A Troubled Family

What was Hannah HOOD thinking when she persuaded her husband to share a bedroom with her 80-year-old father?

The remains of Mr. Frank Chapman, aged 80, who met his death at Reighton, by falling from a window, was interred on Tuesday. Deceased was formerly a farmer at Gristhorpe.

Scarborough Mercury 18 December 1903

 

Hannah was about six months old and her brother George three when they were christened at the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Filey on 16 November 1865.

Twenty-three years later, George married Maria GLENTON. In 1901 they are in Gristhorpe with their three children, Charlotte Ann, 11, Robert, 8, and Eliza Jane, 2. George was sound of body, working as an agricultural labourer, and would see his father buried two years later. If he attended the funeral, he may have considered St Oswald’s churchyard a pleasant spot to rest eternally. If that was his wish, it came true a decade later.

I have not discovered the whereabouts of George or Maria in 1911, Their children were scattered. The youngest, Eliza Jane, is boarding with widow WELLBURN in Gristhorpe. Charlotte Ann is a general servant to farmer Thomas JACKSON at Osgodby, near Cayton. Robert is a “beastman” to another farmer, Charles Collins SKELTON, near Hunmanby, unaware that he will soon be asked to forfeit his life. A life remembered on the headstone of his parents, a few metres from the grave of Frank and Ann.

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In loving memory of GEORGE CHAPMAN of Gristhorpe, who departed this life April 9th 1913, aged 50 years.

‘Not gone from memory nor from love

But to the eternal Home above’

Also of MARIA, wife of the above, died Nov 11 1926, aged 67 years.

‘At rest’

Also, Pt. ROBERT CHAPMAN, son of the above, who was killed in France after four years active service, Nov 1st 1918, aged 26 years.

‘In the midst of life, we are in death

Forever with the Lord’

The life expectancy of a soldier on the Western Front was short, and for Robert to have come through three or more years of carnage to die within days of “victory” is poignant. I couldn’t find him on the CWGC database, the nearest sacrifice to November the first being an infantryman with the King’s Own Scottish Borderers. Robert isn’t to be found on the Filey War Memorial – no surprise as he was a Gristhorpe man. I looked for a photo I took of the Gristhorpe Memorial in March.

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There he is, at the bottom of the list – “K. O. Scottish Bords”. If he served with the 6th Battalion throughout the war he may have fought in a dozen battles, including the Somme, Passchendaele, Delville Wood, Zonnebeke Redoubt, Cambrai. Robert was killed during the Final Offensive in 1918. His body was identified by his cap badge, general service uniform and boots and placed in a temporary grave. With a thousand or more other comrades he was taken to the New British Cemetery at Harlebeke, near Ieper, in 1924 or 1925.

George had died in the North Riding Asylum in York, aged 50, unaware of the trials his son would soon endure. How much did Maria know of her son’s fate? Robert’s service record online is bereft of kin. She died on Armistice Day 1925 (not 1926) in the same mental hospital as her husband. What must those twelve years of widowhood have been like for her?

In 1924, Eliza Jane signed the register at the marriage of her sister to Charles Henry JACKSON, (perhaps a relative of the people Charlotte had skivvied for at Osgodby). Thirty-four years old when she married, Charlotte died childless (I think) in Scarborough, in 1949, aged 60. I don’t know what became of Eliza Jane.

Miner, Soldier, Accountant, Contractor’s Clerk

In July 1938 the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer informed readers of the marriage of Samuel Hughes DIXON, Accountant, to Olive, the eldest daughter of Charles FERRAR, of Filey. Samuel, the notice said, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Philip Dixon, of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire. He had been born in Fenton, one of the unlovely Six Towns of The Staffordshire Potteries, and at age 13 in 1901 he worked as a miner below ground, probably at Fenton Glebe Colliery.

Ten years later his presence on the North-West Frontier was noted. He was with the 2nd Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment, which had been raised in the next Pottery town in the chain, Longton. He didn’t leave the army until 1929 and so, had he stayed with the North Staffs, would have served for at least ten years in India, a couple of years in Ireland until the Free State was established, and the remainder of his army life at the regiment’s depot in Lichfield or other “home stations”.

His military conduct had been exemplary and for the last ten years he was a Company Quarter-Master Sergeant. He re-started his civilian life in Burslem, as licensee of The Legs of Man Inn in the Market Place. For eight years there were no complaints against him but early in 1937, he found himself in court, charged with supplying intoxicating liquor to two women during “non-permtted” hours.  One of the women, Elizabeth Bridgford, pleaded guilty and was fined but the evidence that she was supplied after 10pm was not strong enough to convict Samuel.

