Fishing for Hoppers

The first HOPPER in the Filey Census is widowed fisherman Timothy, age 75 and heading a King Street household in 1841containing five people I have classified as boarders/lodgers – four members of a WILLIS family and a widow, Fanny MORGAN. In 1861, Bridlington born Robert Hopper, sailmaker, is living in Hope Street with his wife Annie Elizabeth, three children and Annie’s sister Susan “BERRYMAN”. In Filey Genealogy & Connections there is a gathering of Patrington Hoppers. The connection of these folk to Filey isn’t immediately clear but their descendants increased greatly and scattered. You can follow them, some to the United States (in the 21st century) on FamilySearch Tree, starting from William and Mary Ann née FEWSON.

There is only one Hopper remembered in St Oswald’s churchyard but the first headstone of 2019 to which I’ve turned my attention has seen me dancing around other Hoppers for much of the day.

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Thomas Holmes JOHNSON doesn’t appear to have representation on FST, neither does his father, or grandfather Frederick HOPPER. Frederick, a fisherman and lifeboatman, was born in Hull but enumerated in Easington in 1861 so I’m expecting to connect him to the Patrington branch. If I am to tag the above headstone photo on FST I will probably need to bring a large troupe of Hoppers together on the World Tree. It may take some time.

(Until this afternoon I didn’t know that you really fish WITH hoppers. It is a variety of dry fly that bamboozles trout.)

Out at Sea

Four big lights on Alfa Italia cut through the murk late this afternoon.  Sarpen and Thornbury remain at anchor in Bridlington Bay and a few miles further south two more tankers, Delta Star and Baltic Favour are awaiting orders. When I checked Ship AIS at lunchtime I noticed Happy Pelican was making good speed to Grangemouth and had to smile, its filthy cargo of LPG notwithstanding.

Down Under

Radio NZ reported yesterday that 2018 was the hottest year since New Zealand records began.

Veteran climate scientist Jim Salinger has calculated the mean annual land surface temperature in 2018 was 13.5 degrees Celsius, which was 0.85C above the 1981-2010 average.

This was “a smidgeon” hotter than the previous warmest year on record, 2016, which was 0.84C above normal.

January, March, July and December were all at least 1C above normal, with January being a massive 3.2C above average, the hottest month ever.

Overall, the country has heated up by 1.3C since records began in 1867, Prof Salinger said.

Read the article here.

I checked the Wellington International temperature data downloaded from Weather Underground and found that the capital’s 2018 was the hottest of the last ten years, and just 0.05°C warmer than 2016. A smidgeon. The Wellington average annual temperature was, as you might expect, higher than the national figure, at 14.25°C. Auckland would no doubt be warmer still, and Invercargill cooler. What will 2019 be like?

An Odd Couple

I don’t have the figures, but I don’t think it was unusual for women in Victorian Britain to be pregnant on their wedding day. (Those that weren’t may have been breastfeeding.)

When Ann TEMPLE married for the first time in 1875 she was 34 years old, the mother of five children and probably pregnant. I haven’t been able to find a birth registration for her sixth child, Ellen (or for her third, Mary Ann), but she would give birth in marriage to two more.

The father of all her children was almost certainly James BULMER, the eldest son of Graves Bulmer and Ann Hudson (post Horse Trading last Sunday).

In 1861, James was 26-years-old and unmarried, farming 120 acres at Reighton, near Filey, and employing 4 servants, one of whom was Ann, his housekeeper.

Ten years later, still at Moor Farm, Ann has three children bearing her name, aged 6 down to two and she continues to be a servant to unmarried James. (A fourth child, John her eldest, was away on Census night.)

William came along in 1872 and three years later James and Ann decided to wed.

Filey Genealogy & Connections has given both of them a previous spouse but the marriage register (via Find My Past) clearly shows their single status.

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The family seems to have moved to Filey before the wedding and in 1881 they are all together in Queen Street. Eighth and last child, Hannah, was born in 1884. The five children who had previously gone by “Temple” have all taken the Bulmer name, though it seems unlikely they were formally adopted.

