Thief

At Hull Police Court in December 1854 Jarvis DUNDERDALE stood before the Magistrate, Mr TRAVIS. Described in a newspaper report as a “respectable-looking middle-aged person”, Jarvis he was charged with stealing a silver fork, the property of Ann VARLEY, proprietress of the Cross Keys Hotel in Market Place, Hull.

One of the waiters at the Hotel, Edward WINTRINGHAM, had observed “the prisoner” taking the fork from the silver drawer, Edward followed Jarvis out to the yard, challenged him with the theft and had the police called. PC WOOD (65) arrived and took the thief into custody.

In court, Jarvis said nothing when charged and was committed for trial. Justice must have been swiftly done because the following brief report appeared in the same issue of the newspaper that provided the details above.

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At the 1841 Census Jarvis Dunderdale, given age 30, was living in Myton Gate, a short Walk from the Cross Keys, working as a Waiter. A Sheffield man, he had married Elizabeth WAKEFIELD nine years earlier at Rotherham Minster (as Gervis or Gervase). The couple had two children, Jarvis Jnr (7) and Hannah (4). The birth of another daughter, Catherine, in 1842 gives the family a second representation on FamilySearch Tree.

I spent a little time trying to discover what became of this poor family, without success.

However, I found more information about Ann Varley, born ATKINSON. In the Patrington marriage register in 1839, her father James is described as a Victualer, the same occupation as her husband and father in law. Two years later, James Atkinson is in the census as an Innkeeper, in High Street, Patrington.

When her silver fork was stolen, Ann had been a widow for a year. (Her father had died in the summer of 1851.) William Varley Jnr was 49 years old when he died and his ownership of the Cross Keys Hotel was legally transferred to Ann the following year. At the 1871 Census, Ann was running the Hotel with the help of son James and daughters Sarah and Ada, though the enumerator didn’t give the young Varleys an occupation. Ten years earlier, though, Ann, James and daughter Eliza were keeping the Queens Hotel in Withernsea.  My first thought was that the Varleys had downsized and later returned to the big city and the bigger Hotel. It seems more likely that Ann had added the Queens to her portfolio.

You will find photographs of the Withernsea hotel online but it is Queens Hotel II, built at the beginning of the 20th century and now a care home for the elderly. The Varley property, at the rear of the Railway Station, was demolished long ago and its “footprint” now accommodates the car park of Withernsea Community Hospital.

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If you have clicked the earlier link to the Cross Keys Hotel you will have noticed its proximity to the statue of King Billy. The hotel was demolished in the 1970s and King Billy figured in my childhood. Try as I may, though, I can’t now picture the buildings around the golden horse and rider. (You won’t hear any living Hullensian talk about a statue of William of Orange. Ask for King Billy.)

Ann Atkinson was clearly a remarkable woman. I wonder how well she knew the other resourceful Hull hotelier who has appeared in LaFRedux ­– Richard CORTIS. He was thirty years her senior but outlived her husband by almost 20 years.

Find Ann on FST.

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The Varley broken column in St Oswald’s churchyard, this morning

Lives Cut Short

James VARLEY arrived to “keep” The Crescent Hotel in about 1877. He was experienced in the trade, having helped his parents to run The Cross Keys in Market Place, Hull, for many years.

James’ monument in St Oswald’s churchyard is a distinctive and emblematic broken column and recalls two lives that didn’t last as long as they should have. His second child, Henry James, had an accident while playing, or perhaps helping out, at Church Cliff Farm. A cut became infected with Clostridium tetani and within a few days, he died at the Hotel, aged ten.

Six years earlier, Henry’s mother had died, a day after her thirtieth birthday.

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In 1901, James was living on Crescent Hill with his unmarried daughter Clara. He died in Hunmanby five years later, aged 62, and was brought to Filey for burial.

I wrote a short post about the family on Looking at Filey: Suffer Little Children. I didn’t know back then what had become of Clara but today found a death registration in York that may be hers. If confirmed, she didn’t marry and reached the age of 93.

James and his parents were on FST, and Kate’s mother had an ID too. I will add some more Varleys and Morrishes and, perhaps, hit upon a connection to a more extensive pedigree.

