Researching More Broadley

One thing led to another. Wondering when the row of houses on Filey Foreshore that includes St Kitts was built, I looked for old maps. This is how the site looked in 1851.

The first block of The Crescent had been built but the South Pampletines undercliff from Cargate Hill south to Mouse Haven must have looked like the Nuns Walk does today. The darker patch where the X is may have been a small pond. I think I have marked the location of No.2 The Foreshore accurately but you can check by visiting the National Library of Scotland to get a feel for the area on an early 1” Ordnance Survey map. The initial surveying was done around the time John Bourryeau BROADLEY died but the map was not published until about twenty years later. Survey teams may have returned in the 1870s and 80s to find houses on The Foreshore that were not there in the late 1860s. Look here and get your bearings by moving the transparency slider. Note the present-day “pond” where children paddle in the summer months.

Even at this small scale, you should be able to roughly locate St Kitts. But head to the North Yorkshire County Council website and look at their Historic Map. Zoom out from Northallerton Station and scroll eastwards to Filey. When you reach the foreshore area zoom in until the building plan appears, outlined in red. The Paddling Pool will be a visual cue and the historic base will look very similar to the 1851 map shown above.

The house from which John B. Broadley departed in 1867 is architecturally very similar to the one he occupied in Scarborough in 1861. This made me think he may have used his inherited wealth to build five houses by the sea in New Filey and occupy one, naming it St Kitts because he knew where his bread had been buttered. Perhaps someone has the deeds of one of the houses, giving a year of construction that would support or trash this hypothesis. I now think the houses were built after John’s death and it is just a coincidence that one was named St Kitts.

John and his family are represented on the FamilySearch Shared Tree here but the woman responsible for his middle name is not related to him by blood. She is the wife of his granduncle John.

Elizabeth was the eldest of eleven girls born to sugar plantation owners Zachariah BOURRYEAU and Sophia SHAW. The girls had one brother, John, and when he died only Elizabeth, Hannah and Mary appear to have been beneficiaries of his will and the ensuing sale of the Simon estates in Grenada and St Kitts. Elizabeth had been married to John Broadley for thirteen years when her brother died and the journey made by her portion to later members of the Broadley family has been difficult to follow. Cutting to the chase, John the Lancer is arguably a Broadley alpha male in Burke’s Landed Gentry, but in reality, it was his aunt Sophia, Lady of the Manor in Welton, who owned thousands of acres in the East Riding. She was much revered.

On the day of the funeral, Sophia’s nephew Captain Broadley rode in the first mourning coach with his wife Eleanor, Mr W. H. Harrison and Mrs Sykes. William Henry HARRISON was the husband of Sophia’s younger sister Mary – and he inherited the lionesses’ share, including Welton House (page 2 if you follow this link to an East Riding Museums pdf).

My research yesterday led me to other Broadley men of war.

Broadley Harrison

John Henry William Harrison-Broadley

Squadron Leader John Harrison-Broadley

Death or Glory

He died over 150 years ago and his small headstone doesn’t look Victorian.

John’s middle name is perfect for mangling. Knowing there is a French connection in his past, I am going to settle for BOURRYEAU. It is a minority spelling in the sources but the half dozen or more variants found are unconvincing.

It is clearly a matter of pride that he was a Captain of the 17th Lancers. He must have been a boy soldier to have achieved this rank at the age of twenty-four. He was 37 and had left the army when he married. About four months after his wedding day he would have received news of the deaths of over a hundred of his former brothers-in-arms. The Russians cut the Light Brigade lancers down as they charged into the Valley of Death. Not the Scots Greys. And photographer Roger Fenton’s Death Valley is some distance from the site of the carnage.

17th Lancers, cap badge, by GMJ – http://www.paoyeomanry.co.uk, Public Domain

John was born into a wealthy family, the money coming mainly from inheritance. Made initially by African slaves in West Indies plantations and banked by Zachariah Bourryeau, huge sums were bequeathed to his son John and three daughters. There was property too and John BROADLEY, who had married Elizabeth Bourryeau, found himself in possession of Blyborough Hall in Lincolnshire. I am not sure how the Broadley family came to buy hundreds of acres of East Yorkshire, but John the Lancer received a share. Rents and his army pension were enough to fund a three-storey dwelling in Trafalgar Square, Scarborough – plenty big enough for a man, his wife and three servants. I have not found evidence of the move to Filey after 1861 and there isn’t a last address in the EYFHS St Oswald’s Burials Survey. One of the slaver’s plantations, however, was on the island of St Kitts and there is a house with this name on Filey’s Foreshore Road (aka The Beach).

Photographed today

This may be where John Bourryeau Broadley spent his final years before congestion of the brain took him. (What we might call “cerebral haemorrhage” nowadays.) His effects at probate were valued at less than £1,500 (about £130,000 today).

John’s wife was a widow for 42 years. She died in London in 1909.

More information online –

Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slavery

South Ella Hall, Anlaby (pdf): The Broadley Family