Three Sisters

Sarah Ann, Mary and Grace were born to Arthur COULSON and Jane ATKINSON between 1825 and 1833. They had an older brother, William, but he died in 1860, aged 37.

GateHouseFarm_BingIn 1851 Arthur was farming 104 acres at The Gate House a little to the north of Lebberston village. The family unit was in residence, complete, with two farm labourers living in. A year after William’s death the Coulsons were still together, but Arthur had only 12 acres in Gristhorpe.

Arthur died in 1869 and his widow appears to have sold the farm. The 1871 census shows Jane at the same address as a “retired farmer” with two unmarried daughters. Mary had left home after marrying John SIXTON, a few months before her father died.

I mentioned in an earlier post that farmers married late. John, a bachelor, was 57 and Mary 41 when they teamed up to farm 56 acres at Gristhorpe.

By 1881 the sisters were orphans and the census indicates that Arthur’s land hadn’t been sold but rented out. Sarah Ann and Grace were living together as “Land Owners”. It seems unlikely that the rent from 12 acres would have kept the sisters so perhaps they had inherited the Gate House land too.

John Sixton died in 1885 and in 1891 the three sisters were living together in Londesborough Road, Scarborough. The exact address isn’t given but at the 1901 and 1911 censuses, Mary was resident at No. 28, three doors away from the CARR sisters (24 June post A Visitor).

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Grace died in 1897 and Sarah Ann in 1899. The three sisters are together in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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The inscriptions are difficult to read. Mary is with John on the left; Grace and Sarah Ann to the right. The graves of their parents are almost in the line of sight through the gap between the stones, near the church.

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I have only just made a start on the Coulson pedigree on FST. I’ll put all four stones on as Memories as soon as I can but for now, you can find the family, in isolation and without the Sixton connection, here.

Finding a Jewel

On my walk this morning, I saw this insect –

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I haven’t been able to identify it.

 

 

The Jackson Eight

Robert JACKSON, a butcher and farmer in Lebberston, had eight children with Elizabeth CLEMIT. Though both parents lived to a good age, the young ones fared less well. Three died before the age of ten, and two daughters reached their mid-twenties. Eliza seems to have been the only one to marry, and she died before her fortieth year. William’s last birthday was his sixtieth. I’m not sure yet when Charles departed this life, or if he married, but on FamilySearch Tree, he was trafficked to another couple in a distant part of the country. He was put there by “the system” so I had no compunction about rescuing him.

In St Oswald’s churchyard, there are three headstones, side by side, that remember six of the children plus their parents and Elizabeth Clemit’s father, Charles. Both FamilySearch and Filey Genealogy and Connections had records for just two of the children, so I’ve created IDs for “the missing” and put photographs of the headstones on FST as Memories.

There seems to have been nothing newsworthy about the deaths of the young Jacksons, but George and James died in the same month, December 1857, aged 7 and 4. Ann died in December 1869 and Mary Jane followed her to the grave less than three months later.

Eliza had three daughters with Police Sergeant Henry ALDEN and the middle girl, Bridget, was living with grandparents Robert and Elizabeth in 1891 when she was seventeen. I don’t know what became of her, or her sisters, Emily and Elizabeth.

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Find Robert on FamilySearch Tree.

A Missing Marriage

The funeral of Ann ALDEN took place 102 years ago. She was buried close to her son William, who had died eleven years earlier, and her yearling nephew William Edwin. (A cross marks their spot.)

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On the 1911 census form, William wrote that he had been married for 46 years and that he and Ann had eight children, of whom one had died. I have found the birth registrations of seven children, so one is missing.

I have been unable to find a civil or parish record of the marriage, so that is missing too.

Ann’s firstborn, Joseph, arrived on 11 April 1865, 45 years and 51 weeks before the 1911 census. William’s calculations may have been misjudged but I could not turn up a marriage in England and Wales in 1863 or 1864.

A woman called Ann Raine did, however, marry in Driffield in the last quarter of 1864. This town is not many miles from Lebberston, where the Aldens lived for most of their married life. This Ann’s husband was either Thomas BOYES or William HOLLAND. Before you write both fellows off, say Alden and Holland a few times, aloud. It is a stretch, I know, but perhaps the clerk was hard of hearing.

William and Ann’s children are no trouble to the Scarborough Registrar, though the mother’s maiden surname is not always right as RAIN. So the missing marriage registration is odd. A cursory search for Holland children between 1864 and 1870 found none in the East Riding of Yorkshire. In the same period, Driffield saw an influx of BOYES (both sexes), some of them the offspring of the aforementioned Thomas and his wife Martha STOCKELL.

Marriages Dec 1864
Boyes  Thomas    Driffield  9d 571
Holland  William    Driffield  9d 571
Raine  Ann    Driffield  9d 571
Stockell  Martha    Driffield  9d 571

Source: Free BMD

Find Ann on FamilySearch Tree.

Desert Rat, Desert Fox

Libya

This satellite view of a small square of Libya, where rock and sand meet the Mediterranean Sea, is in the vicinity of El Agheila (Al Uqaylah). After Operation Compass routed the Italians in North Africa, the Allied Forces rested in this area – until Erwin Rommel’s infant Afrika Korps arrived to send them packing on this day 1941.

Cecil SIMPSON was born at Cayton and baptized at St Oswald’s, Filey, on 6th March 1918. He was, therefore, 21 years old when the Second World War began.  I don’t know how soon he joined the army but he was with the 1st Battalion Royal Northumberland Fusiliers when a force commanded by The Desert Fox ended his life.

Cecil is remembered on the Alamein Memorial in Egypt (located about 1,000 kilometers from where he died), on the Gristhorpe Memorial in Filey Parish, and on his parents’ headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard.

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The pedigree of this branch of the Simpsons is not extensive on Filey Genealogy & Connections – and I have struggled today to find forebears on FST to whom he can be readily linked.

 

John Robert Bell

John was born in Scarborough in 1893 and was living with his family at 12 St John’s Avenue in 1901. Ten years later the family home was Highfield Cottage, Lebberston Cliff (where the Blue Dolphin Holiday Park is now) but John, 17, seems to have moved away from the parish.

In the summer of 1918, he was with the 1st Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment in the Somme region of France, in Rawlinson’s  Fourth Army. I don’t know for sure how he came to be wounded but think he may have been with Braithwaite’s IX Corps fighting for the village of Épehy on the 18th September. This was one of a number of Battles for the Hindenburg Line – as allied forces pushed the German Army back into their own country. The village was taken that day but the fighting was fierce. John Robert “died of wounds” on the 25th.

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This inscription is on a headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, Filey. His grave is in the Brie British Cemetery.

There are no “honoured memories” of John Robert in Filey Church or on the War Memorial in Murray Street. I haven’t found him on the Scarborough Memorial on Oliver’s Mount and he isn’t represented on the Gristhorpe (Filey Parish) Memorial either.

Initially, I found only a grandmother and two great grandparents on FamilySearch Tree but I have added his parents and siblings. His older brother, Albert Edgar, died aged 20 in 1905 but seven children of Richard BELL and Sarah Ann MOORE may have married and had children. Perhaps “family” will add some Memories to FST sometime.