Today’s Image

I was shocked to discover how old the “new bridge” on Filey Promenade is. Here’s a photo taken two years earlier (to the day)…

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The Elusive Fireman

Brothers Henry and Warcup CROSHER/CROSIER both called their second–born children Mary Maria. While Warcup settled in Filey, Thomas moved to Kilham, near Driffield, where he married Bessy ASHBY and brought three children into the world. Around 1870 the family journeyed on to Hull, where it almost tripled in size.

Early in 1890, Mary Maria “CROSHAW” married Paul Alexis HERONNEAU and their first child Louis Paul arrived a year later.  Mother and child are living at census time with widow Bessy and four of Mary Maria’s siblings. The enumerator wrongly identified three of these as “Herroneau”, making five in the household bearing that name. Absent, though, is Paul Alexis, and I failed to find him anywhere else in the city, or beyond.

It isn’t strange to find people in a large British port with somewhat exotic family names but I was surprised to find that PAUL HERONNEAU was genealogical kin to a Googlewhack.

In 1901, Mary heads a household in Merrick Street, Hull, comprising just her married self and four sons. At the baptism of the eldest boy, Thomas Alexis, his father was described as a Fireman. Whether he lit fires and kept them burning or attempted to put them out wasn’t specified.

All attempts to find Paul have failed to uncover vital details about him, but someone showed up later that year to provide the genetic material to make Ida and, in 1904, Leonard.

If the Heronneau family had not lived in the city of my birth I may not have pursued them any further but I was attracted by the name, and the cropping up in sources of places familiar to me.

Thomas Alexis and George Henry Heronneau served in the First World War. Both came home, though Thomas was wounded in 1915.

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I didn’t Find Thomas in the 1939 Register but George Henry was a Packer in the Flour Mills, almost certainly one of the factories I passed several times a week as a child. George Henry’s son, also George, went to the same grammar school as I did – Malet Lambert – winning a Third Form prize in 1939. Young George’s first cousin Roy, son of Alfred Heronneau and Ruth Agnes née GUTHERLESS, won a Special Place at Riley High in 1944.

There were surprisingly few manglings of “Heronneau” in the sources so the family readily presented a coherent pedigree, with all of them descended from the mysterious Fireman. Find Paul Alexis. Someone out there must know where he came from.

An Unexpected Poet

Whatever it may be, frost heave, soil settle or something other, it nudges gravestones from the vertical, and a few will eventually fall on their backs or faces. The headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard remembering George MILNER, and his wife Mary Ann seems unique in appearing to be pulled, ever so gradually, into the earth by an unknown force. Straight down.

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George was born in Hunmanby, a few miles inland from Filey, in 1813. He married Mary Ann PUDSEY in Holy Trinity Church, Hull, in 1838. Their five children were born in that city and one of the three girls, Elizabeth, married John, a younger brother of Warcup CROSIER, who wed the girl next door (Monday’s post).

George followed the same trade as Warcup, and so did John. They were all joiners. But George was also a poet.

At least, that is what he told the census enumerator in 1851. Journeyman Joiner & Poet. Wonderful.

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For reasons unknown to me, the family moved from Hull to Filey during the next decade and in 1871 George was just a plain, and somewhat less romantic, Master Joiner living in West Road.

I went in search of his poems. If there are any out there, I have yet to stumble upon them. I did find this:-

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Poets are known to have become elegiac in country churchyards but further investigation established this George as a Director of Hull’s Cemeteries and probably somewhat older than 33 years. (I didn’t hold too fast to a notion of him in a dual role of making coffins and dealing with the administration of seeing them put efficiently in the ground.)

However, taphophiles may be interested in this extract from the preface to the second edition of the pamphlet referred to above.

