A Dangerous Dog

The name of the animal is long forgotten but the owners will forever be known as Filey’s most illustrious residents. In August 1901 Dame Madge Kendal and her husband were away, treading the boards when their pet decided to play with matches. The Scarborough Evening News told the story.

A fire broke out on Sunday night [25th] at The Lodge on The Crescent, Filey, occupied by Mr and Mrs Kendal. A visitor was walking in the Crescent Gardens about seven in the evening, and observed flames issuing from one of the bedroom windows of a house at the far end of The Crescent, known as South Crescent Lodge. He immediately gave the alarm. The only occupants of the house were Miss Margery Kendal and the servants, Mr and Mrs Kendal being in town fulfilling a theatrical engagement. A good supply of water was easily procurable, and the flames were extinguished before the arrival of the local fire brigade. On an examination of the room by Sergeant Smith and a constable, who were on the scene immediately after the outbreak, it was found that a dog had been playing with a box of matches in the bedroom and had caused them to become ignited. The mattress and bedding were burnt, and the carpets, dressing table, and some books were scorched. The damage is estimated at about £10. A strong wind was blowing at the time, but the prompt action of the servants and police prevented the flames from spreading to other parts of the extensive and valuable premises.

A few months earlier the caretakers were the only occupants of the villa. Their names are given as James Jackson SMITH born Flintham, and Mary Jane Jackson SMITH born White Notley, both aged 50. James has a substantial headstone in the churchyard, all to himself, and its inscription reveals him to be a few years older than his census entry suggests.

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In loving memory of JAMES JACKSON SMITH who fell asleep Dec 9 1916, aged 74 years.

‘The Lord is my Shepherd’

James’ wife may have been older too, and her middle name was Ann, not Jane. If I seem uncertain it is because a Flintham/White Notley couple must have married in 1870 because at the 1891 Census they were enumerated in Northfleet, Kent with a son, Edward Jackson SMITH, 21. Father was working as a Foreman on the railway, the son as a tramway conductor. Disconcertingly, Mary Ann THOMPSON had married a plain James in 1870, and a Mary Ann NEWMAN married James Jackson SMITH in Chelsea in 1889. FamilySearch Tree has Miss Newman (MFVP-FBP), born 1850 in White Notley, with her parents John and Jane but as yet unmarried. Trouble ahead.

The “famous” people in this post are also problematic on FamilySearch Tree. Find them here, with just one of their children. I expect they may put in better performances elsewhere on the World Tree but, sigh, that just means a deal of merging has to be done. I hope there will be more instances of light relief, though. Today I was surprised to find that  William Hunter Grimston’s occupation is given as “Comedian” in the marriage register – the same line of work as Margaret Shafto ROBERTSON’s father. (Search online for Dame Madge KENDAL for lots of photographs. Check out Old White Lodge for some fascinating inside stories.)

A man, in disguise, who attended one of Dame Madge’s theatrical performances has a somewhat more substantial pedigree on FST.

South Crescent Villa is now The White Lodge Hotel.

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(Today’s Image of Filey Bay and Muston Sands was taken from the corner of Glen Gardens, a stone’s throw from The White Lodge.)

Corruption and Lies

I noticed several faded stickers on Scarborough lamp posts yesterday morning.

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The Borough of Scarborough incorporates Whitby, Filey, and several villages. It is widely accepted that whatever wealth finds its way into Council coffers is spent disproportionately on the old Queen of the Yorkshire Coast. There must also be some “wastage”.

Putting the corruption of the present UK government aside, it took no time at all to deliver its First Big Lie yesterday. Many people making their way to the Free Tommy Robinson march heard public announcements on the London Underground that the event had been canceled. I think a tabloid newspaper printed this “fact”.

Major news outlets misrepresented (smeared) the people attending the march, and woefully underestimated the numbers on the streets. If they wanted to alienate at least half of the UK’s population, they had a very successful day.

There were “clashes”, regrettably, but in the live streams I have watched today, I was relieved to see the police curbed their pushing and shoving of women and old men, sending very few crashing to the pavement. I noticed several officers exchanging views with “protestors” in a reasonably civilized manner. This gives me some hope.

The “few hundred” who marched in London yesterday to request Tommy’s release was more like 20,000. Their descriptions of the day will be transmitted to five or ten times that number. However “organized” this march was, the next will be better ordered, perhaps more disciplined, and much more populous. It is a movement now. Wat Tyler’s name has been invoked. The peasants are revolting.

