Headstones Project

John and Maisie Crimlisk divided St Oswald’s churchyard into eight areas when they carried out their transcription project in the 1970s. A to H. I took a roll call last week and discovered I haven’t taken as many photographs of the headstones as I’d thought. The small sections, A and B are 85% complete but the largest area, G, is only 41% done.

So far I have photographed 899 stones, 49% of the total. I’m still hoping to complete the photography before the end of the year. So far, the “no can do” total is only 16 graves, less than 1% of the total. This proportion will rise as I tick off those graves without a headstone, having instead a kerb without an inscription or one that is overgrown, or just a seemingly empty plot. At a rough guess, I may have another 500 photographs to take to complete this part of the task. Rather more time-consuming will be the piecing together of families and putting folk on the FamilySearch Tree if they are not already represented there.

Today’s Image

The Mass Dial is above and to the right of the priest’s door into the chancel – though I expect you spotted it easily enough. More about such “objects” here.

There is another incised “sundial” to the left of the door with a more obvious hole where the gnomon once was. It is near the top left of a roughly rectangular section of paler stones that, I was told, had blocked up a medieval leper’s window. I accepted this information as “true” but a little research this afternoon points to many churches in England having leper’s windows – with no supporting data for the number of lepers in the country. I think this may be a case of Fake Lore.

Coble ‘Annie’

Filey Bay was a millpond this morning. Ninety-nine years ago it claimed two lives.

Three men in the coble Annie were returning from the crabbing grounds at about 10.30 am when the tideway, racing strongly round the end of Filey Brigg, tipped them over. The youngest of the three at age 27, John LANE, who had only just been demobilized, clung to the upturned boat and was rescued by Richard Cammish JENKINSON in the coble Sunstar. Matthew Jenkinson CAMMISH, 65,  and Mortimer SCALES, 42, were swept away and their bodies never found.

The drama had been watched from the shore by helpless local folk and early season visitors. Everyone’s thoughts must have turned to the loss of seven Filey men from the drifter Emulator the previous week.

Matthew isn’t represented on FamilySearch Tree but you can find his pedigree on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

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Mortimer SCALES has a pedigree on FST that varies somewhat from FG&C. If each is carefully checked and verified they can possibly be merged without too much difficulty.

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I haven’t yet been able to trace the rescued John LANE.