A Mariner’s Daughter

I sailed an extra league this morning to make sure I could place Doris, in Goole, in the household of William AARON – and call out Doris Lynette, born 1918 in Athens, Georgia, as an impostor on the FamilySearch Shared Tree.

If you go to Doris Lynette’s details page you will find that one of her seven sources is the birth registration for Doris in 1895.

Just Doris married Thomas Palmer in 1921 and the census of 1939 (the Register) found the couple in Goole with three daughters. (The girls’ married names were added to the census document later. Winifred, for example, married Ronald BEEVERS in Goole in 1949.) Below is a screenshot of the Palmer household as presented by Findmypast.

Doris was 34 years-old when she received news of her father’s death in the Kattegat, en route to Copenhagen.

An Admiralty record gives William’s rank as “First Mate”, his date of death the 18th March, and the cause of death as “shock following immersion”. It also gives the location of the SS Irwell when the accident happened.

I will leave The Mystery of Doris Lynette for someone else to solve.

Mark of Man 60 · Lifeguard Training

Filey Sands

Ancestral Trials

The Misses Mary TOALSTER on FamilySearch (IDs GZMR-29J & 9QVZ-N86) could not, of course, be merged, being different individuals. I had two choices. Declare them “not a match” and then change the name of “Mary E.” to create the person Mary Elizabeth HUNT. Or I could make this change first, thereby removing the “potential duplicate”. I thought it better not to break the chain of data custody and go the “not a match” route. I started the clock to see how long this would take me. After four hours yesterday I had most of the information I held on the two Marys uploaded to the Shared Tree but hit some obstacles along the way and didn’t get as far as connecting Mary Elizabeth to her forebears. The most interesting puzzle involved Sarah ODLING, a grandmother of Mary Elizabeth Hunt. She has this toe-hold on the Shared Tree.

And here she is, usurped –

Sarah UNDERWOOD/HUNT has six sources attached to her record. Two census returns, three baptism records for daughter Sarah Ann and one reference to the baptism of Mary Jane the Elder. None of these sources identify mother Sarah as a born Underwood.

It seems unlikely that there were two Mary Jane’s living together as sisters. I have not found a record of the younger Mary. Here are the birth registrations of four children –

(Roger, Mary Elizabeth’s father-to-be, is usually “Rodger” in subsequent records.)

It appears we should accept Sarah ODLING as the wife of James Crowther Hunt. Here is the parish marriage register record –

Grimsby is in Caistor Registration District and the family crossed the River Humber after Mary Jane was born to settle in Hull. I found it interesting that Sarah could write and her husband couldn’t. Sarah’s childhood had not been easy. In 1851, given age 9, she was descibed as a pauper inmate of Boston Workhouse, with her mother Ann, (married, 48), brother Benjamin (15) and younger sisters Elizabeth (6) and Mary Ann (3).

It gets worse. On the Underwood screenshot above the “real” Mary Jane Hunt marries William AARON and if you look on the Shared Tree they have (perhaps) seven children. The youngest, Doris, has an attached record showing her baptism in 1895 in Goole, which is about thirty miles from Hull. By some genealogical legerdemain, she transforms into Doris Lynette, born in Athens, Georgia in 1918. It should not come as a surprise that Mrs Mary Jane Aaron, aged fifty when Doris Lynette was born, was not in real life the daughter of James Crowther Hunt.

I’m not sure I want to bite the bullet. It feels as if I’ve been put through a cement mixer.

Found Object 51 · Primrose Valley

Lonesome Dove

If I take “Snaith George” away from his parents on the Shared Tree he will have no-one in his past. After several hours of searching, I’ve yet to find his real ma and pa. Based on geography alone, there is a good chance he is the son of John and Elizabeth DOVE. They christened their boy in Bubwith, about ten miles from where “our George” married Rachael Lansdon née BICKERTON. Alas, the few sources that give his age all disagree. The 1841 England & Wales census says he is 35, the 1851 Canadian census offers 47. So, calculated birth years of 1806 and 1804. The Bubwith christening took place on 8 September 1802.

