Remembering Jenkinson Haxby

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission record states that Jenkinson died on the 7th July 1916. His body was not recovered for burial and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial with 1,463 others. I’ve looked carefully down the list and he is the only casualty serving with the 2nd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment.

He is also remembered on the headstone of his grandparents, Matthew and Jane HAXBY in St Oswald’s churchyard but the inscription records his death on the 8th. Only 354 deaths are recorded on the Thiepval Memorial for that day but there are a number of men from the 2nd Bn Yorkshires. I haven’t been able to establish where Jenkinson was killed but after several days of little action in the Battle of Albert the attempt to capture Trônes Wood began on the 8th, so maybe that is where and when he fell with some of his brothers in arms.

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And their beloved grandson L/C JENKINSON HAXBY, 2nd Yorks. Regt., killed in action July 8th 1916, aged 23.

‘Wars bitter cost, a dear one missed.’

(On the Memorial Plaque in St Oswald’s, Jenkinson is among Filey men who died in 1917 and is recorded as serving with the West Yorkshire Regiment.)

I did some work today on his father’s birth family but not enough to put Jenkinson or his mother Elizabeth Ann JENKINSON on the FamilySearch Tree. Grandfather Matthew HAXBY 1834 – 1902.

The Yawl ‘Ebenezer’

Captain Syd Smith’s database offers six fishing vessels named Ebenezer but only one yawl, registered as SH30, official number 14911. She was built in Scarborough in 1856 and was only three years old when she lost three of her crew. The Yorkshire Gazette of 9th April reported the tragedy.

Fatal Calamity at Sea

A deep gloom has been spread over Filey for the last few days, owing to the melancholy intelligence having been received on Saturday last that three fishermen, named Francis Haxby, William Sayers and Edmond Sayers, the two latter of whom were brothers, had met with a watery grave. This sad event occurred about four o’clock in the afternoon of Friday, the 1st inst., 30 miles distant from Flamborough Head. The particulars, so far as can be ascertained, are as follows:- The way in which fishing is carried on here, at this season of the year, is by proceeding out to sea a great distance, perhaps 50 miles, in large decked boats called yawls, manned with a crew of eight men. On reaching the fishing ground, two smaller boats called cobles, which are carried on the deck, are launched, three men getting into each. From these smaller boats the lines are put out, and will often extend for miles in length. The lines are taken in after a few hours, the cobles remaining attached to them. It was at this juncture the accident happened. There was a strong gale of wind blowing from the south-west, which, at this distance from the shore, brings on a dangerous sea. The yawl had broken its fore-yard, and whether the men in the coble had been directing their attention to this circumstance, not sufficiently regardful of their own perils, or from whatever other cause, must remain a mystery; but, sad to relate, on proceeding to the spot, nothing could be seen of the men,  –  the coble was there, and full of water. It is supposed a heavy sea had broken into her, or upset her, and that the coble had afterwards righted herself, – the poor fellows having been thrown out. It is to be regretted that the fishermen do not provide themselves with “life-belts,” to put on when following their dangerous calling; had these men had them their lives would probably have been saved. Edmond Sayers was an excellent swimmer, but this could be of little avail, encumbered as they are with clothing and heavy sea boots. William and Edmond Sayers are unmarried; Francis Haxby has left a wife and three young children. His widow will be entitled to some relief from the Shipwrecked Fishermen and Mariners Royal Benevolent Society, he having been a member of that noble institution. The bodies have not been recovered. The coble, too, and all the lines were lost.

Francis was part owner of Ebenezer, with his brother Jenkinson, Robert JENKINSON and Francis CRAWFORD. Jenkinson HAXBY skippered the boat. The vessel was transferred to Hull in the summer of 1876 and re-registered as H1228.

Francis is remembered on his parents’ headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, and on the stone below, which also names his wife, Susannah, and a fourth child, Mary, who died aged 5 years and 6 months, a year and a half before her father. Francis junior, the couple’s youngest child born in the spring of 1857, would drown from Eliza in October 1880.

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Francis and the Sayers brothers on FamilySearch Tree.

Birth, Marriage, Death, and Burial

1902_HAXBYjenkSIGNATURE.Jenkinson, the last of the ten children born to Richard  HAXBY and Hannah CAMMISH, arrived on this day, 1875. When he was 27, and four years married to Sarah Lizzie SCOTTER, he attended the wedding of older brother Robert and signed the register.