The Stipendiary Magistrate’s view that the case was nonetheless “suspicious” may have weighed heavily upon Samuel. Ten months later The Staffordshire Sentinel reported that the Wine Licence for The Legs o’Man Inn had been transferred from Samuel Hughes Dixon to Alfred William Wood.

Samuel must have quit The Potteries immediately because a couple of months later his marriage to Olive FERRAR was registered in Buckrose. Olive was forty-years-old. Samuel, aged 50, claimed to be an accountant. Eighteen months later, when the Census was taken at the beginning of the Second World War, he told the enumerator who called at 67 Muston Road that he was a Contractor’s Clerk.

Samuel died in the summer of 1952 and is buried at Cayton. His widow married again and is remembered on the FERRAR stone in St Oswald’s churchyard as Olive JACKSON. She died in 1975 aged 78, about 18 months after her youngest sister Gladys Ann BROWN. Their brother Arthur’s life had been snuffed out at nineteen while fighting for King and Country in France.

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Find the Ferrars, and Samuel, on the Shared Tree.

The Jackson Eight

Robert JACKSON, a butcher and farmer in Lebberston, had eight children with Elizabeth CLEMIT. Though both parents lived to a good age, the young ones fared less well. Three died before the age of ten, and two daughters reached their mid-twenties. Eliza seems to have been the only one to marry, and she died before her fortieth year. William’s last birthday was his sixtieth. I’m not sure yet when Charles departed this life, or if he married, but on FamilySearch Tree, he was trafficked to another couple in a distant part of the country. He was put there by “the system” so I had no compunction about rescuing him.

In St Oswald’s churchyard, there are three headstones, side by side, that remember six of the children plus their parents and Elizabeth Clemit’s father, Charles. Both FamilySearch and Filey Genealogy and Connections had records for just two of the children, so I’ve created IDs for “the missing” and put photographs of the headstones on FST as Memories.

There seems to have been nothing newsworthy about the deaths of the young Jacksons, but George and James died in the same month, December 1857, aged 7 and 4. Ann died in December 1869 and Mary Jane followed her to the grave less than three months later.

Eliza had three daughters with Police Sergeant Henry ALDEN and the middle girl, Bridget, was living with grandparents Robert and Elizabeth in 1891 when she was seventeen. I don’t know what became of her, or her sisters, Emily and Elizabeth.

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Find Robert on FamilySearch Tree.

Just Agnes from Somewhere

On my afternoon walk yesterday I bumped into the second great-granddaughter of Agnes in Glen Gardens. From the comfort of her mobility scooter, Ann was keeping an eye on her own great-granddaughter in the children’s playground. Our long-time-no-see conversation quickly turned to family history and I promised to look into one of Ann’s mysteries.

I will get to the main affair eventually (I hope) but was soon sidetracked by Agnes and Richard.

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I focused on this couple initially because they are remembered on a headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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In loving memory of RICHARD PASHBY, died Jan 28 1890, aged 50.

Also AGNES, wife of the above, died July 23 1897, aged 54.

Also FRANCES & EMILY, their daughters aged 23 & 27 years.

Also JANE HUNT, mother of the above, died Sep 23 1895, aged 91.

‘Forever with the Lord’

Also GEORGE NELSON, died in infancy.

As you can see from the screenshot, FamilySearch Tree is not very illuminating with regard to Richard and Agnes. Both are separated from their parents and neither can be pinned immediately to time or place. Record hints direct attention to useful Census returns but these haven’t yet to be attached to the pair.

Filey Genealogy & Connections is much more helpful, offering all eleven of the children that can be found in the GRO Births Index. (Infant “George Nelson“  was a grandson of Richard and Agnes.)

FG&C  gives Richard’s parents as Thomas Pashby and Jane CAMMISH but without the dates of their deaths. The MI above suggests that Thomas died quite young and Jane remarried. There is, indeed, a Free BMD record of Jane Pashby marrying Joseph HUNT in Scarborough in the December Quarter, 1856. On another fragment of pedigree awaiting connection on FST, there is a record hint for Richard’s older sister Ann, revealing the Pashby household sheltering lodger Joseph Hunt in 1851. He is a Somerset man, 12 years younger than Jane.

FG&C also does better with the birth family of Agnes, giving her parents and five siblings. Her mother, “Mrs Sarah Jackson” is a PEARSON in the GRO Births Index. All the children were born in Snainton near Scarborough. Father John was born in Ebberston, the next village westward along the present A170.

Now I’ll have to knuckle down to putting Agnes Jackson of Snainton on FST and adding her headstone photo… and joining Richard to the other section of his pedigree on the World Tree.

