Decline and Fall

So, men responsible for the deaths and misery of millions are ennobled. What is the world coming to?

This chimpanzee deserves a knighthood.

Journal

2017 Filey

Monday

The afternoon walk was uneventful. Quite a few people on the sands, all of them visitors I’d guess. And none displaying any anxiety about the coming nuclear war. Apparently, it is going to kick off on the 17th of February. Or maybe a few days before, to be followed by the Second Coming of Jesus. Exciting times, huh?

In the everyday fight for truth against lies and “fake news” several front line YouTube soldiers on the side of righteousness are discovering that their vlogs are being demonetized by Google AND having their PayPal accounts frozen. The elites are clearly concerned that The Truth is reaching a growing audience of people who are tired of being sheeple. The current bought and sold Big Platforms must be under severe pressure to curb the flow of objective reporting. It seems unlikely that making Truth Telling uneconomic will seriously reduce availability. New and independent platforms will spring up – until the PTB decide to shut down the Internet altogether. HAM Radio anyone? And snail mail? You can see where we are heading though. Civil Strife. Better perhaps to go straight to Nuclear Armageddon and have done with it.

Anniversaries

1875 · Sarah Jane MAULSON · 2026 Cammish E155

1841 · Hannah DANBY · MG8J-3XD

Hannah’s family seem to have been content to live in and around Hunmanby but marriage to Francis MITCHELL opened the way to a Filey heritage replete with CAMMISH, COLLING, DOUGLAS and SCOTTER forebears. It would take a while and the connections are yet to be made on FamilySearch. Her grandson Francis, born in 1908, waits on the Shared Tree for his bride.

1897 · John William COLLEY & Jane LUNDY · 364 Colley G275 

John William and Jane have five children on the Shared Tree but I can’t make any sense out of “Nellia”. Third child John William Lundy (by my reckoning) was buried on their fourth wedding anniversary. (See below.)

1875 · Sophia Nunn née HAXBY · 1853 Nunn E64

1901 · John William Lundy COLLEY · L2BV-WKS

Old News

Friday 2 January 1885 AD.

District Intelligence.

FILEY.

FILEY VOLUNTEER LIFE-SAVING AND ROCKET BRIGADE.-The second anniversary of this company took place yesterday at Mr Fountain’s, the Ship Inn, Filey, and was celebrated by an excellent dinner, to which about 30 members of the brigade and their friends sat down. Captain Ling occupied the chair, and Mr Ellis, chief officer of the Coastguard, was in the vice-chair.

The Scarborough Mercury

I found Francis ELLIS on the Shared Tree. He had seven children with Elizabeth Small BROWN but five are “missing”. I don’t know when I will find the time…

Water 51 · Martin’s Ravine

Looking for Miss White

Robert Tate KILLINGBECK was an older brother of Tom Holland, (killed at Gallipoli, see A Different World). He married Christiana SELLERS in August 1895.

Thomas, Christiana’s paternal grandfather, was born at the end of the 18th century and had at least six children. There is an empty space on the FamilySearch Shared Tree where their mother should be.

Blue hints for Thomas point to “Sarah” being the mother of two baptised children. Filey Genealogy & Connections gives her birth family name as REID and I attached a note some years ago saying that FamilySearch offered WHITE. More recently, a Sarah WILES had fulfilled the role of wife and mother – and had then dismissed for being “wrong”.

There is a Sculcoates parish marriage record of a Thomas SELLORS marrying Sarah White in January 1819. She would have been no more than seventeen years old.

Census records would show Carnaby or Bridlington as Sarah’s birthplace and Thomas was a Hunmanby man, so the couple marrying in Hull is a bit concerning. Some solid evidence is needed if Sarah White is to be returned to the Shared Tree.

I caught a glimpse yesterday of a Find My Past member’s tree that had lonely Thomas dying in Australia in 1878, but amongst his sources on the Shared Tree is the 1881 census putting him in the Northgate home he had occupied for many years.

The seven grandchildren here had been born to daughter Mary Jane and husband William SMITH. Mary’s older brother George also had a large family – with a Mary SMITH (confusing, huh?) and it was their ninth child, Christiana, who became Mrs Robert Tate Killingbeck. A son, Thomas Holland, was nine years old when his eponymous uncle was killed at Gallipoli.