Rachael Bickerton’s birth year is an equally moveable snack – 1806 (1841census), 1801 (1851 census) and a very precise 16 April 1796 attached to her christening in Howden, attended by parents John Bickerton and Jane RICHARDSON. FamilySearch gives eleven hints for Rachel/Rachael and only one is duff – the 1851 census, which makes her the wife of “Middleton George” and mother of three children not her own. In that year, of course, she was over 3,000 miles away in Ontario.

I am waiting for replies to messages I sent a while ago to two contributors to the Doves from Hook/Snaith/Goole. I would prefer it if descendants made the needed corrections.

I wonder how much Snaith George knew about his ancestry. Was he able to tell his children about their roots? Some days ago I discovered that his fourth daughter Harriet married Benjamin F. CHEESBRO in Norfolk, Ontario on 11 September 1858. Today I discovered that this union is peculiarly represented on the Shared Tree.

DOVEharrietCHEESBROben_FSTss

The marriage date is wrong and this Benjamin’s birthplace is given as Saginaw. His two brothers were born in Methley, Yorkshire, a few years later. But, the parents of the Benjamin F. CHEESBRO who married “our Harriet” are given as Joseph and Jane in the Norfolk marriage source. A quick look at the growing Methley CHEESBROUGH family in England looks right, hence the ticks. Its Y-line goes back to Robertus, born 1586, but if you explore the Shared Tree further it becomes clear that Harriet married into a family of great distinction – assuming the earlier generations have been assembled with greater accuracy than those in the 19th century.

For now, in truth, poor Snaith George is bereft of forebears.

The Belgian Vice-Consul for Goole

A shipowner, a shipping agent, a father of five, a widower (twice), and an Englishman born in Wakefield, he rests next to George STERICKER in St Oswald’s churchyard.

D26_IBBOTSONjoseph_20170503_fst

His stone is badly eroded and the Crimlisks did well to decipher what they did forty years ago. My digitization has this:

In affectionate remembrance of JOSEPH IBBOTSON of Goole, who departed this life (19 June 1885?), aged [blank] years.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society has the advantage of having the burial record and offers the correct year of Joseph’s death and his age – 1865 and 65.

I wonder what he was doing in Filey. And how much did the Belgians pay him?

I haven’t been able to discover the names of the ships he owned but, as an agent in the 1830s, he was advertising the transport of goods and people from Selby to Yarmouth, calling in at Goole and Hull – on the “first-class steamer” Ormrod and the steam schooner Albatross.

Albatross_image

The Ormrod is an exceedingly strong built Vessel, Copper-fastened, nearly new, and will be found a most efficient Vessel for the Trade.

The Packet [Albatross] is neatly fitted up with Berths and every accommodation for Passengers that can conduce to their comfort.

Separate Cabin for Ladies, with respectable Female Attendants.

The fare for the Chief Cabin was 18 shillings, which is about £80 in today’s unreal money.

Joseph was survived by two of his five children, Joseph Henry and Hannah Ellen. Barbara, born to first wife Sarah, was the only one who married but she had died three years earlier, just a few months after plighting her troth to John Shepley ASH.

A couple of days after Joseph’s death, newspapers carried notices that Joseph Henry had taken over the business of Shipping and Forwarding Agent at Custom House Quay in Goole. A couple of weeks later the Belgians appointed him Consular Agent for the Port. John Henry didn’t have time to make his fortune. He died aged 27 in 1869. He seems to have been the end of this Ibbotson line and isn’t blood-connected to many forebears either on FamilySearch Tree.

 In staggering contrast, his father’s first wife, Sarah PITCHFORTH, is super-rich in ancestors, connecting to the fantasy world of European Royalty, going beyond Charlemagne to Emperors of Rome. I haven’t travelled all her byways. Perhaps there are some Plantagenets hidden in there somewhere. I was amused, though, to bump into Baldric of Yorkshire, born 1015 and married to Elica Von Schweinfurt.

I’m not responsible for any of this.