Elizabeth Resurrected

It seems that most of Filey was disconnected from the Internet for several hours yesterday. With a couple of hours of my online “working day” remaining, I thought I would write a brief post on the anniversary of Michael AGAR’s death. (The newspaper publication date erroneously gives the impression that the event took place on Christmas Day.)

William was the oldest of the children but he would follow his father’s calling – and drown before the age of thirty. Elizabeth, his wife, died with him.

In memory of WILLIAM AGAR, Master Mariner aged 28 years, and ELIZABETH his wife aged 27 years, who were lost on their passage from London to Shields during a severe gale on the 7th of January 1839.

I put this photograph on FamilySearch as a memory over three years ago. Elizabeth CHEW had two existing IDs back then and I chose the one generated by a marriage source to represent her on the Shared Tree. The other ID linked to her christening record and parents Robert and Elizabeth nee COOK.

Yesterday, I discovered that both of these IDs had been merged. “My Elizabeth” had been taken from her husband.

It gets worse. The gravestone memory is currently linked to an Elizabeth Chew who rose from a watery grave, married again and had a child. Look here.

And this is the Tree View –

Searching the GRO Births Index for a minute or two reveals Ann Elizabeth’s mother to be Elizabeth GREAVES. Investing a bit more time will gather up Ann Elizabeth’s eight siblings, all registered in Knaresborough. Then check in Free BMD Marriages –

I went a few extra yards to discover this William Agar was a farmer at Hopperton, near Knaresborough. He died aged 48 on 12 September 1855 and a newspaper notice said he was “highly respected”.

William and Elizabeth’s memorial stone stands at the head of an empty grave. Their bodies were not recovered. I haven’t found a definitive account of their ship’s disappearance, or discovered how many other souls were lost from it. Initially, I thought they were passengers but tantalizing circumstantial evidence points to the vessel being owned by William. Perhaps he had taken Elizabeth down to the capital to see the sights. The Shipping and Mercantile Gazette of 19 February 1839 records several casualties of the gale on 7 January, including Fama,under Captain RUSSELL, which went ashore on Spurn Point. Her cargo had to be unloaded and she did not reach Hull until 18 February, “with loss of foremast, bowsprit etc”. And in the Hull Packet of 22 February –

I will try to do right by William and Elizabeth.

Beach 123 · Filey Sands at Arndale

Herring Coble ‘Unity’

The Driffield Times reported on 30 April 1892:-

After having enjoyed spring-like weather for a little while, an unwelcome change took place on Wednesday morning [27th], when it rained and blew incessantly. The weather and wind having changed toward evening, it being fine and pleasant, some of our fishing craft ventured to the fishing ground, and had already got a great many miles from land, when a sudden gale sprung up about four the next morning, a strong north wind blowing accompanied by heavy seas.

The small boats and a couple of larger herring cobles turned for home as soon as the weather “looked treacherous”. Two of the vessels needed the assistance of the lifeboat to get home safely. The skipper of Tally Ho! reported that they had been in the company of a third herring coble and great concern was shown for its crew. The boat was still missing on the morning of Friday (29th).

1892_UnityLost_NEWS

SH87 Unity was  ­40 feet long and weighed 20 tons. Although described above as a Scarborough boat, Captain Syd notes that Thomas COWLING of Filey shared ownership with  John REYNOLDS and Arthur Harrison SELLERS. The database gives the lost-with-all hands-date as 25th April but that may be my digitization error! The official Overseas Deaths and Burials record gives the 28th April and this date appears on the headstone of John and Richard’s parents.

Unity

Also of JOHN AND RICHARD, sons of the above, & EDMUND ROSS JENKINSON, son-in-law, who were lost at sea, April 28th 1892, aged 36, 34 and 30 years.

‘In the midst of life we are in death.’

You can easily navigate to the three men on Filey Genealogy & Connections, from John CAMMISH senior.

Bean, G 1891George BEAN was an incomer to Filey, born in one of the Hecks (Great or Little), near Selby. He is on FG&C but I suspect he has been given the wrong mother there.  You can see, though, that his father in law is ‘Unity Jack’ CRIMLISK, after whom the doomed herring coble was presumably named. The image of him (left) was taken in 1891 in his guise of Treasurer of Filey Red Stars Football Club.

SH140 Tally Ho!, mentioned in the Driffield Times report, was lost in Filey Bay on 8th December 1892.