As indicated above, two of the children may not have been registered at all, and none, as far as I can tell, was baptised. The scarcity of sources and the name changes have meant the family’s representation on FamilySearch Tree has been minimal. I have put Ann’s first five children on the World Tree with an “unknown spouse”, but acknowledging James’ probable paternity in notes. I had to create records for several children because “the system” didn’t recognize them. I created a Mary Ann TEMPLE ID but she is already on the Tree as a BULMER. I’ll do a merge later using the existing ID because it links to her husband, Thomas Henry JOHNSON, and some of her children.  There is a Johnson family headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, broken alas.

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In loving memory of TOM HENRY, the beloved husband of MARY JOHNSON, died Feb 8th 1932, aged 65 years.

Peace, Perfect Peace

Also of the above MARY JOHNSON, died June 16th 1944 aged 78 years, also of

BEATRICE ELLEN, beloved wife of their son HENRY JOHNSON, died March 17th 1947 aged 47 years

Also of LOUISA MARY, daughter of the above T.H. AND M. JOHNSON, died August 15th 1962 aged 65 years.

Also of the above HENRY JOHNSON, died 20th February 1965 aged 70 years;

Also THOMAS GLAVES (sic), son of the above T.H. AND M. JOHNSON, killed in the Great War April 10th 1918, aged 19 years.

Today’s Image

Bland’s Cliff in Scarborough is named after the Quaker, John BLAND, who lived on the steep street at the beginning of the 19th century. I think this may be him on FamilySearch Tree. It is an intriguing Pedigree anyway, leading to far-flung places.

Centenary

The War Memorial in Murray Street has been given a facelift for the hundredth Remembrance Day. I took a photo on the way home from the supermarket a couple of days ago.

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Mrs Annie CULLEY was given the honour at the Memorial’s unveiling ceremony in 1921. Two of her sons had died in the war.

BrightH_newThe bronze panels have been buffed and some of the blue-green patina has been replaced by brownish tones. Harry BRIGHT was not Filey-born but came to the town before the war and courted a local girl. When the war began he went back to his home area to enlist in the Hunts Cyclists – and the unit was posted to Filey. He has a page on the Wiki, to which I’ll add some of the information I’ve turned up this week.

Harry was already on the FamilySearch Tree but is still without his wife and son. One curious aspect of his brief service details on the CWGC website is the absence of any mention of parents or spouse. If you read the Wiki entry you’ll see that I’m not completely certain I have the right man. But Harry from Huntingdon came from a large family, and after his father died young his mother married a widower. At the 1911 census, Harry was in a household with five half and four full brothers and sisters.

Harry’s widow remarried too and had five children with John William HOLMES. She died aged 43 (or 44) and is buried in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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Note: The link to the CWGC website is throwing up run-time errors, possibly a temporary glitch but I’ve removed it. If you are interested, search for Harry Bright 20702, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Yawl ‘Trio’

SH76 Trio was built by Robert SKELTON in Scarborough in 1859. Her first owners were three of the TINDALL family, Alexander, William and James; shipbuilder, sailmaker, and banker respectively. The last change of ownership noted by Captain Syd was in 1881, four Scarborough fishermen, Robert ALLEN senior & junior, James and John ALLEN, took possession. At some point thereafter Thomas Avery JOHNSON became skipper and he was aboard with two of his sons in 1895 when a gale blew up in the North Sea, off Spurn Point. The crew on a passing  Hull boat saw three of Trio’s fishermen washed overboard by a huge wave but could do nothing to effect a rescue.

The six men on board Trio were all from Filey and a pall fell over the town when news of her difficulties was received.

British Armed Forces and Overseas Deaths and Burials (The National Archives) gives 14 May as the date of the men’s demise. Five are remembered on headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard. Two are recorded as having been lost in the gale of 16 and 17 May, and the three JOHNSONs as having drowned on the 16th.

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Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN
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Francis CAMMISH
1895_JOHNSONInscriptionDrowned
Thomas Avery, Francis Cappleman, and William JOHNSON

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Cappleman, M (Wiggy) 1891‘Matty Wiggy’ CAPPLEMAN played for the Filey Red Stars FC and was photographed with the team in 1891 when he was 18-years-old. The insurance money from the benefit clubs was supplemented by local fund-raising events. The following was noted in The Scarborough Mercury on Friday 30th August 1895.

