Not So Plain, Jane

I noticed a detail in one source this morning that put a question mark against yesterday’s narrative that Jane WATKINSON married two WYVILL brothers.

On their entry in the St Mary, Hull, marriage register Crompton is correctly identified as a widower, and his bride as a widow but, against convention, Jane gives her maiden name WATKINSON, rather than her first married name – WYVILL. The register, alarmingly, states that her father is William COULTAS, Labourer (deceased).

The register entry for Jane’s first marriage to James Wyvill gives her father as William WATKINSON and helpfully adds the detail that he is “Sexton to Filey Parish Church”. This fits perfectly with Jane’s memorial on her father’s headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of WILLIAM WATKINSON, for 32 years Sexton of this parish,

died 20th March 1884, aged 76 years.

‘A door keeper in the House of my God’

Also MARY wife of the above who died 13th April 1897 aged 84 years

‘Thy will be done’

Also JANE WYVILL their daughter died March 19 1930 aged 79

‘Her end was peace’

This Jane may be a second iteration – there’s a birth registration in 1848 for a Jane who may have arrived earlier. I haven’t, though, found a death record, or the birth of a second Jane in 1850 or 1851. However, there is a christening source for March 1851, and that year’s census return gives Jane’s age as “1 mo”.

In 1871 there is a census entry in Mosey’s Yard for Jane, first husband James Wyvill and their first child William, also one month old. (The little chap wouldn’t see the year out.) Nearby in Queen Street, James is recorded again with his wife Elizabeth and three children. This isn’t a transcription error – “James” is clearly written – but the children belong to Crompton Wyvill and his first wife Elizabeth Jane FELL.

Support for Jane marrying Crompton after the deaths of her James and his Elizabeth Jane is found in the 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses. As close families would, Crompton and Jane accepted the children from those first marriages as their own, and no attempt is made by the census enumerator to indicate the mix of biological parents. On census night 1911, Jane, a widow aged 60 and working as a laundress, is with her “grandson”, 11-year-old Frank Cappleman Wheeler WYVILL. The boy’s grandmother is, of course, Elizabeth Jane Fell. Jane confirms that she had given birth to just three children, of whom one had died. That would have been William.

I can’t explain the naming of William Coultas in the Hull marriage register, mentioned above. Jane’s eldest sister Maria had married a Thomas COULTAS and the couple gave some of their children names that are found in other Watkinson families. (Example – John Clark COULTAS and John Clark WATKINSON.)  Maybe the clerk at St Mary’s had a senior moment.

Jane, Elizabeth Jane and the two Wyvill brothers don’t yet appear as they should on the Shared Tree. For now, you may have to go into the Details screens to see everyone I’ve mentioned. (Maria isn’t represented yet.)

PC Harvey and the Fisher Lads

In the summer of 1870, five Filey fisher lads were in court, charged with obstructing a footpath on the Crescent “by walking abreast and jostling each other”.

P.C. D. Harvey, stationed at Filey, said that on the 19th [of June], about 8 p.m., he was on duty there, on the Crescent. His attention was drawn to the defendants, all standing on the footpath and larking. He crossed over the road to speak to them, but on seeing him they made off. He followed them, and told them if they continued this practice, he would have to report them.

On that same evening, Police-sergeant Hanswell, in plain-clothes, saw the defendants, walking four or five abreast…

…and taking up nearly the whole of the pathway, which is 9 or 10 feet wide. They repeatedly jostled each other when persons were coming, so as to force them off this pathway. He watched them for about half an hour…and saw several people had to turn off. For some time this practice had been going on and many complaints made.

The defendants were found guilty and offered a choice of paying the court 6s 6d or going to prison for 7 days.

Three other Filey fisher lads were offered the same choice for a similar offence.

The miscreants were Thomas Robinson, George Arvery, Abraham Sanderson, William Waller, Matthew Cammish, Benjamin Watson, William Scotter and Alfred Lowley.

