Applebys

Yesterday was the anniversary of the baptism of William APPLEBY in 1841. There are about a hundred Applebys in Filey Genealogy & Connections and William, son of James and Ann née TAYLOR, is one of six born in Hunmanby. When I began to round up his siblings on the FamilySearch Tree I hoped to connect them to the “Filey Applebys” but found instead that all seem to have steered clear of this place. I was happy to put in the work, though, because the family took me to a place I knew as a child.

William’s father was a corn miller and the birthplaces of his ten children marked his life journey. Second-born Mary Elizabeth in Buckton, the next four in Mappleton, Emma and Eliza in Skirlaugh and the last two in Patrington.

My parents married in the summer of 1940 and when the war was over they lived for a while in a caravan at Woodmansey, near Beverley. Some years after they acquired a proper roof over their heads (and mine) the caravan was transported to Mill Farm, Mappleton. There must have been twenty or more other caravans of unconventional design and construction there, with “regulars” and ephemerals minding their own business or gathering on fine evenings for games of cricket or rounders on the field or down on the beach. I struggle now to remember what happened yesterday but chasing after Applebys brought back so many vivid and happy memories of my summers between the ages of five and twelve.

Mappleton

I remember wandering around All Saints churchyard at dusk and perhaps walked by the grave of Ellen Appleby, who had died 98 years, almost to the day, before I was born.

Ten children equal lots of merging on FST and I didn’t manage to make this Appleby family presentable yesterday. I have not married off any of the children yet, nor “killed off” their parents. There are 22 Filey-born Applebys in FG&C and I expect James the Miller will be related to some of them.

A James Appleby, born in Hunmanby about the same time as “anniversary” William, traded as a Tobacconist in Filey for over twenty years but if the family name is remembered today it will most likely be linked to Appleby’s Farm, where George COLLEY’s horses were stabled. They hauled the cobles down to the waves and back to the landing with their catch. The farm was situated where the Providence Place houses and flats are now.

 

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Photographed this morning.

 

The Bradleys Burn

For most of my life,I have disliked my family name. Now that I know I’m not an ELSOM it doesn’t seem to pain me as much. It is only the name I have an issue with, not my folks to whom it is attached. They’re all good people. I’m OK with being a HESSEY, courtesy of the guy who ravished my 2 times great grandma, but sometimes as I wander among gravestones I see names I would like to try on for size. An old favourite, noticed on one of my first visits to St Oswald’s churchyard, is Bradley BURN. Sounds cool!?

Yesterday’s list of local anniversaries turned up Wilfred BURN, baptized in Bridlington in 1838 so I felt compelled to investigate. He proved to be the third child of a Bradley BURN born in 1806 who married Mary ORMOND in 1831. Wilfred was only three years old when his mother died and thirteen when he became an orphan. He married Eliza NEEDHAM and their four children in Kath’s Filey Genealogy & Connections were all born in Atwick, a place I have never set eyes upon though it is only 20 miles south of here by crow.

Wilfred’s older sister, Rebecca, married the Atwick Miller and had seven children. Her husband Robert BELL approved the name Thomas Bradley for their second child. Rebecca’s other younger brother was a Thomas Bradley too. He married Ann CAPPLEMAN in 1860 and the couple had just one child, a boy, before Thomas died. They named him Bradley and he is the one buried in St Oswald’s churchyard. I went this morning to photograph the headstone that remembers him and his wife Annie née JAMES.

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The stone is in the process of slowly falling over backward and the inscription is somewhat worn. It reads: –

In loving memory of ANNIE, wife of BRADLEY BURN, who died Oct. 8th, 1910 aged 45 years.

‘The memory of the just is blessed

& his servant shall see his face.’

Also, in loving memory of BRADLEY, husband of the above, died June 27th, 1927 aged 64.

‘At rest.’

Sixty-four seems to have been a good age for the Burns and most of the women they married. “Not long-livers”, my mother would have said.

I spent much of yesterday and this morning researching the families and getting totally wrapped up – even though nothing really remarkable seems to have happened to them.

Bradley junior did have the unpleasant experience of being a witness to the death of a workmate and near neighbour in March 1898. He was one of a gang of labourers tasked with taking down a building attached to the Station Hotel on Church Street. A wall collapsed unexpectedly and crushed the life out of George Featherstone  BAXTER,  aged 37. I will write about this unhappy accident when its anniversary comes round but here is an extract from the Bridlington Free Press report.

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Bradley BURN born 1862 FG&C | FST