Landscape 146 · Church Ravine

“Tighten My Handlebars”

These may have been the last words spoken by George STEVENSON, 14, on the evening of May 4th 1904. The people gathered by his bedside agreed that, in a brief moment of consciousness before he died, he was addressing an older brother.

In 1901 George was living with his parents, two brothers and two sisters at Number 1, The Beach, Foreshore Road in Filey. He had a job in Hunmanby and was pedalling home from work when he rounded a corner and ran into a pony that was pulling a cart belonging to Joseph DANBY of Old Hall Farm. Francis MALTBY, a labourer, was a passenger in the cart. With a strong following wind, the boy was “going at a fair pace”. Newspaper reports indicate that George was on the wrong side of a road wide enough for two carts. Those final words, uttered most probably to James, 16, suggest a mechanical fault had resulted in the fatal loss of control.

Farmer Danby conveyed George to Filey and a doctor was called. At the inquest, held at the Horse Shoe Inn, Hunmanby…

Dr FORSTER said the shaft of the trap had apparently struck the deceased in the chest, rupturing a lung, and causing other serious injuries, as the skin was not broken, only scraped…

The cycle which deceased had ridden was brought into the room, and showed how fearful the impact was.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death,” exonerating Mr Danby from blame.

The father of the deceased rose and thanked Mr Danby and Dr Forster for the kindness they had shown his boy, and, much affected, Mr Danby deplored the accident.

Hull Daily Mail, 5 May 1904

In 1911, the Stevenson family was living in the same home on Foreshore Road. Henry had married and moved away. Jane had married too but was at the house on census night with her one-year-old daughter, Isabel Stevenson ROBERTS. Older brother Thomas Edward, 33 and single, had moved back in with his parents. Sister Mary Darnton was also unmarried. She is remembered, with George, on the restored stone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

Newspaper reports, birth and burial records agree that George was fourteen when he died. Richard Jesse Stevenson noted on the 1911 census form that he had been married 42 years, and that only one of his thirteen children with Mary Darnton HULLOCK had died. Find the family with ten children on the FamilySearch Shared Tree.

Sand 39 · A Fleeting Impression

Filey Sands

Migrating Birds

Robert BIRD ran a successful business as a tailor and woollen draper in Queen Street, Filey, for a quarter of a century or more. He seems to have had only two children with Ruth nee POSGATE; Mary Jane born in 1835 and Samuel Robert who arrived twelve years later. Both were with their parents when the 1861 census was taken. Mary Jane married in 1864 and built a nest with Alfred STATHERS. Robert retired from business not long afterwards and flew south to London where the enumerator found him in Hungerford Road, Islington, with Ruth and Samuel Robert, 24, who was working as a junior clerk in the Public Record Office. The trio had a lodger, a commercial traveller in the woollen trade called Adolph WEPPLER, who had been blown across the German Ocean by the winds of fate. The live-in servant, Elizabeth STATHERS, aged 40 and unmarried, was most probably Mary Jane Bird’s sister in law.

The older Birds may have tired of the Great Wen because ten years later they are enumerated in Westcott, just outside Dorking. They are living at The Lodge – and I want to believe they had a few contented years in this small property –

Nowadays, you would have to hand over about £600,000 to acquire ownership but, hey, it is only a couple of hundred metres from Nirvana Cycles.

Robert died in January 1885 and the homing instinct in Ruth was too strong to keep her in Surrey. She is buried in Filey – and her stone remembers Robert. I have put a photograph of it on the Shared Tree.

Path 127 · Headland Way

to Speeton Sands

Bird Watching

There are about sixty representatives of the family BIRD in Filey Genealogy & Connections but only three are remembered in St Oswald’s churchyard. One is Ann, who reached the grand age of eighty. I photographed her stone this morning.

The dedication to “our dear mother” suggests there were two or more children to mourn her loss. Ann did not marry and there are birth registrations for two girls, in 1867 and 1870, that could be her daughters. Ann Mary the First died before her first birthday. Ann Mary the Second was 9 months old when the 1871 census was taken, living with her mother and grandfather Thomas Bird in Murray Street. Thomas, a butcher and a baker, died in 1876. In 1881 mother and daughter are again found in Murray Street, with Ann senior described as a confectioner.