In Hull, the town in which the author resides, there is a population of about 70,000; the published returns of the Registrar General, however, only include the parishes of Holy Trinity and St. Mary; and therefore, in dealing with facts, we must confine ourselves to these districts, which, according to the last census, contained a population of 41,130. So early as the year 1301, Archbishop Corbridge mentions a cemetery in Kyngstone. The burying ground is described in the will of John Schayl, in 1303, as the Cemetery of Holy Trinity of Kingston-upon-Hull; in 1320 King Edward granted a vacant piece of ground at the west end of the church, for the enlargement of this churchyard –  the plot altogether, including the site of the church, only contains about 5,040 square yards, and has never since been used as a place of interment for this parish. It is crowded everywhere with bones and coffins, some of the latter within a foot of the surface; the ground, as may readily be imagined, is one mass of decomposed flesh and blood; it is raised two or three feet above the level of the adjoining streets by interments, notwithstanding those streets are now higher considerably than they formerly were. Holy Trinity is situated in the Market-place, and entirely surrounded by dwellings –  at the west, a row of houses overlooks the ground, and in summer months, offensive smells are complained of. In 1783, a new ground was opened for this parish, containing about 14,520 square yards, – the ground has long since been filled, and no interment can now take place without disturbing human remains; this ground has also been considerably raised by interments above the adjoining streets. In the other parish, we find St. Mary’s Church was founded or enlarged in 1333, as Archbishop Melton then granted a licence for “performing divine offices in the chapel, and rites of sepulture in the ground.” The present churchyard contains about 750 square yards; it is frightfully crowded, and the ground raised four or five feet above street level – graves cannot be made without mangling and displacing remains. A new ground was obtained for the parish in 1774, it contains about 2772 square yards; this is very much crowded, so much so that it is necessary to prick with an iron rod for a new grave. The parishes of Holy Trinity and St. Mary, according to the last census, contained 41,130, as before stated; the published Tables of Mortality shew that from the year 1838 to 1846 inclusive, there have been no less than 10, 601 deaths recorded in these two parishes. How then is it possible that, under existing arrangements, violation of the grave can be avoided? No interment can possibly take place without desecration – the quiet of the grave exists but in the imagination.

Our George Milner was buried in St Oswald’s churchyard on 11 May 1890, about a year after Mary Ann was laid to rest. Their son Robert died in Cottingham in 1898 and was brought to Filey for burial in their grave.

Find the family on FamilySearch Tree.

Fishing for Hoppers

The first HOPPER in the Filey Census is widowed fisherman Timothy, age 75 and heading a King Street household in 1841containing five people I have classified as boarders/lodgers – four members of a WILLIS family and a widow, Fanny MORGAN. In 1861, Bridlington born Robert Hopper, sailmaker, is living in Hope Street with his wife Annie Elizabeth, three children and Annie’s sister Susan “BERRYMAN”. In Filey Genealogy & Connections there is a gathering of Patrington Hoppers. The connection of these folk to Filey isn’t immediately clear but their descendants increased greatly and scattered. You can follow them, some to the United States (in the 21st century) on FamilySearch Tree, starting from William and Mary Ann née FEWSON.

There is only one Hopper remembered in St Oswald’s churchyard but the first headstone of 2019 to which I’ve turned my attention has seen me dancing around other Hoppers for much of the day.

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Thomas Holmes JOHNSON doesn’t appear to have representation on FST, neither does his father, or grandfather Frederick HOPPER. Frederick, a fisherman and lifeboatman, was born in Hull but enumerated in Easington in 1861 so I’m expecting to connect him to the Patrington branch. If I am to tag the above headstone photo on FST I will probably need to bring a large troupe of Hoppers together on the World Tree. It may take some time.

(Until this afternoon I didn’t know that you really fish WITH hoppers. It is a variety of dry fly that bamboozles trout.)

Out at Sea

Four big lights on Alfa Italia cut through the murk late this afternoon.  Sarpen and Thornbury remain at anchor in Bridlington Bay and a few miles further south two more tankers, Delta Star and Baltic Favour are awaiting orders. When I checked Ship AIS at lunchtime I noticed Happy Pelican was making good speed to Grangemouth and had to smile, its filthy cargo of LPG notwithstanding.

Down Under

Radio NZ reported yesterday that 2018 was the hottest year since New Zealand records began.

Veteran climate scientist Jim Salinger has calculated the mean annual land surface temperature in 2018 was 13.5 degrees Celsius, which was 0.85C above the 1981-2010 average.

This was “a smidgeon” hotter than the previous warmest year on record, 2016, which was 0.84C above normal.

January, March, July and December were all at least 1C above normal, with January being a massive 3.2C above average, the hottest month ever.

Overall, the country has heated up by 1.3C since records began in 1867, Prof Salinger said.

Read the article here.