Rather as the deep state/shadow government of the United States created the so-called Islamic State, this Conservative Government has created “Free Tommy Robinson”.  It has, thereby, made a big hole for itself. If it had any sense it would stop digging. Free Tommy now. (You know it makes sense.)

Citizens of the United Kingdom who care about their nation should begin preparations to man (and woman) the barricades. If you don’t support the brave and determined folk who turned out for Tommy yesterday – you may eventually get the ruined state you deserve. It’s a choice. The light of truth and justice or the dark of corruption and lies. The world is watching.

First For News

I have just listened to the six o’clock headlines on Radio Five Live. In London, a chap fell from his horse during the Trooping of the Colour. I hope he’s all right. (Army chap, decent sort, possibly.)

A few hundred unhappy British citizens requesting the release of an activist and reporter, kangaroo courted into an unreasonably long prison sentence can, it seems, be ignored. Move along, nothing to see here.

There are, though, several live streams and reports on YouTube. It all seems to have been rather chaotic but Geert Wilders’ speech was well received and coherently captured by Zuzanna. So, if you have ten minutes to spare…

Beatrice Novelli

6_20170406WheelhouseHouseReflected1_6mThe houses on Cliff Top in Today’s Image, reflected in a Filey Sands tidepool, have been flipped and turned so that they “look right”. The tallest dwelling is the old Coastguard house at the end of Queen Street, named Cliff Point when retired surgeon Claudius Galen Wheelhouse lived there.

I have been researching the SOUTHWELL family for a post next week and found Cliff Point mentioned, so I’m taking the opportunity of the photo “anniversary” to introduce Beatrice.

Her birth was registered twice, in the December Quarter of 1855, and in the March Quarter of the following year. Her given names were Helen Beatrice. She died in 1923 and on her gravestone she is Beatrice Helen. It may have been a bureaucratic slip but perhaps her parents had a change of mind after registration because she is “Beatrice H”, aged 5 at the 1861 census. The family name was transcribed as NOVELLE that year, NOVELLI in 1871 and NOVELLO in 1881. Beatrice married into the SOUTHWELLs in 1888, a family that also fell prey to government clerks. Beatrice Helen and Harry Glanville had nine children and two of their sons were sacrificed in the mud of Flanders. One is not easily traced because the CWGC has him under a different name to the one his family preferred.

Augustin Novelli was born in Manchester and described as a “Counselling Physician” in 1871. He must have had a lucrative practice because his household that year contained eight servants and a governess.

The SOUTHWELL household in 1871 was also well populated with servants. Harry Glanville Senior, ten years younger than Augustin, had seven servants. Obviously, being a “Clergyman without care of souls” paid well. He died unexpectedly between an afternoon of rabbit shooting and an evening game of billiards. The Stamford Mercury reported on 11 July 1890 that he had…

…by his many estimable qualities of mind and heart, won for himself more than common esteem and affection from all classes.

Harry Glanville Junior, aged 19 in 1881, was enumerated in the village of his birth, Limber Magna in Lincolnshire, but was staying with relatives. He gave his occupation as “rabbit fancier”. He must subsequently have decided to get serious about a career. Ten years later he was a law student, married to Beatrice, a father of three, and an employer of seven domestic servants, including two stud horsemen and a groom. A fourth child was born in Caistor in 1892 and the fifth in South Hampstead the following year. The London adventure was short-lived and the last four children entered the world in Filey. In 1901 the family was living on the Crescent but in somewhat diminished circumstances. They only had two servants. Harry was now a solicitor but perhaps not a successful one. It isn’t clear what came first, marriage break-up or Harry’s fall into drug addiction, but in 1908, while living in London, he took an overdose of “veronol” and died. The coroner’s verdict was “suicide whilst temporarily insane”.

In 1911 Beatrice was living in a house named ‘Bohemia’, in Mitford Street, Filey. Her 21-year- old son, Edmund, a law student, was with her. When he left Filey, Beatrice moved into a bungalow at Cliff Point, where she was looked after by a housekeeper, Grace JENKINSON, who clearly became a good friend. In February 1923, Beatrice was staying with Grace, not many doors away at 93 Queen Street. She had her own room and on the evening of the 17th, while getting ready for bed, her nightdress was set alight by the gas fire. Her screams for help were quickly answered, the flames extinguished and Dr. SIMPSON called. Sadly the burns and shock were severe enough to cause her death three days later.