I traced most of them were quickly in Filey Genealogy & Connections, aged between 16 and 18. Four or five years later, several were married and fathers. The sea may have given them a living but it also took away. Abraham Sanderson was baptized on 15 October 1854 and his father was drowned three days later. William Waller was eight when his father may have suffered a similar fate. If Matthew Cammish was Matthew Jenkinson Cammish (born 1854), he would mourn the loss at sea of four uncles. William Scotter was not Filey-born. One of his sons would be killed in the First World War, aged 29.

I imagine the jostling fisher lads were slightly older versions of this bunch, posing against the lifeboat house doors.

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Photographer unknown, no date, courtesy Martin Douglas.

Daniel HARVEY was caught in Filey by the census enumerator the following year, living in Church Street near the vicarage. Both he and his wife, Mary Jane, were Gloucestershire born and bred but spent most of their adult lives in Yorkshire. They had eight children and by 1871 had buried two of them; Marmaduke at about the time the fisher lads were misbehaving. Of the five young ones in Church Street, three would reach a good age.

At age six, Daniel was a “cloth worker” in Minchinhampton and at 26 a pawnbroker. Entering the police force was good for him. In 1881 he was a sergeant in Gate Fulford, York and ten years later a Superintendent, living “above the shop”  in Welton near Hull.

Daniel died in 1899. I was initially surprised that this Harvey family was not represented at all on the FamilySearch Tree. The only son to make it to adulthood had ended up as headmaster of a school in Cumberland, where his wife was the assistant head. But they had no children of her own. Annie Eliza Harvey did not marry and Lilian’s marriage didn’t last long – husband Walter JACKLIN died at 43. So there are no known descendants of Daniel and Mary Jane to share memories with us.

I found a way to remember them through Wallace Dean’s wife, Sarah Elizabeth GREENWOOD. I’ll add some more of their people over the next few days.

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The Crescent, this afternoon

Another Tale of Two Sisters

Catherine and Selina TOCK were born to George and Ann née PARISH  in Burringham, Lincolnshire.

By the age of 25, Catherine, now “Kate”, had moved just five miles from her birthplace to work as a housekeeper to William CAMPBELL at Ashby Grange. The farm’s 250 acres would later be swallowed up by industrial Scunthorpe. It took employer and employee four years or so to decide that they should marry. Two more years passed and Kate had to to say a final farewell. William is remembered in Filey churchyard, on a stone that is very slowly falling backwards.

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In loving memory of CATHERINE, widow of WILLIAM CAMPBELL, late of Ashby Grange, Lincolnshire, who died April 21st 1894 aged 59 years.

Kate took on the running of the farm and although she didn’t have a child of her own, the house rang with a little girl’s voice in 1871. Her niece, Kate Edith HOCKNELL, 4, was there on census night, having crossed the Humber from her home in Hull. (Both were recorded as “Catherine” by the enumerator.)

Little Kate was the daughter of a third Tock sister, Jane (sometimes Alice Jane), who may have been responsible for encouraging the other two to move to Yorkshire. She married John HOCKNELL in Hull in 1864.

Selina crossed over the river soon afterwards, marrying Robert Lamplough BROWN in Bridlington in 1866. Family history repeated itself. She buried him two years later.

As she grew older Kate seems to have gone back to being Catherine. She continued to farm at Ashby Grange but in 1881 held only 142 acres, the address now “South Grange”. Ten years later, and a widow still, she was living in Melville Terrace, Filey, with Selina. The youngest of the Tock sisters was a widow for the second time. About ten years after her first husband died she had married William HALL. In 1881 he farmed 262 acres near Hunmanby and the household included his son with Selina, John Hall (1), and “son in law”, George Hudson Brown, (14).

