Fathers, Lost

William Hunter BAILEY was two years old when his father failed to return home.

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John BAILEY was 28-years old, George STEPHENSON 27 and John MAJOR 35. Their bodies must have been recovered because their deaths were registered locally, but I have only found a burial record for John Major.

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William and his mother moved the few miles to Filey, where Frances died in August 1870. A few months later William married Elizabeth CRAWFORD. At the 1871 census, the couple was enumerated in Mosey’s Yard and ten years later in Providence Place, having been joined by two children, John William and Sarah Ann.

William, undaunted by his father’s fate, worked as a fisherman. Like his dad, he didn’t make old bones but I have been unable to find the cause of his death at age 34.

His headstone in Filey St Oswald’s churchyard has been moved from his grave to the north wall.

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In remembrance of FRANCES, wife of JOHN BAILEY, who died Aug 14th 1870, aged 51 years.

‘Farewell dear son, do thou earth’s days employ

To fit thee for our Father’s home of joy

Sleep on dear Mother and take thy rest

God took thee when he thought it best.’

Also, WILLIAM HUNTER BAILEY, son of the above and the beloved husband of ELIZABETH, died 16th Sep. 1884 aged 34 years.

Find the three drowned fishermen on FamilySearch Tree: John Bailey, George Stephenson and John Major.

Today’s Image

I walked along the beach to Reighton this morning as a way of remembering the solar eclipse.

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Sisters

Ann and Jane CAPPLEMAN were the last of nine children born in Filey to William and Mary née CAMMISH.

Ann married Thomas Bradley BURN in 1860 when she was 27–years old. Thomas died in 1864 and Ann married again in 1868. One of the witnesses at the marriage ceremony at St Oswald’s was Thomas JOHNSON, who had married Ann’s younger sister, Jane, three years earlier.

Jane’s marriage lasted less than seven years. She died in February 1872, leaving just one child, John William, who is referenced in verse on her headstone.

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‘Mourn not for me my friends so dear

I am not lost but sleepeth here

Mourn not for me but pity take

And love my offspring for my sake.’

Ann’s short first marriage also produced just one son, Bradley. A second boy took the BURN family name but arrived long after Thomas Bradley’s death. She then gave birth to five HUNTER children, four boys and a girl, between 1870 and 1881.

Three years after Jane’s death, Thomas JOHNSON married again. Her name? Jane CAPPLEMAN. Between 1876 and 1883, this couple brought five children into the world, four girls and a boy.

The parents of sisters Ann and Jane had about 20 personal identity numbers between them on FamilySearch Tree and I spent an hour or two today merging the duplicates. There is more work to be done but these two generations are now somewhat more approachable.

William CAPPLEMAN, father of Ann and Jane.

You may recall the Ann CAPPLEMAN who featured on the screenshot in Monday’s post.

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Here is the graveyard indication that she did not marry.

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In affectionate remembrance of ANN, daughter of WILLIAM & SARAH CAPPLEMAN,

who died May 18 1879, aged 38 years.

‘The Master is come and calleth

for thee’

I stated confidently on the screenshot, ‘This William married a Jane CAPPLEMAN’, And lo! He was the first husband of the Jane who took the place of Ann’s sister in the marriage bed of Thomas JOHNSON.

But it is also true that in May 1857 at St Oswald’s, William JENKINSON married Ann CAPPLEMAN, as indicated in the screenshot. But he was the son of Matthew and Ann née DONKIN, and she the daughter of Francis and Sarah née JENKINSON. (Matthew and Sarah were first cousins, common ancestors Robert JENKINSON and Margaret TRUCKLES.)

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‘Thy will be done’

In loving memory of WILLIAM JENKINSON, the beloved husband of

ANNIE JENKINSON of Filey, who died Dec 12 1896, aged 60 years.

‘Rest loved one, rest, our loss

Is thy eternal gain’

Also of ANNIE, wife of the above, who died in the Lord Aug 20th 1905, aged 67 years.

‘Thy will be done’

Also CHARLES HUNTER, son in law of the above and beloved husband of

SARAH ANN HUNTER, who was lost at sea March 6 1883, aged 25 years.

‘In the midst of life, we are in death’

This Ann CAPPLEMAN on FamilySearch Tree.

However, for the time being, the mistaken marriage of William Jenkinson and Ann Cappleman can still be found on FST under their duplicate IDs.

I think there is a good chance you are as confused about these various relationships as I have been the past three days. I’ll try to make things a little clearer by telling the story of ‘Wrong’ William’s sad death, and give him his rightful wife, in a day or two.

A Mixed-Up Marriage

The FamilySearch Tree system plays Guesswork Wives occasionally. It is one thing to create a person from an extracted record, and another to marry them off to some random fellow.

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This wrong William JENKINSON does not, at the moment, have any sources attached to him. I hope to put him right over the next few days but it is a tangled web. Three Ann CAPPLEMANs were born in Filey between 1838 and 1841, and three Janes of that ilk between 1843 and 1846. Five William JENKINSONs appeared on the scene between 1836 and 1844. Troublemakers all! (Nobody should be blamed for mix-ups that have occurred already – or may happen with these people in the future.)