I don’t know what happened to Ann Mary after 1881 but Ann is living alone in Providence Place, working as a charwoman, in 1891, 1901 and 1911.

Ann Bird’s presence on the Shared Tree is minimal.

And so is her father’s –

Thomas had seven children with Ann BRUMPTON, and he was one of nine children born to Robert Bird and Elisabeth (or Elizabeth) JOHNSON. Most of these Bird children can be spotted on the Shared Tree, all but two of them unconnected to any of their siblings. I will attempt to bring them all together over the next few days but I will have a score of merges to do and at least five Bird descendant families to deal with.

Measure of Man 54 · Filey Promenade

A Request…

…for a headstone photograph arrived from Find a Grave a few days ago that I was able to  claim. God’s Acre in Hunmanby is close to a bus route and I made the short journey yesterday. As I searched for the target, I took the opportunity to photograph the war graves and a few memorials bearing familiar family names. I was pleased to find the Five Angels.

Having fulfilled the FaG order, I have just added the CAMPBELL family stone as a memory on FamilySearch. The three remembered were adrift on the Shared Tree but Agnes Octavia had a duplicate ID that facilitated connection to a well-populated pedigree that will take you back to the 15th century.

Bird 96 · Chaffinch♀

Still Missing

Four days into the year and it is clear that I have little hope of reaching my target of putting a profile a day on Wiki Tree (with a Filey churchyard headstone photo attached.) Six months ago (21 July) I pointed out the “bad marriage” of Ann TAYLOR to Richard MARSHALL. A contributor to the family has given Ann her rightful husband so that I can now honor the sacrifice of their grandson, Thomas CLARK, who went missing on the Western Front in July 1917. The work involved in preparing for his memorial to be put on FamilySearch and Wiki Tree has taken several days – mainly because links appeared to several previously unrecorded family units.

I put the stone remembering Thomas on the Shared Tree as a memory this morning and will attempt to create his Wiki Tree profile tomorrow.

On 19 July last year I wrote briefly about Thomas, owning up to not finding a record of his death on the Commonwealth Graves website. I have searched again but his disappearance is still a mystery. He has been confused online with a Thomas CLARKE who went missing in action in July 1918. His body was recovered and he is remembered at Pernes British Cemetery in the Pas de Calais – but his parents lived in Leicester, so he is almost certainly not our Thomas (the provided Filey connections notwithstanding).

Edmund, Ann Taylor’s younger brother, crossed the Pennines and married in Lancashire. His son James emigrated to Canada and some of his descendants (the children of Brian Taylor) traveled on to New Zealand. My thanks to Joan for this information – and for making it easy for me to add the remembrance of Thomas to the pedigree.

Townscape 65 · Scarborough

South Bay

The Donkin Sisters

Ten days ago, in Every Two Years,I wrote –

There is much still to do. Matthew [HALLAM] must be given his first two wives and Jane junior’s bereft husband (not yet named above) finds a second wife close to home.

Visit Matthew and click Mary Cooper’s caret and his first two wives are revealed. You will see in the screenshot above that the husband of Jane and Florence Mary appears twice.

I surmised last week that Jane may have died in childbirth and later discovered that her death was registered in the same quarter as John Robert Carter, her first and only child. The boy’s father, James Robert, waited almost six years before marrying Jane’s younger sister, Florence Mary.

The enumerator in 1901 found James working as a Foreman on a Carnaby farm. He was 29 years-old, single, and married Jane towards the end of 1904. She was 17, making the age gap between them fifteen years. When widower James married Florence, he was 19 years her senior.

History repeated itself, sadly, when James’ first child with Florence died within a few months. The couple had set up home in Octon, and with them on census night was George Allen Donkin, Florence’s youngest brother (described as “a relative”).

Just before the Second World War began, the 1939 Register located James and Florence at Castle House in Hunmanby.

Castle House Farm, Hunmanby

Photo credit: cc-by-sa/2.0 © Martin Dawes – geograph.org.uk/p/4812217

This is the house in which John William Donkin, elder brother of Jane and Florence, was born two days before Christmas, 1880. Fifty-nine years later, Jane Donkin nee Hallam was head of the household – at the age of 83.