Dr. Spark, the Leeds City Organist, gave a very charming recital at Filey Church on Monday for the benefit of the widows and orphans of the fishermen lost in the Trio. The collection realized between £5 and £6. The programme was com­posed of some of the choicest illustrations of the gems of Silas, Tours, Mendelssohn, and Gounod, and Dr. Spark gave two or three of his own com­positions, which were very much appreciated. “The Vesper Hymn” and the finale introducing national themes by Purcell, Arne, and Dr. Bull afforded the veteran musician an opportunity of showing his wonderful skill as an executant and of displaying the passion and dramatic instinct which have always characterized his playing.

There were only two of the lost six on FamilySearch Tree when I looked a few days ago and in the process of gathering in the others I ran into some difficulties. I had hoped to point you to more complete pedigrees!

Francis Cappleman JOHNSON

Matthew Crawford CAPPLEMAN

Robert EDMOND was the member of the crew without a remembrance in the churchyard – and he isn’t represented yet on FST. Find him on Filey Genealogy & Connections.

Dr. SPARK, a Devon man, makes a couple of appearances on FST – but as an only child without a mother. At the 1881 Census, he was living in Eccleshill, Bradford, with wife Elizabeth and son Thomas, age 23 and a law student. William Spark died in Leeds less than two years after his Filey recital.

[S. S.] Wesley’s articled pupil from his Exeter days, William Spark (1823-97) went with him to Leeds where he became Organist of St. George’s and then, after designing the Town Hall organ, Borough Organist from 1859 to 1897. His brother Frederick was a guiding light of the Leeds Triennial Festival and William played at each Festival between 1874 and 1886. Grove’s Dictionary dismisses his compositions as “numerous but unimportant”. Unimportant or not, they were nevertheless widely performed. His oratorio Immanuel figured in the Leeds Festival of 1877 and Spark’s recitals in and around Doncaster in the 1870s and 1880s (he appeared in the town as early as February 1853, conducting thirty voices of his own Leeds Madrigal and Motet Society) included his Concertstuck, a Fantasie and (several times) Variations and Fugue on Jerusalem the Golden, also solo songs and excerpts from Immanuel. Spark’s Yorkshire Exhibition March was written in 1875 for the grand organ in the Exhibition building. He wrote and lectured tirelessly, his lecture subjects in Doncaster at that same period including “The Vocal Music of the Victorian Era“, “The Minstrelsy of Old England“, “National Ballad Music of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales” and “Glees and Partsongs“, the illustrations for the latter talk including at least one of his own compositions. He edited books of music by others for organists to play.

Source.

HMT ‘Cobbers’

The Royal Navy requisitioned FV Cobbers at the beginning of the Second World War and on this day 1941 she was patrolling the North Sea, a few miles east of Lowestoft. German aircraft attacked and sank her and eleven of her crew were killed. The bodies of Second Hand Leonard Herbert BEAN of Milford Haven and Seaman Albert STRANEX were not recovered and are remembered at the Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial in Belle Vue Park, Lowestoft.

CammishJ2Among those taken home for burial was John ‘Jack’ CAMMISH, baptized in St Oswald’s on 25th October 1916 His father’s name is not recorded and, given the year, it seems his mother, Winifred, may have had a brief encounter with a soldier billeted in the town.

Jack’s War Grave marker is associated in the Crimlisk Survey with plot F72 and the East Yorkshire Family History Society, Part Three, 1835,  page 18, adds the post-1977 burials of Winifred and her husband  Thomas NEWLOVE (Jack’s stepfather).

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For reasons unknown to me, the CWGC memorial has been placed about 15 grave plots away in Area E, in front of the now fallen stone remembering Margaret, Robert, and Annie Elizabeth CAMMISH. Robert, known as “Chorus”, was Jack’s second cousin 3 times removed from common ancestor John CAPPLEMAN and third cousin twice removed from William CAMMISH and Elizabeth WRIGHT.

I went along to the churchyard this morning to photograph the family headstone.

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I found Winifred on FST a couple of days ago and allocated Jack a PID [LBQL-H6S]. He has a number of living descendants so I will leave the family to add wife Evelyn and make the connections to her JOHNSON family.

I discovered this afternoon that Jack’s pedigree goes way, way back.  Though he may not have known who his father was, and died an “ordinary seaman”, he has some astonishing forebears – if the information presented on FST  can be verified, that is.

