Jumping to Conclusions

I continued piecing together Ann Eliza COOPER’s life today. I thought that drafting a chronological “sketch” would help me navigate the information deficient years, (marriage to Richard GEOGHEGAN in the 1850s and her whereabouts in 1871, seven years after his death).

On reaching empty spaces, I turned to available sources to see if I could discover something germane, and happened upon a significant “new” person.

I mentioned in an earlier post that Ann Eliza left York after her third husband’s death to work as a Waiting Room Attendant at Withernsea Railway Station. Her granddaughter “Julian” went with her, and at the age of 18 formed a relationship with Railway Porter, William WINSHIP. I had wondered if Julianne’s father was Ann Eliza’s firstborn, Thomas, but had yet to find him – anywhere.

A marriage in 1869 of a Thomas to Anne Elizabeth SIGSWORTH seemed promising but soon hit the rocks. Two years later, an initially dubious Thomas who took Melinda EASTBURN for a wife led to some pieces fitting together. The birth registration of “Julia Ann” Green in Leeds was followed by the death of Melinda Green two years later, at the age of 22. Four years earlier Melinda was enumerated in a Leeds household headed by a 36-year-old Block Cutter called George ELLIS. His wife was Melinda’s older sister Martha, 20; the marriage registered in the June Quarter of 1870. With them was Thomas Eastburn, George’s “nephew”, aged 7 months. I expected to find the boy was illegitimate but what took me by surprise was that the registration (September Quarter) gave him the middle name “Ellis”. What conclusion would you jump to? When my great grandmother was made pregnant and abandoned, she gave her son a middle name that told the world who his father was.

A quick search didn’t find George, Martha or young Thomas in 1881. I couldn’t find a death registration for the boy in his first decade but he clearly didn’t go with his younger half sister (possibly) to York and then to Withernsea.

I still don’t know what happened to Julianne’s father, Thomas (Ann Eliza’s son). When she married William Winship in 1893 she told the clerk that Thomas was a Horse Dealer. In 1901 there is a Thomas Green, widower, with the right age and birthplace, living in Hull and working as a “Commission Agent Horse Racing”. Ten years later he is at a different address in Hull and a “Commission Agent”. An easy conclusion to jump to – that this chap is Julianne’s father. But he writes on the 1911 census form that he had been married for 15 years and had four children, of whom two are living. Perhaps he married again and forgot all about Melinda and Julianne.

Flight of Fancy 22 · Cube

Reighton Sands (...gives a meal man appeal)

Horse Trading

Graves BULMER, Neighbour 2 a few days ago, led a seemingly quiet existence. His son was rather more lively and I wrote about some of his adventures in Looking at Filey – The Liquidation of James Bulmer.

Today, while trying to sort out the paternity of James’ children for FamilySearch Tree, I happened upon an instance of misbehaviour by one of his sons.

“A Bill to the Whole World”

Singular Horse Dealing at Scarborough

Pony “Warranted Quiet When Sound.”

A singular state of affairs was revealed at Scarborough Court on Monday, when James Bulmer, jun. (35), horse dealer, Filey, was charged with obtaining a pony by false pretences. Mr Nicholl (Deputy Town Clerk) in the course of the proceedings mentioned three instances in which the prisoner had given bills payable to the York City and County Bank in payment of horses, where he had an account. In the case in question the prisoner bought a pony for £7 from Mr. Crawshaw, of Scarborough, in payment for which prisoner handed him a bill, which was stamped, and on it prisoner had written: “Pay to my order the sum of £7 for value received to Mr. Newman Crawshaw, Langdale Road, Scarborough, (Signed) James Bulmer, 36 Queen Street, Filey.”

The Chairman: Is it a promissory note?

Town Clerk: No. It is a bill addressed to the whole world. (Laughter.)

Mr. Crawshaw said he would not have parted with the pony if he had not thought the bill would entitle him to £7 when presented at the bank, which marked the bill as worthless. He gave the prisoner a recept and a warranty. The latter was as follows:- “Warranted quiet to drive and ride when sound.” (Laughter.)

Prisoner was remanded on bail.

Bradford Daily Telegraph 31 January 1899

James senior was almost certainly young James’ father but the lad’s mother was probably Ann TEMPLE and not, as Filey Genealogy & Connections has it, “Mary Ann BULMER”. James junior was born in 1864, eleven years before his father married “Miss Temple” but the most convincing birth registration I have for him is in June Quarter 1864 in Bridlington. His name is given as “James Bulmer TEMPLE”. The mother’s maiden surname is absent, suggesting an illegitimate birth. Ann was 23 years old and at the 1861 census was living with James senior at Moor Farm, Reighton, as his housekeeper.

Ann is on FamilySearch Tree in several guises, waiting to be hitched. Here is one. Poor Newman Crawshaw isn’t on the World Tree yet but his household in 1901 is easily found in Sources.

1901_CRAWSHAWnewman