Jane Elizabeth Carter was also at Castle House in 1939. The third daughter of James and Florence, she would marry James SEAMAN two years later. I have not been able to determine if James was born in Selby in 1916 or Pocklington in 1923. A husband nine years younger has a certain appeal – but he had the middle name William and the civil marriage record settles for plain James.

It is John William, born in Castle House, who is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard, Filey.

The parish register gives 10 Mariner’s Terrace as the last address of John and Ada.

10 Mariner’s Terrace photographed this afternoon

Water 32 · Martin’s Ravine

Every Two Years

Here are some of the rough ideas I have about human reproduction in Victorian Britain:-

The average age of women marrying for the first time was 25 (a year older for men).

The average woman therefore had about 20 years in which to deliver an average of 5 or 6 children.

The average rate of child production is one every 2 to 3 years.

The average woman buried 2 of her infants.

Jane HALLAM (yesterday’s post) was atypical on every count.

She married John DONKIN when she was seventeen. He was six years older. She gave birth to 8 children and watched four die in their first year. Twenty-three years passed between the birth of her first child and the last (when she was 41 years old), giving her a reproduction rate of a child every 2.9 years. What the crude figures don’t show is that Jane was an erratic bearer of children. When she married she was pregnant with Mary Jane. The child’s death was registered in the quarter following her birth. Six years would pass before John William was born and six more went by before Jane junior appeared. Feed these facts into the FamilySearch Tree “system” and “possible missing children” warnings are triggered.

I don’t think I have missed any children. Jane was 55 years-old in 1911 and she told the enumerator that she’d had eight children and five had died. Jane junior is the one who reached adulthood, briefly. Just like her mother, she married at seventeen but died two years later, in childbirth perhaps. I have found the birth registrations of all eight children (under variants of the Hallam name) and although I haven’t “killed off” Florence Mary yet it seems she made old bones, as did the other two survivors.

Out of curiosity, I trawled through Filey Genealogy & Connections looking for couples with eight children and calculated their “R numbers”. The results should not be taken too seriously.

The length of time taken to bring eight children into the Filey community varied from 10 to 25 years, yielding R numbers from 1.3 to 3.1. There are 20 couples in the sample and three had the “perfect score” of 2.0 – a child every two years, as regular as clockwork. In the course of the exercise I noticed a super-reproducer (no names no pack drill). Nineteen children in 22 years for an R number of 1.2. At least ten babies died but the mother reached the age of 74. She was, however, a stranger with only a tenuous connection to Filey.

I have made some progress on the Shared Tree today.

There is much still to do. Matthew must be given his first two wives and Jane junior’s bereft husband (not yet named above) finds a second wife close to home.

Wave 40 · Steamy

Filey Bay

Good Neighbours

A couple of days ago I began searching for the forebears of John William DONKIN and Ada Isabella CAMMISH. They are buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

John’s mother, Jane HALLAM, was the second of four girls born to Matthew, a Hunmanby fishmonger, and his third wife Mary COOPER. Matthew was 63 years old when he married Mary and 67 when Jane arrived in 1856. Mary was, of course, much younger than her husband – about 36 when she gave birth to Jane.

When Jane was just over a year old, the odd couple helped a young woman in distress. With other kind-hearted folk, they gave shelter and food to Betsy LYNES, shut out by her parents. I think Betsy was illegitimate, so perhaps a wicked stepfather was involved.

Three years after this sad event, the Hallam’s third child, Sarah, died aged eighteen months. A few weeks later, they buried six year old Elizabeth. In the summer of 1862 Anne Elizabeth joined the family. I have not yet discovered how long she stayed but Jane would live to see the first year or so of the Second World War.

Three of the four girls are on the FamilySearch Shared Tree but have yet to be brought together. Here is Jane –

Over the next few days, I hope to give Matthew his first two wives, and Jane her husband and their eight children.

(The doctor who carried out the postmortem on Betsy subsequently poisoned his wife and mother in law, deeds for which he was hanged on 28 July 1865.)

Mark of Man 55 · Coble Landing

Chalets and Tractor