“History would be a wonderful thing – if it were only true.”

Leo Tolstoy

In a couple of previous posts, I have referred to hitting a motherlode pedigree on FST, and know that once you meet an ancestor from the upper echelons of society you will soon enter the realms of kings and queens. If you are curious and have an hour to spare, start with Jack and see where following your nose takes you. It will be more enjoyable if you don’t take your skepticism along for the ride.

I don’t want to spoil the adventure by suggesting who you should look out for but, if you have missed him by the time you arrive in the Holy Land at the time of Christ, you might want to backtrack to check out “El Cid”, Jack being a warrior and all.

Accidents and Alcohol

StationApproachFiley1_8mOn this day in 1869, a passenger train from Hull was approaching Filey about 3 pm. The driver was “in the habit of running down the incline from Hunmanby at considerable speed” and,  a second or two after passing under the Donkey Bridge, he noticed the signal protecting the station was set at danger. (The signal may have been in the same place as the one you can see in the photo, but distances given in the accident investigation report suggest it was a hundred yards or so further on.) At the bridge, he had shut off steam and whistled for the tender and guard’s brakes to be applied, and as he passed the signal he reversed steam and set the sand pipes going, slowing the train from 40 to ten miles per hour. He hit a stationary coal train on the downline just south of the station with quite a thump, throwing a couple of coal wagons off the track. Thankfully, none of the passenger carriages derailed. (Of the 150 people aboard, fifteen would complain of injuries.) The driver was not in a fit state to be questioned immediately, possibly because he was inebriated rather than hurt. A month later the Report stated, “This man appears to have been drinking since1st January 1870, and has now been dismissed from the service of the company.”

The passenger train had been running late so there was even less of an excuse for the station staff to have allowed the coal train to remain in its dangerous position.  The station master claimed to have given instructions for its removal well ahead of the expected arrival of the Hull train; the underlings, somewhat feebly, claimed not to have received said instructions. The danger should have been clear to everyone.

The Report doesn’t name names but the culpable station master was Charles MILNER, born in Huddersfield in 1807. He married in Gloucestershire and moved several times thereafter with his growing family. The first two children were born in Cheltenham, and the next three in Yorkshire at Sinderby, Pickering, and Starbeck.

Charles not only kept his job in Filey after the accident but his only son, Charles George, was stationmaster at Seamer in 1873 when they were both up before the court for “refusing to pay poor rates”. (The case was dismissed on a technicality.)

Eight years later the census finds the father retired in West Parade, Filey, with wife Mary and single daughter Jemima, aged 26. Charles George left it late to marry. He was 39 when he hitched his wagon to 25-year-old Asenath GREENHELD,  in Scarborough. Nine months or so later their only child, Bertha Frances, was born. Charles George left the railway company but not the rails. He worked as a salesman for a book publisher. The 1881 census catches him in an Exeter lodging house with a motley crew of wanderers, commercial travelers in hardware, “stuff goods”, fancy stationery – with a Clerk in Holy Orders to keep them honest, for a while at least.

Charles senior died in April 1886 and the following year Charles George moved his small family to Eastbourne in Sussex, where he bought a coal merchant’s business.  A few days before Christmas 1889 he went out for the evening on his own. At the Gildredge Hotel he had a whiskey, or maybe it was a gin, and ordered a joint of beef. He talked about “strikes and business” with a man who would give evidence at the coroner’s inquest.

When I went away I left him in the smoking-room talking to Mr. Turton and to little Mr. Moore who used to be coachman at Compton-place. I never saw deceased in a public house before. I was surprised to see him there. I think he was quite sober.

The jury found that the death was purely accidental, and “not brought about by intoxication”.

Two young men about town witnessed Charles Milner the younger’s death. One of them, Mr. G. BRADFORD said:-

I live at 9 Susan’s –road. Gilbert said to me, “Hallo! Here is one copped it already.” He then halloaed out, “Hallo! Old man, don’t attempt that. You can’t do it.” He said that because he saw deceased was close to the steps. Deceased made a grab at the pillar post to steady himself in going down or to save himself from falling. He fell at once. I went for the police, leaving Gilbert with deceased.

