for children of Edward George and Mary Hannah SAYERS. They did not include an elusive Annie who FST has being born some four years before her supposed parents married. The 1911 Census reveals that Edward George and Mary Hannah had nine children of which four had survived  thus far. I will try to find the two that are missing.

What of “Old David’s” mother, Mary Ann(e) born 1811. The eldest of her four children on FG&C was fortunately born after Civil Registration began and the GRO gives her maiden name as DAMM. GRO Reference 1838 Dec Quarter in Boston Volume 14 Page 222. (There were just 6 Lincolnshire DAMMs enumerated in 1881.)

Both FST and FG&C leave “Young David” single and without issue. He married Henrietta CROMPTON in the first quarter of 1914 (Sculcoates 9d 201) and enlisted about the time his daughter Phyllis was born in 1915. The wee girl died in 1917 aged 2. David died the following year, a couple of weeks after the armistice, while on active service in Hull.. He is buried in Hull Western Cemetery, remembered in St Oswald’s, Filey and online here.

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David’s younger brother, Edward was killed in action about two months before the armistice. He is remembered on the family stone in St Oswald’s churchyard and at the Ploegsteert Memorial, south of Ypres.

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Today’s Image (previous post)

If I hadn’t seen Michael Kenna’s Wave, Scarborough, 1981 I probably wouldn’t have thought of taking a photo like this.  Michael’s website.