The Beaumonts of Where?

Henry Reginald Tyrell Clare BEAUMONT was buried this day 1900 in St Oswald’s churchyard. I have been unable to link  Henry with certainty to any action in South Africa but his regiment, The Buffs, was at Spion Kop and the Relief of Kimberley. The latter event took place between the 11th and 15th February 1900, giving the poor chap time to fall ill and make his way back to England to die at the end of May. One has to wonder, though, at the time it would have taken to make that journey, and the earlier trip home to marry in 1899.

I haven’t managed to find out whether he married Rachel or Constance. I thought it would be an easy discovery to make, with a Census following only fifteen months or so later. It appears, though, to be a BEAUMONT family habit to dodge the census enumerators, even offering misleading names now and again. More confusing still, some of the birth registrations for Beaumont offspring don’t fit neatly into the available census families.

It was a help to stumble upon The Tathams of County Durham, a pedigree that included Henry’s parents. His father, Joseph Tyrrel BEAUMONT, married Hilda Gertrude TATHAM about ten years after Emily OLDROYD died. It doesn’t, however, answer most of the questions regarding the children of Joseph Tyrrel Beaumont and his father, also Joseph.

This branch of the Beaumonts seems to have rooted in the West Riding, in the Huddersfield and Mirfield areas. Emily was from Dewsbury. Joseph senior married Maria BRITAIN and her ties to Ripon may explain a Beaumont shift towards Harrogate.  Both generations, though, have handsome headstones in a Filey churchyard, even though Joseph senior seems to be the only one to have died in the town.

These Beaumonts clearly had an affection for Filey but kept a fairly low profile here. In 1871 Joseph and Maria were living on The Crescent. Ten years later, Maria was a widow and had downsized, marginally perhaps, to St Martin’s Villa, which she shared with spinster daughter Anne. Maria died in Boston Spa and Anne in Harrogate. Both are remembered on the marble cross in St Oswald’s churchyard.  I photographed it in drizzle and terrible light this afternoon so have chosen to render it rather gloomily. When the sun next shines I’ll make a photo that can be uploaded to FST. Joseph senior and Maria aren’t represented there yet and the younger Joseph doesn’t have all his children or his second wife. The soldier is here.

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Sacred to the memory of JOSEPH BEAUMONT, Esq., who died at Filey, July 23 1880, in the 70th year of his age.

R.I.P.

Also to MARIA, beloved wife of the above, who passed away June 28th 1892.

‘The Lord is my shepherd’

In loving memory of ANNE, eldest daughter of JOSEPH BEAUMONT, Esq, who entered into rest 11th November 1902.

Another Soldier

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The inscription on the family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard tells us that Henry served with the 2nd East Kent Regiment, The Buffs.

There is a record for Henry’s marriage to either Rachel MATHER or Constance LINNELL in Farnham, Surrey, in the last quarter of 1899. It would appear that he came home on leave to wed and fell sick after returning to duty. I assume the enteric fever struck him down in South Africa but will do some more research to confirm this.

Another Killer Gale

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John William was buried just four days after his death, so he must have been almost home. The Register of Deceased Passengers held at The National Archives and available to view online via Find My Past gives the name of the ship and its approximate location when John expired.

Marcotis was almost certainly bound for its home port and 51º10’ N, 6º 40 W places her in the Irish Sea, south-west of the Pembrokeshire coast and about 280 miles from Liverpool. Innocuous as degrees and minutes, the coordinates are fiendish when converted to decimals.

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The inscription on John’s red granite memorial in St Oswald’s churchyard tells us he “died in a gale at sea”, a description that paints a fuzzy, uncertain, picture of his final moments. The Register provides shocking clarity, giving the cause of death as “Hemorrhage of the Lungs”.

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John’s grave is just a few yards from that of his older brother, Edwin, after whom the southernmost Filey Ravine is named. The 1881 Census reveals that Edwin, age 32, was a “Woollen Manufacturer of Martins Sons Employing 930 people”. Ten years later he has passed the running of the factory to John. Perhaps it was too great a burden for the younger brother.

In 1881 John had married Lily, daughter of Benjamin HANSON, another Huddersfield Woollen Manufacturer, employing 372 hands in 1871. John and Lily had two children, Kenneth born 1883 and Gwynneth  Adrienne in 1888. After her husband’s death, Lily moved with the children to Eastbourne on the south coast. In 1911 Gwynneth remained single but Kenneth, 29, “Company Director, Financial Corporation (Private Means)”, was married to Clarisse Lillian nee MELLIER and they had two boys, Patrick Kenneth and Jack Mellier.

For all their wealth and social standing, the Martins were poorly represented on FST. I put in a shift today but there is a lot more still to do.