William died in North Burton in 1890 and a year later Selina had moved to Filey. I don’t know for sure if the two sisters lived together for the four years remaining to Catherine but at some point, Selina left Filey. I haven’t discovered her whereabouts in 1901 but in 1911 she was with a son, Thomas, in  Southport, Lancashire. (After John’s arrival in 1880 Selina had given birth to three more sons as regularly as tockwork, each June Quarter until 1884.) Thomas, 29, worked as a Grocer’s Assistant. I can only find one death registration that fits Selina – in 1921 in Ormskirk Registration District, which includes Southport within its boundaries,. She was 79 years old.

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Melville Terrace this afternoon

Christ and Christiana

I looked deeper into the Yorkshire Sigsworths this morning and happened upon Christiana, daughter of yet another John, and Hannah – or was it Elizabeth?

The Market Weighton church register has this baptism record –

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Every other source I found, beginning with the 1841 census, asserts that Elizabeth is Christiana’s mother.

Market Weighton was Elizabeth’s home village but the couple was living some distance away at the time, in Wawne. In every census in which Christiana is recorded her birthplace is given as Market Weighton, except the last, 1911, when Wawne appears. “Hannah” may simply be a clerical error.

John Sigsworth followed a lowly occupation – licensed hawker – and Christiana worked as a domestic servant before she married Thomas MARSHALL, a bricklayer, in 1867. They had three children. Their firstborn was registered as John Sigsworth MARSHALL and this is serendipitous for a couple of reasons. FamilySearch Tree has, for now at least, a pedigree in which Christiana’s husband is married to another woman!

If John’s middle name doesn’t convince that Miss Waudby is an impostor, the 1871 census seals the deal. John Sigsworth Marshall, aged 2, is enumerated twice. He is with his parents and sister in Walter’s Terrace, and with his grandparents, John and Elizabeth Sigsworth, not far away in Witham. (Both addresses are in the Sculcoates Registration District.) Elizabeth gives her birthplace as Market Weighton. For Christiana, the enumerator just put “Market”.

I was raised a short distance from Witham, a dusty, aromatic area by the River Hull. Fairly quiet in the 1950s and 60s but I imagine it was crowded, noisy – and even more smelly – in Victorian times. Growing up in a Sculcoates Terrace may not have been easy. In 1901, 67-year-old Thomas Marshall was caretaker at a board school and John Sigsworth, 32, single and still living with his parents, was a general labourer. In 1911, Thomas described himself as a retired bricklayer and John, who still hadn’t found a wife, worked on the docks.

I don’t know what sort of life Christiana Waudby had. The after-marriage census sources attached to her tree belong, by rights, to her Sigsworth namesake. She doesn’t have any grandparents.

The other Christiana lived her threescore and twenty years amongst the poor of England’s third-largest port, probably oblivious to her stupendous heritage. FamilySearch connects her to a “super pedigree”, rightly or wrongly, making her a direct descendant of that Usual Suspect, Charlemagne, and a bewildering array of other nobility – kings of what would become France, Germany and Hungary, with a few Plantagenets thrown in, plus Franks, Merovingians and Picts. En route to the King of Kings.

If you start a journey with Christ and go back in time I suspect you will end up with the First Couple. That would be no surprise, but on the way, you will bump into King Serug, aka Sargon of Akkad, who has been reincarnated in this social media age. ROFL.

Good luck travelling forward in time. You may wander for hours before you find Christiana Sigsworth. It might be easier going from Christiana to Christ.

The Impossible Wife

It was only a few days ago, but I have already forgotten what steps led me to Mary Jane JENKINSON. My genealogy workflow has always been rather chaotic and I have been attempting to instil some discipline into it. To keep track of Filey people, I now have a couple of Excel spreadsheets and several lists (in Word) to monitor chronology (important dates), locations and other things that seem important. There is rather more duplication of data input than I’d like but, hey, I have nothing better to do.

Anyway, I found Mary Jane on FamilySearch Tree married to the wrong man. My constant and mostly reliable guide, Filey Genealogy & Connections, waved the warning flag.

FamilySearch, as I write, has given Martin GULLEN three wives.

