The Smiths

One William SMITH married Jane NEWTON in Bridlington on 1 June 1765. They had two daughters, Jane born in 1766 in Bridlington and Harriet taking her first breath 22 years later in Scarborough. This is what Filey Genealogy & Connections suggests.

FamilySearch offers a similar story.

It would appear that I made some changes on FST a while ago that agreed on Harriet being their child but I didn’t add baby Jane, even though she “fits” better, born a year after the marriage of her parents.

Harriet’s mother heads one of the households in Roe’s Buildings, Filey, in 1841. Her age, however, is given as “80”, making her four years old in 1765. The first major British census was somewhat cavalier when noting ages but in 1849 a local newspaper had the following death notice:-

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The civil registration agrees that Jane was 91 when she died.

I have looked in vain for another William Smith who married a Jane but, obviously, I must make some changes on FST.

Harriet is with her mother in Roe’s Buildings under her married name, AGAR. Her husband drowned in Plymouth Harbour in 1816. The couple is remembered on their headstone in St Oswald’s churchyard, with Michael’s sister, Zillah.

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“Sleeping” next to Harriet is her sister, Sarah, wife of Jeremiah HUDSON.

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In Memory of SARAH, wife of JEREMIAH HUDSON, Scarborough, Master Mariner, and daughter of WILLIAM and JANE SMITH, who departed this life 11th day of July 1844, aged 52 years.

Sarah is also resident at Roe’s Buildings in 1841, her age given as 45. I thought Sarah must be a widow too but further research found her husband enumerated seven miles away in Scarborough, living alone in Sand Side. He was a sailor and the separation may have been one of convenience. I’m perhaps being charitable because a few months after  Sarah’s death his first child with Jane BROADRICK was born in London. I’ll write more about Jeremiah another time but there is a post on the first Looking at Filey blog, Fisherman Smacked, that might serve to introduce him, though it contains some errors of fact and interpretation. He is on FST with his second wife and their brood but two appearances with Sarah only give the marriage.

The fourth elderly lady at Roe’s buildings was widow Elizabeth BROWN. Three years older than Jane, she may have been her sister. That could be a clue to Jane’s identity – but I haven’t found Elizabeth’s marriage yet. Elizabeth is resting eternally next to Michael Agar and Harriet.

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In memory of ELIZABETH BROWN of Scarborough, widow, who died 17th November 1843, aged 85 years.

Elsewhere…

The “deal” that was so good for the Eurocrats has been dismissed in the UK parliament.  Terrific, but Dr Steve has more confidence than I have that Brexit will happen this year. Styx (‘ware F-bombs) gives some reasons why wanting to remain in the EU makes little sense.

Gone

I was late out for my morning walk. The Bay was empty of ships. Early birds said Alfa Italia was still at anchor first thing so at lunchtime I checked Ship AIS and saw she was then anchored just out of sight around Flamborough Head. Right now, just before 9pm, she is underway at 11.3 knots, heading for Arzew, Algeria. I photographed her yesterday afternoon as it grew dark.

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Thornbury, another of the becalmed tankers mentioned a few days ago, is now on her way north to Sullom Voe.

Yesterday was the anniversary of the deaths of William AGAR and his wife Elizabeth neé CHEW. I looked again for a newspaper account of the loss of the vessel from which they were lost, en route from London to Shields in 1839, and thought for a moment I’d found William. Alas,  it was a late report of a William AGAR of Sunderland who had drowned in late December from a vessel that struck the Seven Stones, a rocky reef between Land’s End and the Isles of Scilly.

I did make a bit of research progress, placing Scarborough William with parents – and becoming more certain than before that his maternal grandmother isn’t the Jane NEWTON on Filey Genealogy & Connections and Family Search Tree. I’ll try to sort out “the old ladies of Roe’s Buildings” and write about them another day. Two of the four have headstones in St Oswald’s churchyard but their husbands are still a mystery.

Sudden Death in a Railway Train

The Scarborough Mercury reported on the 4th December 1885:-

On Monday morning a man named Edward Creaser (76) master tailor, Filey, died in the train while journeying from that place to Scarborough. It appears that the deceased left Filey about 8-30 that morning in the train for Scarborough. On arriving at Cayton the deceased got out with a friend to walk up and down for a while. As he seemed ill the stationmaster was communicated with, and he at once sent the train on to Scarborough, so that the man might have medical assistance. However before the train arrived at Seamer, it was found that the man was dead. It is stated that the deceased has been for some time subject to heart disease. He has been a member and officer of the Primitive Methodist Church at Filey for a long period.

Edward’s age at the various censuses suggests he was born in 1811 or 1812, in Ruston Parva. He found his wife in Filey, marrying Elizabeth NEWTON at St Oswald’s in 1836. Their first 7 children were born in Flamborough, the next in Muston and the last in Filey, in 1855. Edward was still tailoring, and training an apprentice, at the 1881 census, when he gave his age as 69. His son George, then 34, had followed his father into the trade, and daughter Ellen worked as a machinist. Later, in 1902, she is listed in a Directory as a tailor in White’s Yard, off Queen Street.

Four of the Creaser children died in infancy and only two seem to have married, George unhappily to Jane BODDY, Esther more productively with a Norfolk incomer, James HOLMAN, though four of their six children had died before 1911.

In the thirty years or so that Edward resided in Filey, he didn’t rock any boats. The brief account of his death may have been the first time his name appeared in the paper, outside of advertisements for his business.

I have been unable to trace any of his forebears with certainty but, with all those children he had generated a dozen identities, and Elizabeth a like number, on the FamilySearch Tree. Most of this (snowy) morning was spent transforming this… –

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…to this…

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I hope some Creaser descendants will find the pedigree, check my effort and extend it fore and aft.