Charles had not fallen far but his neck was broken and he died before Dr. J.H. EWART arrived at the scene. He told the inquest that there was no evidence that Charles had imbibed a “great quantity” of alcohol.

One of the Jury, a Mr. COOMBER, suspected foul play and refused to sign the inquisition but it seems the verdict of accidental death was readily accepted by the people of the town

Great sympathy is felt for deceased’s family. The unanimous testimony of his friends is that he was a man of extremely temperate habits…

Old man? Charles George was 54 when he died. Had he made it to 65 he could have played a proud father role in the audience when the Eastbourne Philharmonic performed Sir Frederick Bridge’s “grand setting of Rudyard Kiplings patriotic ode” The Flag of England. Bertha Frances Milner was one of the sopranos in the choir.

Sources: North Eastern Railway accident report; Poor rates case, Driffield Times 31 May 1873, ‘Fatal Accident to an Eastbourne Coal Merchant’, Eastbourne Gazette, 25 December 1889, ‘The Flag of England’ Concert¸Eastbourne Gazette, 14 February 1900.

I have made a start connecting disparate MILNERs on the FamilySearch Tree.

Too Many Cooks

On the 22nd October 1915, the Scarborough Mercury reported that Percy COOK, confectioner of West Avenue, Filey,  had been fined 10 shillings at the Police Court for “not having had lights properly shaded”. (I guess the authorities were afraid of Zeppelin raids and needed to set an example.)

Life was sweets for Percy and his occupation should have earned him the respect of the town’s children. It seems to have done the opposite. A few years ago Martin Douglas told me of a nasty rhyme that urchins would hurl at Percy. (Martin heard it from his mother.) They would enter his shop, chant the verse and make a quick exit, pursued by Percy.

Percy Cook said come and have a look

At my old chocolate shop,

The scales are rusty,

The chocolates are fusty,

And you’ve gone off yer nut.

(Not the best advertisement for British education if the last line referred to Percy’s mental state.)

Percy died in 1944, almost twenty years after his wife Mary Jane née MOODY. The couple married late, aged 33 and 40 respectively, and did not have little angels of their own.

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In loving memory of MARY, beloved wife of PERCY COOK, entered into rest Sep. 27th 1925, aged 57.

Go thou improve the present hour,

Be thankful for the past,

And let thy future movement tend

To calm and soothe the last.

Also of the above PERCY COOK, died June 10th 1944, aged 71.

On Filey Genealogy & Connections Percy stands alone. He was one of at least eight children born to John Frederick Cook, a cashier and bookkeeper, and Catherine JOHNSON. At the 1911 Census, remarkably, six of the siblings were living together at 1 St Paul’s Road in Bradford. All were unmarried. Ten years earlier, widowed Catherine ruled a roost of seven children, one of them Percy, at Cliff Bridge Place, Scarborough. He was the only one to fly the nest during the next decade.

So, why too many Cooks, given this generation’s unwillingness to submit to the genetic imperative? Well, an hour or two of sleuthing, brings in 15 MOODYs, who connect with several Filey fishing families (BAYES, COWLING, SCALES). FG &C has these folk but to check them all out on FamilySearch Tree and add the West Riding COOKs is a daunting task.

I noticed in passing one source that elaborated on the Bradford address, labeling it “Manningham Hall”. This seemed rather grand and I wondered if our humble confectioner had been something of a black sheep. In 1901 his sister Evelin (various spellings) was pursuing the same trade but ten years later told the census enumerator that she was a lodging house keeper.  A younger brother headed the St Paul’s household in 1911 and the Find My Past transcription gives his occupation as a “Trains Merchant”. Inspection of the page image reveals he dealt in pianos, as did brother Vernon William Alexander. A noble occupation, romantic even, but the world was changing and in 1939 Sydney had to file for bankruptcy.

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I looked again for a foothold on FamilySearch Tree and found Mary Jane MOODY Cook’s mother, Ann KNAGGS. Someone to build on…another day, perhaps.

A few words about Today’s Image. The concrete jumble below Flat Cliffs/Primrose Valley Holiday Park is the remains of a short promenade that was, I think, still functional in the 1950s. I have seen an old postcard showing an ice cream van parked on it. I haven’t discovered the purpose of the concrete “rings” yet. Someone must know.