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You will notice that Jane and Mary Jane share the same family name and dates of birth and death. They also share a couple of children.

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Jane is without parents on both FST and FG&C. She was baptised on 6 April 1867 at the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Filey by her mother, Jane Jenkinson née COATES. The name of the child’s father is not known – she arrived a couple of years after her mother’s first husband drowned. Jane the Younger, had five Jenkinson half-brothers and sisters but they all acquired a stepfather when Jane the Elder married John PRESTON in 1870.

Jane, the first wife of Martin Gullen, died on the 5 August 1914 in Gristhorpe (Filey Parish) and is remembered on Martin’s headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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JANE, the beloved wife of MARTIN GULLEN of Gristhorpe, died Aug 5th1914, aged 47.

‘Farewell dear husband be content

For unto you I was but lent;

Weep not for me nor sorrow make

But love my children for my sake.’

There were five children. The youngest, Edith Mary, was seventeen when her mother died. Edith’s “other mother” on FST died childless on 7 September 1940. The only child of Matthew “Walsher” Jenkinson and Elizabeth née BAXTER. Mary Jane married John Richard HAXBY in Yarmouth in 1912, at the age of 46.

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I messaged Isobel via FST to suggest the “impossibility” of Mary Jane and have been given permission to make the necessary changes to the pedigree. Isobel is Martin’s great-granddaughter so I feel under some pressure to get things right first time.

I will unlink Mary Jane, marry her to John Richard and also wed Lily Shepherd née ALDEN to her first husband.

A stone has fallen next to Martin’s grave. It remembers Tom Gullen and his two wives, Alice and Emma Louise. Neither woman has forebears on FST. More work!

Labour

20190524CorbynLabourI didn’t pay much attention to the Labour Party’s invitation to vote for its candidates in the EU Elections. Yesterday I caught wind of a stench emanating for this organization. One of their cats, from years ago, had escaped from the bag. Flea-bitten, covered in sores. Stinking. This morning I watched Dionne “go off on one”. A former policewoman, she had picked up on what Carl Benjamin has just revealed. She is very angry. In seven terrible minutes, she might make you angry too – and vow never to vote for Labour again. Not just because of Corbyn’s Brexit betrayal. There is no chance whatsoever of Labour bringing this benighted, laughing-stock nation together. (If the links don’t work you will know the filthy story is true and hopefully will find other ways of getting out into the wild.)

Alice and Her Sisters

Alice COCKCROFT was one of the three widows left to “lament their bereavement” following the deaths of their husbands in November 1852. She was well practised in lamentation.

On the 29th August that year, her younger sister Esther had been laid to rest, aged 17. Ten days later, her elder sister Hannah was buried.

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Alice’s daughter Mary was about 9 months old at this time and her niece, Sarah Ann BIELBY, had recently celebrated her first birthday. There may not have been much discussion before the bereft man and woman, each with an infant to raise, chose to live together. (They would be inseparable for about fifty years.)

The 1861 census found Alice keeping house for George Bielby and Sarah  Ann in Foxroyd Yard, Flamborough. (Mary was with grandmother Sarah Cockroft in South Street.) Ten years later the two girls, now 19, were in Front Street, Flamborough, with their “single parents”.

Mary Stephenson flew the unusual but practical nest first, in 1874, to marry William Joseph GARDINER. The couple moved to Hull and lived in Terry Street for about forty years – without the “blessing” of children.

Sarah Ann married Richard Acklam BAYES in September 1876 and had four children, three girls and a boy who would play cricket for Yorkshire.

George William Bayes, as an amateur in a summer sport, would almost certainly not have given up his job as a fish buyer, or his home in Flamborough. In 1933 he made a short film of fishermen at North Landing and “the climmers” on the headland. You can watch it here. George William was not related by blood to George Stephenson but it would be surprising if he hadn’t been told stories about his “granduncle”.

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Screengrab from George William’s film.