He Lived in a Pigsty

While searching for stories about Robert CAMMISH, owner of the yawl Jane Elizabeth I found this affecting snippet: –

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Poor lad.

The COLEMAN family presented themselves neatly in the Filey censuses of 1861 and 1871. The seemingly horrible father hailed from Suffolk and the mother from Scotland. They married in Beverley, about 25 miles or so from Filey. All seven of their children were born in Filey, in Chapel Street or on Scarborough Road. On John’s agricultural labourer’s wages, life must have been a struggle. It isn’t really a surprise that everything fell apart when the mother, Jane, died the June quarter of 1876, aged 42. And a month after James’ court appearance, his older sister Caroline died at just twenty. Their father must have been in despair.

The family fragmented. When the census was taken in 1881, Thomas, 22, was working as a general labourer in Whitby; Isaac, 16, was living in Reighton; the younger sister, Esther, was lodging in Silver Head Street, Scarborough. The undersized boy who had lived with pigs, now 15, was apprenticed in Bridlington to blacksmith Charles DOOKS. I wonder how much bigger and stronger he’d grown! About six weeks before the census was taken, James was in court again, but I’m happy to report it was a case of a biter bit.

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Five shillings then equates to about £25 now.

This is the last bit of information I’ve found concerning James. Unable to find a marriage or death registration for him makes me think that he may have emigrated. But his name surfaces in the Coleman family in 1897 when Isaac named the second child he has with Ada JACKSON after his little brother. After a spell in the army, with the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, Isaac married in 1894, was a “steelworker” in 1901 and a “general worker labourer” in 1911.

Isaac’s father, John, was at the wedding and “made his mark” in the parish register as a witness. Curiously, the mother’s maiden name on James Harris the Younger’s civil registration is CUSTANCE. I can’t explain this. The mother of Isaac’s other children is, as expected, JACKSON – except for a second John William, whose mother is also given as CUSTANCE. On the 1911 census form, John states that he and Ada had produced nine children in their 17 years of marriage, of whom two had died. These figures tally with the GRO Index of Births (and Deaths) – if the Custance children are included.

The Filey Colemans are present and correct in Filey Genealogy & Connections but were scattered about on the FamilySearch Tree. I made an effort today to bring them together. I have held back from connecting the father, John Harris COLEMAN, to his forebears because he is currently absent from the list of children born to Jeremiah and Sarah née HARRIS. There isn’t much doubt that he belongs there but I’m hoping “family” will check the records and add the Filey branch to the world tree.

A Coincidence Chain

I wrote about Robert Jenkinson WATKINSON  back in August, on the anniversary of his death in 1917 on the Western Front. Eight months before his birth, his father had been lost at sea off St Abbs Head, about 140 miles north of Filey. That family tragedy happened 126 years ago today.

Looking more closely into the event this morning, I soon discovered that Robert Jenkinson senior had not drowned from a fishing boat but from the SS Bear, Master J. HAWRIE. The cargo ship was carrying pig iron from Middlesbrough to Grangemouth and sank after a collision with SS Britannia. Twelve of her crew of 14 drowned. (Sources: Canmore and Wreck Site.)

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I wondered…

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Reverend Thomas was the incumbent at Filey for 42 years (1831-1873). He has a memorial window in St Oswald’s but the sources readily to hand only reveal him making a speech now and again and “solemnly dedicating” the first Hollon lifeboat. He perhaps wasn’t a hard act for Reverend Basil K. WOODD to follow.

Basil, remarkably, had something in common with Mrs. NORFOLK – they shared the middle name Kilvington. It isn’t immediately apparent that the two were related. Sarah’s maiden name was BARSTOW and she was born in Acomb, about 16 miles from Basil’s birthplace, Aldborough. (Although The Driffield Times notice says the Reverend JACKSON was “of Acomb” he appears to have been a native of Beverley.)

KILVINGTON, as a family name, is surely derived from a geographical location. It is very much a Yorkshire name but there is only South Kilvington in the county. Nottinghamshire has Kilvington – but not many people bearing the name in the 19th century.

Whatever, this coincidence seems to beg further investigation.

FamilySearch is, perhaps for the first time in my experience, rather unhelpful. The Reverend Thomas has several PIDs but only this one gives a reasonable starting point. Others give him the “wrong” spouse and somebody else’s children. The system seems to be culpable, rather than human contributors to the World Tree, but it is still a mess to be cleared up.

I promised in August to “expand” Robert Jenkinson WATKINSON the Younger’s family on FST but seem to have done next to nothing since then. There are not enough hours in the day!