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To our dear mother, BEATRICE HELEN SOUTHWELL, born Oct 5 1855, died Feb 20 1923.

Who is Mr. Reed?

The Crimlisk/Siddle survey of the St Oswald churchyard places a stone remembering Thomas MOSEY and his unfortunate son in Area H. My digitization of the typescript runs as follows:-

H11

To the Memory of THOMAS MOSEY, who died Jan 15th 1826, aged 49 yrs

‘In life much respected and in death much lamented’

JOHN, son of the above, who was drowned in The River Thames, Feb 5th 1819,

aged 17 years, and was interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel                   Road, London.

The East Yorkshire Family History Society version of the Monumental Inscriptions differs slightly and inconsequentially with regard to punctuation – except where Mr. Reed is referenced.

2210

…interred at Mr. Reed’s Chapel Road. London.

Mind the gap! I don’t have the Crimlisk typescript to hand but my guess is that the name of the road – the address of the Chapel – is missing, unreadable. The Mosey stone has since disappeared.

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Some relocated and ‘H’ stones against the north wall, photographed this afternoon

The Reverend Andrew REED founded a school in London in 1813 and its current incarnation in Sandy Lane, Cobham, is an impressive institution. Just the sort of place to which a shipowner might send his child. Alas, Reverend Reed’s founding aim was

…to provide relief to destitute orphans, ‘to rescue them from the walks of vice and profligacy…

His first Orphan Asylum was a house in Shoreditch, so perhaps there isn’t a connection here to young Mosey. Tantalisingly, though, Rev. Reed became minister of New Road Chapel in 1811 following his training. It was later known as the Wycliffe Chapel and he remained in the post there until he was 74 years old (1861).

I couldn’t find a newspaper account of John’s drowning, and he doesn’t have a place yet on FamilySearch Tree. He is the third child of 15 on FG&C. All the children are given a Scarborough birthplace but there is a strong family connection to Filey. Rather touchingly, John was a first cousin once removed to Thomas Henry SUGGIT who died in 1862, aged 14, in a fall from the Carr Naze cliffs. (See LaF Redux post ‘About a Boy’, 6 October.) I hope to connect them on FST before too long.

Freunds Reunited

On this day in 1820 Caroline, daughter of George FREUND and Sarah BROWNE, was baptized in St Mary’s, Whitechapel. Forty eight years later her nephew, George John FREUND married Harriett SUGGIT in Scarborough, thereby connecting her established Metropolitan family with Filey, a small Yorkshire fishing community and “watering place”.

Kath’s Filey Genealogy & Connections has about 17 FREUNDS on it and, partly because of the propensity to call most of the boys George John or John George, her pedigree stumbles once or twice. After spending several hours on the family I have made an executive decision to cast one spouse into outer darkness (Ann KEMP, replacing her with Mary ROHRS) and putting a big question mark against another (Harriet MILNER), though she doesn’t seem totally “wrong”.

FST has the marriage of George John [M94L-DZF] and Mary [M94L-DZ1] but no children. The GRO Index offered me two of Mary’s children, George John born 1839 and Caroline Mary the following year (mother’s maiden name “ROLERS”).

The FamilySearch Tree “system” generates many families in baptism size chunks yielding a bunch of dupe IDs for each parent. So if you have lots of FREUNDS I don’t envy you the merging that must be done to bring the families together.

For a stranger it is an interesting family. In the research I’ve done so far I haven’t found any that were born in Germany. At the 1901 Census the George John who married the Filey girl was described as “Chancellor Imperial German Consulate”. In 1911, aged 72 he was a man of “Private Means”. He died in Lewisham about May 1916 but there is a curious document on Find My Past that records another George John FREUND as a “Prisoner of War (Germany)” two months later. There is a suggestion that he was the Executor of his father’s will. G J Senior had shares in the Great Western Railway and his net worth was assessed at £38,732 in September 1916 (£3,657,627 now, calculated here). George and Harriet’s son was born in 1874 and married Margaret BURR late in life. He is unlikely to have gone to war. A George FREUND, Service number 206290, served in the Northumberland Fusiliers between 1914 and 1920 but his age isn’t given on the Medal Index Cards Transcription on Find My Past.

If anyone reading this does have FREUNDS in the family I’d be happy to share today’s research with you.

Today’s image (previous post) prompted me to take the first bus out to Reighton this morning where I photographed some of the gravestones in the churchyard before walking back to Filey along the beach. I snapped this view of Speeton Cliffs from Sands Road. Mark or Measure?

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