The untangling is going to be greatly helped by the St Oswald’s Monumental Inscriptions. I have three headstones already in the queue to support the changes that must be made to the above screenshot. And one of those remembered, Charles HUNTER, should have featured in the March 6th post, The Storm & Jacky Windy.

The families of most of the drowned fishermen have some representation on FST but there wasn’t enough time in the day to fill gaps and make sound connections for this post.

At the 1871 Census, Charles was a 13-year-old fisherman. At 25 he was master of the yawl Amity (SH90), and a casualty of the March ’83 storm.

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The William JENKINSON of the screenshot drowned about three months after his wedding. Jane married again, had five children, and died aged 97 in 1941. I’ll write more about them in a future post.

On Another Coast

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© David Dixon shared under Creative Commons CC BY-SA 2.0 licence

These two cast iron iterations of Antony Gormley’s body gazed across the Elbe estuary for a while and now look from Brighton le Sands over the Crosby Channel towards North Wales.

In these waters 77 years ago, HMT Relonzo struck a mine and was sunk. There is a photograph of the vessel and a list of the nineteen crew at Wreck Site. The trawler went down near C10 Red Buoy and it seems that all the men aboard were lost. Relonzo had taken part in the Dunkirk evacuation the previous summer and in 1941 was engaged in The Battle of the Atlantic.

Frank HUNTER was one of the seamen who died on Relonzo.He was born in Hull in December 1908 to Filey-born parents George William and Elizabeth Ann née PEARSON. His memorial is in St Oswald’s churchyard and the stone also remembers his wife Lillian.

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Lillian was also born a PEARSON but I haven’t been able to determine her parentage. The following brief item appeared in The Driffield Times on 25th July 1941.

Filey Man Killed

Mrs. Hunter, of Ebenezer House, Queen Street, Filey, has received word that her husband, Frank Hunter (32), has been killed by enemy action at sea. He leaves three children.

The record for one of the children is “closed” on the 1939 Register and so may still be alive. I added Frank and his siblings to FST today but will leave it to his family to enter more recent information.

The Hands of Augustine Roulin

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In 1888, about a thousand kilometers south of Savigné l’Evȇque, the birthplace  of Father Eugène Augustine Roulin, Vincent was painting Augustine, the wife of a namesake, Arles  postman Joseph-Etienne Roulin. Father Eugène was then 28 years old and about to be ordained. He was then posted (sorry, couldn’t resist) to the monastery of Silos. For reasons unkown to me he subsequently requested a move to the English congregation of the Order of St Benedict and in October 1905 he fetched up in Filey. He served the community for 27 years before retiring because of ill-health. He spent most of his last years at Ampleforth and died in March 1939. (If you search online for images of Father Roulin you will be lucky to find one in the gallery  of Van Gogh paintings.)

20170703HUNTERgravesFiley1_1mNinety-eight years ago today Father Roulin was standing here, a Roman Catholic officiating at the funeral of a supposedly Protestant Filey fisherman. The event caused some consternation locally and in The Two Funerals of John Hunter on Looking at Filey I reproduced contemporary newspaper reports and commentary at some length.

I haven’t found a record on FamilySearch Tree for Father ROULIN but John HUNTER has at least two. One is a minimal entry triggered by his baptism that doesn’t give his mother’s full name. The other (L87F-L6H) has a warning attached pointing out his birth after his mother’s child-bearing years should have been over. Whoever created this short pedigree added thirty years to the age of Sarah WILLIS.

But was John’s mother really a WILLIS? FST says so but Kath on Filey Genealogy plumps for “Sarah (Varey) WILLIS” – with good reason.  Sarah’s mother Susannah married George WILLIS in December 1821 when she must have been heavy with child. Their son Robert was born in February 1822 and George died the following month. Kath has a note about a smallpox outbreak at the time but George, a fisherman, may have drowned.  Sarah (Varey) WILLIS was born four years later in Filey followed by a brother, Charles (Varey) WILLIS, in 1830. Edward HARRISON didn’t make an honest woman of Susannah until 1835 and they had three children together.

I searched further on FST and discovered  that George WILLIS has four IDs. Two show him in splendid isolation, linked to nobody. A third, linked to his baptism, also gives his date of death. The one ID worth developing is K2FK-1M3. It takes his male line further back than Filey Genealogy, to William WILES from Middleton on the Wolds, born 1682.

In the churchyard photo above the grave next to John’s is the resting place of his parents. The stone’s inscription reads:-

In Loving Memory of WILLIAM HUNTER the Beloved husband of

SARAH HUNTER who died 22 Nov 1881 aged 66 years

‘He suffered long, but mourned not

We watched him day by day

Grew less and less with aching heart

Until he passed away’

Also of the above SARAH HUNTER who died 7th Oct 1897 aged 74 years

‘Her end was peace’

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The photo of Father Roulin’s hands is a crop from a three-quarter length portrait, a photocopy, given to me by Kath without a date or any attributions to pass on. I joked about Father Roulin being sent to Silos but he wrote a book about the place that can be obtained at Waterstones. And from Amazon you may be able to acquire his 1931 book Vestments and Vesture: Manual of Liturgical Art.