He, Claudius

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St Oswald’s Church was open for visitors today so I took the opportunity to photograph the bronze plaque that remembers Claudius Galen WHEELHOUSE. I wrote about him on the 9th of this month (A Fine Type of Englishman). I don’t know if this three-dimensional portrait of him is a good likeness but it does him proud.

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In loving memory of

CLAUDIUS GALEN WHEELHOUSE F.R.C.S.

Born 29th Dec 1826, Died 9th April 1909

For twenty years Honorary Surgeon

To the Leeds General Infirmary

President of the British Medical

Association 1889: L.L.D. of McGill

University, Canada 1897: D. Sc. Of

Leeds University 1904: J.P. of

The East Riding of Yorkshire

1889 – 1909: Churchwarden of

this church 1890 – 1909

Some of his friends who loved and honoured him erected

this memorial

NIHIL TETIGIT QUOD NON ORNAVIT

My O level Latin wasn’t up to translating so I resorted to the Internet. Two choices.

He touched nothing which he did not adorn.

He touched nothing without embellishing it.

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The Memorial Plaque is located on the wall to the left of the altar.

A Very Special Lady

There are hundreds of small memorial plaques scattered around Filey. If they were all transcribed and digitized they would make up a database of people, visitors mostly, who loved the town. If their native places were to be found, an interesting distribution map might be drawn, showing Filey’s “hinterland of attraction”.

The first plaque I noticed on my morning walk today gently asked me to remember Margery Joan RABJOHN.

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I was taken initially by her year of birth. She shares 1926 with the scum of the earth I wrote about yesterday so her specialness was a welcome restorative (of faith in human nature). Her family has chosen the Parish Wood as a place of remembrance.

With such an unusual name, I thought it would be easy to find Margery and her forebears.

A quick online search failed to turn up a “meaning” for the name. Ancestry’s 1891 distribution map showed an absence of Rabjohns in Yorkshire but another site remarked that there are still a lot of them living in South Yorkshire.

Margery was born a DEAR, to Thomas and his wife Dorothy M. CARTHEW in Hitchin, Hertfordshire. I struggled to find her DEAR forebears so turned to her husband, Ronald. He was born in Sheffield, South Yorkshire!, in 1924 to Percy and Minnie RABJOHN. Yes, Minnie was born a Rabjohn. I haven’t put my findings in a family tree program but, despite the rarity of the name, I would expect this couple not to be related by blood.

Percy’s parents were William RABJOHN and Eliza Ann EYRE, who married in Sheffield in 1869.

Minnie’s parents were George Charles RABJOHN and Sarah NORTON, who also married in Sheffield but later, in 1882.

At the start of the Second World War Ronald was approaching his fifteenth birthday and working as a Gas Fitter’s apprentice. His father, Percy, had spent some time in the Navy but in 1939 was doing heavy work as a Boiler Fireman. The family was enumerated at 231 Crookesmoore Road, Sheffield.

I found some sources for these Rabjohns on FamilySearch but none had a hoped-for “tree symbol” attached. One should not give up hope in such circumstances. FamilySearch has a quirky way of hiding people. Well, it is more likely that the failing, if it can be called such, is with the searcher’s methodology. When I approached from a different direction I found George Charles straight away on the tree – as Charles George RabJohn.

I spent some time looking in newspaper archives for Margery Joan without success. I’m sure she WAS very special, but perhaps in a low key way, to a select group of friends and family. There is, of course, every chance that she left a considerable mark that my amateurish search failed to uncover. Whatever, I enjoyed my time today with this stranger met by chance in a Filey wood.

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