I have made some connections on the FamilySearchTree that help to form a picture of the future denied to George Stephenson. I am unable to present his forebears because there are problems to be resolved.

I have found Flamborough Fishing Families to be a reliable online resource but in this instance, it doesn’t agree with FST.

FFF indicates that George’s parents are George and Mary née CHADWICK. I think this is correct.

FST marries George, son of George and Mary, to a “Mrs Stephenson”, with daughters born in 1857 and 1862. I think Mrs S is Jane DANBY, of North Frodingham. She married George there and they raised their family in Roos. Just to confuse matters further, FFF has the George who went to Roos marrying “Elizabeth”.

Of the three men who drowned in 1852, two families (Bailey and Major) have representatives buried or remembered in Filey St Oswald’s churchyard. If I find Flamborough Stephenson connections to Filey I may return to the difficulties with George senior and junior.

Thief

At Hull Police Court in December 1854 Jarvis DUNDERDALE stood before the Magistrate, Mr TRAVIS. Described in a newspaper report as a “respectable-looking middle-aged person”, Jarvis he was charged with stealing a silver fork, the property of Ann VARLEY, proprietress of the Cross Keys Hotel in Market Place, Hull.

One of the waiters at the Hotel, Edward WINTRINGHAM, had observed “the prisoner” taking the fork from the silver drawer, Edward followed Jarvis out to the yard, challenged him with the theft and had the police called. PC WOOD (65) arrived and took the thief into custody.

In court, Jarvis said nothing when charged and was committed for trial. Justice must have been swiftly done because the following brief report appeared in the same issue of the newspaper that provided the details above.

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At the 1841 Census Jarvis Dunderdale, given age 30, was living in Myton Gate, a short Walk from the Cross Keys, working as a Waiter. A Sheffield man, he had married Elizabeth WAKEFIELD nine years earlier at Rotherham Minster (as Gervis or Gervase). The couple had two children, Jarvis Jnr (7) and Hannah (4). The birth of another daughter, Catherine, in 1842 gives the family a second representation on FamilySearch Tree.

I spent a little time trying to discover what became of this poor family, without success.

However, I found more information about Ann Varley, born ATKINSON. In the Patrington marriage register in 1839, her father James is described as a Victualer, the same occupation as her husband and father in law. Two years later, James Atkinson is in the census as an Innkeeper, in High Street, Patrington.

When her silver fork was stolen, Ann had been a widow for a year. (Her father had died in the summer of 1851.) William Varley Jnr was 49 years old when he died and his ownership of the Cross Keys Hotel was legally transferred to Ann the following year. At the 1871 Census, Ann was running the Hotel with the help of son James and daughters Sarah and Ada, though the enumerator didn’t give the young Varleys an occupation. Ten years earlier, though, Ann, James and daughter Eliza were keeping the Queens Hotel in Withernsea.  My first thought was that the Varleys had downsized and later returned to the big city and the bigger Hotel. It seems more likely that Ann had added the Queens to her portfolio.

You will find photographs of the Withernsea hotel online but it is Queens Hotel II, built at the beginning of the 20th century and now a care home for the elderly. The Varley property, at the rear of the Railway Station, was demolished long ago and its “footprint” now accommodates the car park of Withernsea Community Hospital.

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If you have clicked the earlier link to the Cross Keys Hotel you will have noticed its proximity to the statue of King Billy. The hotel was demolished in the 1970s and King Billy figured in my childhood. Try as I may, though, I can’t now picture the buildings around the golden horse and rider. (You won’t hear any living Hullensian talk about a statue of William of Orange. Ask for King Billy.)

Ann Atkinson was clearly a remarkable woman. I wonder how well she knew the other resourceful Hull hotelier who has appeared in LaFRedux ­– Richard CORTIS. He was thirty years her senior but outlived her husband by almost 20 years.

Find Ann on FST.

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The Varley broken column in St Oswald’s churchyard, this morning