Robert was a 35-year-old bachelor when he married Eliza WATKINSON, (29, spinster). The couple would have three children, George William, born 1903, Richard (1905) and Elizabeth Watkinson (1907).

On the 23rd March 1911, Robert was drowned about eight miles north-east of Flamborough Head.

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Though described in this report as a motor coble, I suspect Annie was perhaps a yawl – to have carried a small boat. In the Deaths at Sea Register (from whence the eight miles distance comes), Robert is listed as “2nd Hand”. I don’t know who the boy Cammish may have been and Captain Syd’s database doesn’t offer a likely candidate for Annie. It does, however, indicate that James DOUGLAS, born 1885, had taken ownership of Contest a week before this sad event. Perhaps the other Filey fisherman James, born 1860 and Sexton at St Oswald’s in his twilight years, was the owner named above.

The funeral of Robert’s son, Richard, lost from Joan Margaret (Tuesday’s post), took place on the 23rd March 1941. A small headstone also remembers his parents and William WATKINSON, an uncle I think.

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In loving memory of RICHARD HAXBY, killed by enemy action, 20th March 1941, aged 36.

‘Love’s last gift’

Also of his parents, ROBERT, lost at sea, 23rd March 1911, aged 43.

ELIZA, died 29th July 1944, aged 72.

Also, WILLIAM WATKINSON, died 2nd Jan 1934, aged 85.

The loss of Robert is also recalled on a much grander stone.

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The “Memory” to Robert on FST has the inscription.

FV ‘Joan Margaret’

It is thought that HMT D. V. Fitzgerald triggered an enemy mine in the River Humber on this day, 1941. The explosion sank the motor fishing boat Joan Margaret, and the herring drifter Gloaming, with the loss of eight lives.

There are two posts about this event on the archived Looking at Filey:-

‘Joan Margaret’

‘Joan Margaret’ Revisited

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‘Joan Margaret’ about 1934, Grimsby New Fish Dock, courtesy Martin Douglas

Wreck Site gives the location of the event, details about the vessels and their crews. Joan Margaret, Gloaming.

Below is a list of those killed with links to their Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) web pages and, for the Filey men, links to their pedigrees on Filey Genealogy and Connections (FG&C). At the time of writing, only George WILLIS can be found on FamilySearch Tree. (I haven’t looked for the Gloaming men on FST.)

 

Richard HAXBY, CWGC, FG&C

Thomas Edmond PEARSON, CWGC, FG&C

George Robert PEARSON, CWGC, FG&C

John William POWLEY, CWGC, FG&C

George WILLIS, CWGC, FG&C, FST

Charles A. LITTLE, CWGC

William S. REDGRAVE, CWGC

Robert SWANN, CWGC

Men Overboard

On this night in 1925, Robert Haxby JOHNSON fell from the steam drifter G.E.S. and efforts by other crew to rescue him were unsuccessful. The fishing boat was 36 miles East by North of Scarborough.

Twenty-two years earlier, and about five miles from Scarborough, a sudden squall capsized the herring coble Wild Rose and it began to sink.

…Two of the crew, Thomas H. Cowling, the skipper, who is 70 years of age, and T. Holmes, had just time to scramble into their small boat before the Wild Rose went down. Jenkinson Cowling, another of the crew, swam alongside the coble, and the fourth man, John Willis, went down with the vessel. His more fortunate companions were of the opinion that he was thrown against the halyards by the lurching of the boat, and, being unable to clear himself in time, was dragged down with it…

Aberdeen Press and Journal, 4 February 1903

The three were rescued by the crew of another coble, Romeo and Juliet, which just made it into Scarborough harbour “in a sinking condition”.

Robert Haxby JOHNSON was 36 years old and is remembered on the gravestone of his maternal grandparents Richard HAXBY and Hannah née CAMMISH.

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In Loving Memory of ROBERT, the beloved husband of ELIZABETH JOHNSON, who was drowned Jan 29th 1925 aged 36 years.

Robert isn’t on FamilySearch Tree yet but his Filey Genealogy & Connections pedigree is extensive.

John married Ann Watkinson DAY in 1894 when he was 21 years old, and the couple had 5 children in their short time together. FamilySearch has three of the children but one, Harry, was fathered by Walter WILLIS, a textile worker in the West Riding. Again, FG&C is currently the more reliable source for this Willis branch pedigree.

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In Loving Memory of JOHN WILLIS, died Feb 26, 1919, aged 20 years.

Also JOHN WILLIS, father of the above, who was drowned at sea Jan 29, 1903, aged 30 years.

We shall meet again