Mary Names Her Father

Mary KITCHING was born out of wedlock.

1839_KITCHINGmary_Bap

This is the only source I have found that names her mother as Charlotte. She usually goes by Esther.

In 1841, mother and child are together in the household of Esther’s parents, John and Martha née HINDSON. The first Victorian census was cavalier with ages and didn’t give relationships or birthplaces. Jumping to conclusions is unwise. Mary is at the bottom of the household list with her “twin brother” Samuel.

1841_KITCHINGmary_census

Samuel’s birth was registered in the third quarter of the year.

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The FamilySearch Tree represents the household thus:-

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In Martha’s past, there are six other children. At her death on 18 February 1857, aged 59, the Malton Messenger said –

She was followed to the grave by 12 of her own children (9 sons and 3 daughters) 9 of whom were married, besides a large number of friends by whom she was much respected.

In “fourth daughter” Mary’s future, two husbands and the births of twelve children await.

She married Joseph SNOWDEN in 1857, three months after Martha’s death, and named her father in the marriage register.

1857_GREENLAYfrancis named_mar

“Blackburn” is a strange occupation. You are right if you guess it to be a clerical error for “blacksmith”.

When registering the births of her first six children, Mary gave her maiden surname as Kitching. For the seventh –

1870_SNOWDENkate_birth

And for her second child with Christopher POSTILL –

1884_POSTILLchris_Birth

Mary was 65-years-old when Christopher junior died at twenty-one. He left a son, another Christopher, who was caught in the 1939 Register’s net, thirty-five, unmarried and living in Scarborough with his Aunt Marion, her husband William DEVONSHIRE and their son Leslie. Christopher’s occupation is given as “Café & Speed Boat Proprietor”. That sounds rather racy – something to do with his genetic inheritance, perhaps.

But no, Francis GREENLEY made an honest woman of Esther a couple of years after Mary’s birth. Their first child stayed with the grandparents – and the couple went on to provide Mary with nine full brothers and sisters. Find them on the Shared Tree.

Landscape 118 · Church Ravine

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The Two Elizas

Eliza HOW gave birth to ten children between 1835 and 1858 and she is clearly identified in eight of the nine registrations. (Thomas arrived too early for civil registration and her surname in the GRO Index for Joseph, in 1850, is “STOW”.) The ninth arrival, Henry, married Sarah Mary CHAPMAN in 1876 and the fourth of their daughters, Martha, connected Hertfordshire to Yorkshire when she married Robert Frederick COGILL in 1905.

I had to create records on FamilySearch Tree for both Robert and Martha in order to add the photograph of their St Oswald’s headstone as a “memory”. In the post Guesswork Wives a week ago I mentioned that  Eliza How’s husband Jacob CHILD is also hitched to Eliza HITINS on FST. I haven’t been able to find a source that identifies this other wife by her maiden surname but I cannot remove her without the blessing of CHILD descendants who have contributed to the pedigree.

For now, Robert’s wife Martha is a granddaughter of Eliza Hitins. And Martha’s father, Henry, as the son of Eliza HOW, is still without a wife and children. It would appear to be a simple matter to merge Henry’s duplicate IDs but it could create difficulties for those contributors for whom Eliza Hitins is still accepted as “theirs”.

The good news, though, is that giving Robert’s father an ID, and a wife who was already on FamilySearch Tree, boosted the COGILL pedigree back to the early years of the 17th century through the NELLIST and GREENLEY families.