I checked the Wellington International temperature data downloaded from Weather Underground and found that the capital’s 2018 was the hottest of the last ten years, and just 0.05°C warmer than 2016. A smidgeon. The Wellington average annual temperature was, as you might expect, higher than the national figure, at 14.25°C. Auckland would no doubt be warmer still, and Invercargill cooler. What will 2019 be like?

Another Man’s Wife

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I initially warmed to the Reverend William when I discovered he’d been baptised at Mappleton Church, a mile or so north of his birthplace in Cowden. My parents had a caravan (of sorts) on the Mill Field at Mappleton and, when on holiday there, I walked past the church several times a day on the way to and from the beach. It seems neat that he should end his days in Filey, as I am likely to do.

I also learned that his grandfather had been one of William CLOWES’ first converts in my hometown, Hull in the 1820s. I attended the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Stoneferry as a child and, as a young man, went up to Mow Cop one wild, windy night after I learned of the early Ranters’ Meetings there.

I was surprised to find William had married three times – and taken aback when I looked for him on FamilySearch Tree and saw him hitched to a fourth woman, Elizabeth Ann ALSTON.

William’s birth family seemed to be all present and correct and at the time of the 1901 census, he was living only eight miles away from Elizabeth Ann and the cotton spinning William Moore.

“Our” William was in Wigan, mourning the death of his first wife Annie Elizabeth COWAN about six months earlier.  The other William and Elizabeth Ann were childless in Chorley.

Here is a newspaper report of the wedding of William and Annie Elizabeth just five years earlier.

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Ten years later the Reverend was staying with his younger brother, James, in Hull. With him were second wife Margaret FISHER and their surviving child, William Henry, aged three. Margaret died about 18 months later, in West Derby – where William married Catherine NICHOLSON in the second quarter of 1916. They moved to Filey in 1919 and each died aged 78, William in 1944 and Catherine in 1955. Their last home, “Hilston”, was in Belle Vue Crescent.

There are photographs of William and Catherine, and more information, here.

Three Soldiers

Frederick Edmund Glanville SOUTHWELL was born in 1889, in Rothwell, Lincolnshire. His grandfather, Henry Glanville senior, was vicar there. To the family, he seems always to have been just Edmund. At the age of 21, he was with his widowed mother in Mitford Street, Filey, his occupation given as a Student of Law. The choice to follow his father into the legal profession must have been a difficult one to take. In 1908, Harry Glanville junior, a solicitor in London and estranged from his family, had died from a drug overdose. The coroner’s verdict was “suicide whilst temporarily insane”.

Edmund must have decided the law wasn’t for him and he became a schoolteacher instead. In short order, he found himself the head classics master at, arguably, the best grammar school in Hull. (As a Malet Lambert kid in the 1960s, I bowed the knee.)

It seems he didn’t wait long to answer his country’s call, enlisting in the front line 4th Battalion of the East Yorkshire Regiment, and serving as a Lieutenant.

He may have seen a great deal of action before he was killed on day two of the First Battle of the Scarpe. This engagement was one of several that are subsumed under a longer campaign, and it is “Arras” that can just be made out on the base of the family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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There is some contextual detail about Edmund’s last battle here. A local newspaper reported some brief details of his life and death.

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Edmund was accepted into the British army as Frederick Edward Granville SOUTHWELL. He is buried at Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun.

Edmund’s brother, Wilfrid, is remembered on the family stone, and on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres. I will attempt a post about him on the anniversary of his death in June.

The third soldier is Thomas Glaves JOHNSON who died this day, 1918, in “Plugstreet”.  For part of the war, Ploegsteert Wood was a relatively quiet area where wounded soldiers recovered from heavier fighting elsewhere. In April 1918, though, it became a battleground. Thomas served with the 4th Battalion South Staffordshires and you can read the Regiment’s War Diary entry for the 10th April here. More about Plugstreet here.

Over 11,000 soldiers are remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial and have no known grave. Thomas may be one of very few killed nearby. One has to wonder why his body wasn’t recovered for burial.

He is remembered also on the broken family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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also THOMAS GLAVES, son of the above T.H. AND M. JOHNSON, killed in the Great War, April 10th 1918, aged 19 years.

The SOUTHWELL brothers and Thomas are all represented on the FamilySearch Tree.

Edmund: LRR1-8K5

Wilfrid: LRR1-NC9

Thomas: L8R4-XHM